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*"• CALENDAR 1963 


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sib? Qlnmmxinm^altli nf fKajsaarljua^tta 



A MANUAL 

1^^ FOR THE USE OF THE 

G^ENERAL COURT 

FOR 

1963-1964 



Prepared under Section 11 of Chapter 5 of the General Laws, 
as -most recently amended by Chapter 295 of the Acts of 1947 

BY 

THOMAS A. CHADWICK, Clerk of the Senate 

AND 

WILLIAM C. MAIERS, Clerk of the House 



per /I 



BOSTON 
Wright & Potter Printing Company. Printers 
32 Derne Street 
1963 



^^^ , STATE LIBRARY OF MASSACHUSETTJ 



STATE HOUSE, BOSIQM 



CONTENTS 



Declaration of Independence .... 
Constitution of the United States of America 
Constitution for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
The State House, Seal of the Commonwealth, etc. 
Districts, Congressional, Councillor, Senatorial and Rep 

resentative ...... 

Valuation, Population and Voters 

\^ote for President, Members of Congress and State Of 

ficers ....... 

Statistics, State, Post Office, County and Judiciary- 
State Departments and Institutions . 
Executive Department ..... 

Legislative Department ..... 

Committees ....... 

Rules: 

Of the Senate ...... 

Of the House of Representatives . 
Joint, of the Two Branches 

Notes of Rulings of the Presiding officers: 
On the Constitution 
On the Senate Rules 
On the House Rules 
On the Joint Rules 
Sundry Rulings . 

Index 



PAGE 

1 
9 

37 
145 

161 
207 

231 
303 
391 
449 
458 
505 

539 
571 
611 

645 
663 
691 

745 
757 

771 



DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. 



DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. 



A DECLARATION BY THE REPRESENTATIVES OF 
THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA IN CONGRESS 
ASSEMBLED. 

IJuly 4, 1776.] 

When in the Course of human events, it becomes neces- 
sary for one people to dissolve the political bands which 
have connected them vrith another, and to assume among 
the Powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to 
which the Laws of Nature and of Nature's God entitle them, 
a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that 
they should declare the causes which impel them to the 
separation. 

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are 
created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with 
certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, 
Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness. That to secure these 
rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving 
their just powers from the consent of the governed. That 
whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of 
these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish 
it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation 
on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, 
as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and 
Happiness. Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Govern- 
ments long established should not be changed for light and 
transient causes; and accordingly all experience hath shewn, 
that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are 
sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms 
to which they are accustomed. But when a long train of 
abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same 
Object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute 
Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such 
Government, and to provide new Guards for their future 
security. Such has been the patient sufferance of these 



Declaratio7i of Independence. 



Colonies; and such is now the necessity which constrains 
*thera to alter their former Systems of Government. The 
history of the present King of Great Britain is a history of 
repeated injuries and usurpations, all having in direct object 
the establishment of an absolute Tyranny over these 
States. To prove this, let Facts be submitted to a candid 
world. 

He has refused his Assent to Laws, the most wholesome 
and necessary for the public good. 

He has forbidden his Governors to pass Laws of immediate 
and pressing importance, unless suspended in their operation 
till his Assent should be obtained; and when so suspended, 
he has utterly neglected to attend to them. 

He has refused td' pass other Laws for the accommodation 
of large districts of people, unless those people would relin- 
quish the right of Representation in the Legislature, a right 
inestimable to them and formidable to tyrants only. 

He has called together legislative bodies at places unusual, 
uncomfortable, and distant from the Depository of their 
Public Records, for the sole purpose of fatiguing them into 
compliance with his measures. 

He has dissolved Representative Houses repeatedly, for 
opposing with manly firmness his invasions on the rights of 
the people. 

He has refused for a long time, after such dissolutions, 
to cause others to be elected ; whereby the Legislative Powers, 
incapable of Annihilation, have returned to the People at 
large for their exercise; the State remaining in the meantime 
exposed to all the dangers of invasion from without, and 
convulsions within. 

He has endeavored to prevent the Population of these 
States; for that purpose obstructing the Laws for Natural- 
ization of Foreigners; refusing to pass others to encourage 
their migrations hither, and raising the conditions of new 
Appropriations of Lands. 

He has obstructed the Administration of Justice, by 
refusing his Assent to Laws for establishing Judiciary 
Powers. 

He has made Judges dependent on his Will alone, for the 
tenure of their offices, and the amount and payment of their 
salaries. 

He has erected a multitude of New Offices, and sent hither 



Declaration of Independence. 



swarms of Officers to harrass our People, and eat out their 
substance. 

He has kept among us, in times of peace, Standing Armies 
without the Consent of our legislature. 

He has affected to render the Military independent of and 
superior to the Civil Power. 

He has combined with others to subject us to a jurisdic- 
tion foreign to our constitution, and unacknowledged by our 
laws; giving his Assent to their Acts of pretended Legis- 
lation: 

For quartering large bodies of armed troops among us: 

For protecting them, by a mock trial, from Punishment 
for any Murders which they should commit on the Inhabit- 
ants of these States: 

For cutting off our Trade with all parts of the world: 

For imposing Taxes on us without our Consent: 

For depriving us in many cases, of the benefits of Trial by 
Jury: 

For transporting us beyond Seas to be tried for pretended 
offenses: 

For abolishing the free System of English Laws in a neigh- 
boring Province, establishing therein an Arbitrary govern- 
ment, and enlarging its Boundaries so as to render it at once 
an example and fit instrument for introducing the same ab- 
solute rule into these Colonies: 

For taking away our Charters, abolishing our most valu- 
able Laws, and altering fundamentally the Forms of our 
Governments: 

For suspending our own Legislatures, and declaring them- 
selves invested with Power to legislate for us in all cases 
whatsoever. 

He has abdicated Government here, by declaring us out 
of his Protection and waging War against us. 

He has plundered our seas, ravaged our Coasts, burnt our 
towns, and destroyed the lives of our People. 

He is at this time transporting large Armies of foreign 
Mercenaries to compleat the works of death, desolation and 
tyranny, already begun with circumstances of Cruelty & 
perfidy scarcely paralleled in the most barbarous ages, and 
totally unworthy the Head of a civilized nation. 

He has constrained our fellow-Citizens taken Captive on 
the high Seas to bear Arms against their Country, to become 



Declaration of Independence. 



the executioners of their friends and Brethren, or to fall them- 
selves by their Hands. 

He has excited domestic insurrections amongst us, and 
has endeavored to bring on the inhabitants of our frontiers, 
the merciless Indian Savages, whose known rule of warfare, 
is an undistinguished destruction of all ages, sexes and con- 
ditions. 

In every stage of these Oppressions We have Petitioned 
for Redress in the most humble terms: Our repeated 
Petitions have been answered only by repeated injury. 
A Prince, whose character is thus marked by every act 
which may define a Tyrant, is unfit to be the ruler of a free 
People. 

Nor have We been wanting in attentions to our British 
brethren. We have warned them from time to time of 
attempts by their legislature to extend an unwarrantable 
jurisdiction over us. We have reminded them of the cir- 
cumstances of our emigration and settlement here. We 
have appealed to their native justice and magnanimity, 
and we have conjured them by the ties of our common 
kindred to disavow these usurpations, which, would inevita- 
bly interrupt our connections and correspondence. They 
too have been deaf to the voice of justice and of consan- 
guinity. We must, therefore, acquiesce in the necessity 
which denounces our Separation, and hold them, as we 
hold the rest of mankind. Enemies in War, in Peace 
Friends. 

We, therefore, the Representatives of the United 
States of America, ix general Congress, Assembled, 
appealing to the Supreme Judge of the World for the recti- 
tude of our intentions, do, in the Name, and by Authority 
of the good People of these Colonies, solemnly publish and 
declare, That these United Colonies are, and of Right 
ought to be free and independent States; that they are 
Absolved from all Allegiance to the British Crown, and that 
all political connection between them and the State of 
Great Britain, is and ought to be totally dissolved; and 
that as FREE AND independent States, they have full Power 
to levy War, conclude Peace, contract Alliances, establish 
Commerce, and to do all other Acts and Things which inde- 
pendent States may of right do. And for the support of 
this Declaration, with a firm reliance on the Protection of 



Declaration of Independence, 



Divine Providence. We mutually pledge to each other our 
Lives, our Fortunes and our sacred Honor. 



The foregoing declaration was, by order of Congress, engrossed 
and signed by the following members: 

JOHN HANCOCK, 



JOSIAH BaRTLETT, 

\Vm. Whipple, 



New Hampshire. 

Matthew Thornton, 



Saml. Adams, 
John Adams, 



Step. Hopkins, 

Roger Sherman, 
Sam 'el Huntington, 



Massadhuselts Bay, 

Robt. Treat Paine, 
Elbridge Gerry. 

Rhode Island, etc. 

William Ellery. 

Connecticut. 



Wm. Williams, 
Oliver Wolcott. 



New York. 



Wm. Floyd, 
Phil. Livingston, 



RiCHD. Stockton, 
Jno. Witherspoon, 
Fras. Hopkinson, 



Robt. Morris, 
Benjamin Rush, 
Benja. Franklin, 
John Morton, 
Geo. Clymer, 



Cesar Rodney, 
Geo. Read, 



Samuel Chase, 
Wm. Paca, 



Frans. Lewis, 
Lewis Morris. 



New Jersey. 



John Hart, 
Abra. Clark. 



Pennsylvania. 



Jas. Smith, 
Geo. Taylor, 
James Wilson, 
Geo. Ross. 



Delaware. 



Maryland. 



Tho. M'Kean. 



Thos. Stone, 
Charles Carroll of 
CarroUton. 



8 Declaration of Independence. 

Virginia. 

George Wythe, Thos. Nelson, jr., 

Richard Henry Lee, Francis Lightfoot Lee, 

Th Jefferson, Carter Braxton. 
Benja. Harrison, 

North Carolina. 

Wm. Hooper, John Penn. 

Joseph Hewes, 

South Carolina. 

Edward Rutledge, Thomas Lynch, junr., 

Thos. Heyward, junr., Arthur Middleton. 

Georgia. 

Button Gwinnett, Geo. Walton. 

Lyman Hall, 

Resolved, That copies of the Declaration be sent to the 
several assemblies, conventions, and committees or councils 
of safety, and to the several commanding officers of the 
Continental Troops: That it be proclaimed in each of the 
United States, and at the Head of the Army. — [Jour. 
Cong., vol. I, p. 396.] 



CONSTITUTION 



OF THE 



United States of A 



CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES 
OF AMERICA. 



Preamble. 
Objects of the Constitution. 

Article I. 

Section 1. Legislative powers, in whom vested. Page 13. 

Sect. 2. House of representatives, how and by whom chosen — 
Qualifications of a representative — Representatives and direct taxes, 
how apportioned — Census — Vacancies to be filled — Power of 
choosing otificers, and of impeachment. 14. 

Sect. 3. Senators, how and by whom chosen — How classified 

— Vacancies, how filled — Qualifications of a Senator — President 
of the Senate, his right to vote — President pro tern, and other 
officers of Senate, how chosen — Power to try impeachments — 
When President is tried. Chief Justice to preside — Sentence. 
14, 15. 

Sect. 4. Times, &c., of holding elections, how prescribed — One 
session in each year. 15. 

Sect. 5. Membership — Quorum — Adjournments — Rules 

— Power to punish or expel — Journal — Time of adjournment 
limited, unless, &c. 15, 16. 

Sect. 6. Compensation — Privileges — Disqualification in cer- 
tain cases. 16. 

Sect. 7. House to originate all revenue bills — Veto — Bill 
may be passed by two-thirds of each house, notwithstanding, &c. — 
Bill not returned in ten days — Provision as to all orders, &c. except, 
&c. 16, 17. 

Sect. 8. Powers of Congress. 17,18. 

Sect. 9. Provision as to migration or importation of certain 
persons — Habeas corpus — Bills of attainder, &c. — Taxes, how 
apportioned — No export duty — No commercial preferences — 
No money drawn from treasury, unless, &c. — No titular nobility 

— Officers not to receive presents, unless, &c. 18, 19. 

Sect. 10. States prohibited from the exercise of certain 
powers. 19. 

Article II. 

Section 1. President and Vice-President, their term of office — 
Electors of President and Vice-President, number, and how appointed 

— Electors to vote on same day — Qualifications of President — 

11 



12 Constitution of the United States. 

On whom his duties devolve in case of his removal, death, &c. — 
President's compensation — His oath. 19-21. 

Sect. 2. President to be commander-in-chief — He may require 
opinion of, &c., and may pardon — Treaty-making power — Nomi- 
nation of certain officers — When President may fill vacancies. 
21. 22. 

Sect. 3. President shall communicate to Congress — He may 
convene and adjourn Congress, in case, &c.; shall receive ambassa- 
dors, execute laws, and commission officers. 22, 

Sect. 4. All civil officers forfeited for certain crimes. 22. 

Article III. 

Section 1. Judicial power — Tenure — Compensation. 22. 

Sect. 2. Judicial power, to what cases it extends — Original 
jurisdiction of supreme court — Appellate — Trial by jury, except, 
&c. — Trial, where. 22, 23. 

Sect. 3. Treason defined — Proof of — Punishment of. 23. 

Article IV. 

Section 1. Credit to be given to public acts, &c., of every 
State. 23. 

Sect. 2. Privileges of citizens of each State — Fugitives from 
justice to be delivered up — Persons held to service, having escaped, 
to be delivered up. 23. 

Sect. 3. Admission of new States — Power of Congress over 
territory and other property. 24. 

Sect. 4. Republican form of government guaranteed — Each 
State to be protected. 24. 

Article V. 
Constitution, how amended — Proviso. 24. 

Article VI. 
Certain debts, &c., adopted — Supremacy of Constitution, treaties, 
and laws of the United States — Oath to support Constitution, by 
whom taken — No religious test. 24, 25. 

Article VII. 
Ratification necessary to establish Constitution. 25. 

Amendments. 

I. — Religious estabHshment prohibited — Freedom of speech, 
of the press, and right to petition. 25. 



Constitution of the United States. 13 



II. — Right to keep and bear arms. 25. 

III. — No soldier to be quartered in any house, unless, &c. 25. 

IV. — Right of search and seizure regulated. 25. 

V. — Provisions concerning prosecutions, trials, and punish- 
ments — Private property not to be taken for public 
use, without, &c. 26. 
VI. — Further provisions respecting criminal prosecutions. 26. 
\"II. — Right of trial by jury secured. 26. 
VIII. — Bail, fines, and punishments. 26. 
IX. — Rule of construction. 26. 
X. — Same subject. 26. 
XI. — Same subject. 26. 
XII. — Manner of choosing President and Vice-President. 27. 

XIII. — Slavery abolished. 28. 

XIV. — Citizenship defined — Apportionment of representatives 

— Persons engaged in rebellion excluded from office 

— Debts of United States, and of States contracted 
during the rebellion. 28. 

XV. — Right of citizenship not to be abridged. 29. 
XVI. — Congress may tax incomes without apportionment or 
regard to census. 29. 
XVII. — Senators, number, term, qualification of electors, filling of 

vacancies. 29. 
XVIII. — Manufacture, sale, transportation and exportation of 
intoxicating liquors for beverage purposes prohibited. 
30. 
XIX. — Right to vote not to be denied or abridged on account 

of sex. 30. 
XX. — Terms of President, Vice-President, Senators and Repre- 
sentatives — Time for assembling of Congress — Filling 
of vacancy in case of failure of President-elect to qualify, 
through death or otherwise. 30. 
XXI. — Art. XVIII repealed. Interstate transportation of in- 
toxicating liquors regulated. 31. 
XXII. — President, election limited to two terms. 31. 



We the people of the United States, in order to form a more 
perfect union, establish justice, insure domestic tranquility, 
provide for the common defence, promote the general welfare, 
and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our pos- 
terity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the 
United States of America. 



Article I. 

Section 1. All legislative powers herein granted shall 
be vested in a congress of the United States, which shall con- 
sist of a senate and house of representatives. 



14 Constitution of the United States. 

Sect. 2. The house of representatives shall be composed 
of members chosen every second year by the people of the 
several states, and the electors in each state shall have the 
qualifications requisite for electors of the most numerous 
branch of the state legislature. 

No person shall be a representative who shall not have 
attained to the age of twenty-five years, and been seven years 
a citizen of the United States, and who shall not, when elected, 
be an inhabitant of that state in which he shall be chosen. 

* Representatives and direct taxes shall be apportioned 
among the several states which may be included within this 
Union, according to their respective numbers, which shall 
be determined by adding to the whole number of free persons, 
including those bound to service for a term of years, and 
excluding Indians not taxed, three-fifths of all other persons. 
The actual enumeration shall be made within three years 
after the first meeting of the congress of the United States, 
and within every subsequent term of ten years, in such man- 
ner as they shall by law direct. The number of representa- 
tives shall not exceed one for every thirty thousand, but 
each state shall have at least one representative; and until 
such enumeration shall be made, the state of New Hampshire 
shall be entitled to choose three, Massachusetts eight, Rhode 
Island and Providence Plantations one, Connecticut five. 
New York six, New Jersey four, Pennsylvania eight, Delaware 
one, Maryland six, Virginia ten. North Carolina five, South 
Carolina five, and Georgia three. 

When vacancies happen in the representation from any 
state, the executive authority thereof shall issue wTits of 
election to fill such vacancies. 

The house of representatives shall choose their speaker 
and other officers; and shall have the sole power of impeach- 
ment. 

Sect. 3. f [The senate of the United States shall be com- 
posed of two senators from each state, chosen by the legislature 
thereof, for six years; and each senator shall have one vote.] 

Immediately after they shall be assembled in consequence 
of the first election, they shall be divided as equally as may 
be into three classes. The seats of the senators of the first 
class shall be vacated at the expiration of the second year, 

* See Section 2 of Fourteenth Amendment, 
t See Seventeenth Amendment. 



Constitution of the United States. 15 



of the second class at the expiration of the fourth year, and 
of the third class at the expiration of the sixth year, so that 
one-third may be chosen every second year; * [and if 
vacancies happen by resignation, or otherwise, during 
the recess of the legislature of any stace. the executive 
thereof may make temporary appointments until the 
next meeting of the legislature, which shall then fill such 
vacancies]. 

No person shall be a senator who shall not have attained 
to the age of thirty years, and been nine years a citizen of 
the United States, and who shall not, when elected, be an 
inhabitant of that state for which he shall be chosen. 

The vice-president of the United States shall be president 
of the senate, but shall have no vote, unless they be equally 
divided. 

The senate shall choose their other officers, and also a presi- 
dent pro tempore, in the absence of the vice-president, or when 
he shall exercise the office of president of the United States. 

The senate shall have the sole power to try all impeach- 
ments. When sitting for that purpose, they shall be on oath 
or affirmation. When the president of the United States is 
tried, the chief justice shall preside: and no person shall be 
convicted without the concurrence of two-thirds of the mem- 
bers present. 

Judgment in cases of impeachment shall not extend further 
than to removal from office, and disqualification to hold and 
enjoy any office of honor, trust or profit under the United 
States: but the party convicted shall nevertheless be liable 
and subject to indictment, trial, judgment and punishment, 
according to law. 

Sect. 4. The times, places and manner of holding elec- 
tions for senators and representatives, shall be prescribed 
in each state by the legislature thereof; but the congress may 
at any time by law make or alter such regulations, except as 
to the places of choosing senators. 

t [The congress shall assemble at least once in every year, 
and such meeting shall be on the first Monday in December, 
unless they shall by law appoint a different day.] 

Sect. 5. Each house shall be the judge of the elections, 
returns and qualifications of its own members, and a ma- 



* See Seventeenth Amendment. t See Twentieth Amendment. 



16 Constitution of the United States. 

jority of each shall constitute a quorum to do business; but 
a smaller number may adjourn from day tc day, and may be 
authorized to compel the attendance of absent members, in 
such manner, and under such penalties as each house may 
provide. 

Each house may determine the rules of its proceedings, 
punish its members for disorderly behavior, and, with the 
concurrence of two-thirds, expel a member. 

Each house shall keep a journal of its proceedings, and 
from time to time publish the same, excepting such parts as 
may in their judgment require secrecy; and the yeas and 
na5's of the members of either house on any question shall, 
at the desire of one-fifth of those present, be entered on the 
journal. 

Neither house, during the session of congress, shall, without 
the consent of the other, adjourn for more than three days, 
nor to any other place than that in which the two houses 
shall be sitting. 

Sect. 6. The senators and representatives shall receive 
a compensation for their services, to be ascertained by law, 
and paid out of the treasury of the United States. They 
shall in all cases, except treason, felony and breach of the 
peace, be privileged from arrest during their attendance at 
the session of their respective houses, and in going to and 
returning from the same; and for any speech or debate in 
either house, they shall not be questioned in any other 
place. 

No senator or representative shall, during the time for which 
he was elected, be appointed to any civil offtce under the au- 
thority of the United States, which shall have been created, 
or the emoluments whereof shall have been increased during 
such time; and no person holding any office under the United 
States, shall be a member of either house during his contin- 
uance in office. 

Sect. 7. All bills for raising revenue shall originate in the 
house of representatives; but the senate may propose or 
concur with amendments as on other bills. 

Every bill which shall have passed the house of representa- 
tives and the senate, shall, before it become a law, be pre- 
sented to the president of the United States; if he approve 
he shall sign it, but if not he shall return it, with his objec- 



Constitution of the United States. 17 

tions, to that house in which it shall have originated, who 
shall enter the objections at large on their journal, and pro- 
ceed to reconsider it. If after such reconsideration two-thirds 
of that house shall agree to pass the bill, it shall be sent, 
together with the objections, to the other house, by which 
it shall likewise be reconsidered, and if approved by two- 
thirds of that house, it shall become a law. But in all such 
cases the votes of both houses shall be determined by yeas 
and nays, and the names of the persons voting for and 
against the bill shall be entered on the journal of each house 
respectively. If any bill shall not be returned by the presi- 
dent within ten days (Sundays excepted) after it shall have 
been presented to him, the same shall be a law, in like man- 
ner as if he had signed it, unless the congress by their ad- 
journment prevent its return, in which case it shall not be 
a law. 

Every order, resolution, or vote to which the concurrence 
of the senate and house of representatives may be necessary 
(except on a question of adjournment) shall be presented to 
the president of the United States; and before the same shall 
take effect, shall be approved by him, or being disapproved 
by him, shall be repassed by two-thirds of the senate and 
house of representatives, according to the rules and limita- 
tions prescribed in the case of a bill. 

Sect. 8. The congress shall have power — to lay and 
collect taxes, duties, imposts and excises, to pay the debts 
and provide for the common defence and general welfare 
of the United States; but all duties, imposts and excises 
shall be uniform throughout the United States; — to bor- 
row money on the credit of the United States; — to regulate 
commerce with foreign nations, and among the several states, 
and with the Indian tribes; — to establish an uniform rule 
of naturalization, and uniform laws on the subject of bank- 
ruptcies throughout the United States; — to coin money, 
regulate the value thereof, and of foreign coin, and fix the 
standard of weights and measures; — to provide for the 
punishment of counterfeiting the securities and current coin 
of the United States; — to establish post offices and post 
roads; — to promote the progress of science and useful arts, 
by securing for limited times to authors and inventors the 
exclusive right to their respective writings and discoveries; 
— to constitute tribunals inferior to the supreme court; — to 



18 Constitution of the United States. 



define and punish piracies and felonies committed on the 
high seas, and offences against the law of nations; — to de- 
clare war, grant letters of marque and reprisal, and make 
rules concerning captures on land and water; — to raise 
and support armies, but no appropriation of money to that 
use shall be for a longer term than two years; — to provide 
and maintain a navy; — to make rules for the government 
and regulation of the land and naval forces; — to provide 
for calling forth the militia to execute the laws of the Union, 
suppress insurrections, and repel invasions; — to provide 
for organizing, arming, and disciplining the militia, and 
for governing such part of them as may be employed in 
the service of the United States, reserving to the states re- 
spectively, the appointment of the officers, and the author- 
ity of training the militia according to the discipline pre- 
scribed by congress; — to exercise exclusive legislation in 
all cases whatsoever, over such district (not exceeding ten 
miles square) as may, by cession of particular states, and 
the acceptance of congress, become the seat of the govern- 
ment of the United States, and to exercise like authority 
over all places purchased by the consent of the legislature 
of the state in which the same shall be, for the erection of 
forts, magazines, arsenals, dock yards, and other needful 
buildings; — and to make all laws which shall be necessary 
and proper for carrying into execution the foregoing powers, 
and all other powers vested by this constitution in the gov- 
ernment of the United States, or in any department or officer 
thereof. 

Sect. 9. The migration or importation of such persons, 
as any of the states now existing shall think proper to ad- 
mit, shall not be prohibited by the congress prior to the 
year one thousand eight hundred and eight, but a tax or 
duty may be imposed on such importation, not exceeding 
ten dollars for each person. 

The privilege of the writ of habeas corpus shall not be 
suspended, unless when in cases of rebellion or invasion 
the public safety may require it. 

No bill of attainder or ex post facto law shall be passed. 

No capitation, or other direct tax, shall be laid, unless in 
proportion to the census or enumeration hereinbefore directed 
to be taken. 



Constitution of the United States. 19 



No tax or duty shall be laid on articles exported from any 
state. 

No preference shall be given by any regulation of commerce 
or revenue to the ports of one state over those of another; nor 
shall vessels bound to. or from, one state, be obliged to enter, 
clear or pay duties in another. 

No money shall be drawn from the treasury, but in conse- 
quence of appropriations made by law; and a regular state- 
ment and account of the receipts and expenditures of all 
public money shall be published from time to time. 

No title of nobility shall be granted by the United States; 
and no person holding any office of profit or trust under them 
shall, without the consent of the congress, accept of any pres- 
ent, emolument, office or title, of any kind whatever, from any 
king, prince, or foreign state. 

Sect. 10. No state shall enter into any treaty, alliance, or 
confederation; grant letters of marque and reprisal; coin 
money; emit bills of credit; make any thing but gold and 
silver coin a tender in payment of debts; pass any bill of at- 
tainder, ex post facto law, or law impairing the obligation of 
contracts, or grant any title of nobility. No state shall, 
without the consent of the congress, lay any imposts or duties 
on imports or exports, except what may be absolutely neces- 
sary for executing its inspection laws: and the net produce of 
ail duties and imposts, laid by any state on imports or exports, 
shall be for the use of the treasury of the United States; and 
all such laws shall be subject to the revision and control of 
the congress. No state shall, without the consent of congress, 
lay any duty of tonnage, keep troops, or ships of war in time 
of peace, enter into any agreement or compact with another 
state, or with a foreign power, or engage in war, unless actually 
invaded, or in such imminent danger as will not admit of 
delay. 

Article II. 

Section 1. The executive power shall be vested in a 
President of the United States of America. He shall hold 
his office during the term of four years, and, together with 
the vice-president, chosen for the same term, be elected, as 
follows : — 

Each state shall appoint, in such manner as the legislature 
thereof may direct, a number of electors, equal to the whole 



20 Constitution of the United States. 



number of senators and representatives to which the state 
may be entitled in the congress; but no senator or representa- 
tive, or person holding an office of trust or profit under the 
United States, shall be appointed an elector. 

*[The electors shall meet in their respective states, and 
vote by ballot for two persons, of whom one at least shall 
not be an inhabitant of the same state with themselves. 
And they shall make a list of all the persons voted for, 
and of the number of votes for each; which list they shall 
sign and certify, and transmit sealed to the seat of the 
government of the United States, directed to the president 
of the senate. The president of the senate shall, in the 
presence of the senate and house of representatives, open 
all the certificates, and the votes shall then be counted. 
The person having the greatest number of votes shall be 
the president, if such number be a majority of the whole 
number of electors appointed; and if there be more than 
one who have such majority, and have an equal number of 
votes, then the house of representatives shall immediately 
choose by ballot one of them for president; and if no per- 
son have a majority, then from the five highest on the list 
the said house shall in like manner choose the president. 
But in choosing the president, the votes shall be taken by 
states, the representation from each state having one vote; 
a quorum for this purpose shall consist of a member or 
members from two-thirds of the states, and a majority of 
all the states shall be necessary to a choice. In every case, 
after the choice of the president, the person having the 
greatest number of votes of the electors shall be the vice- 
president. But if there should remain two or more who 
have equal votes, the senate shall choose from them by 
ballot the vice-president.] 

The congress may determine the time of choosing the elec- 
tors, and the day on which they shall give their votes; which 
day shall be the same throughout the United States. 

No person except a natural born citizen, or a citizen of the 
United States, at the time of the adoption of this constitution, 
shall be eligible to the office of president; neither shall any 
person be eligible to that office who shall not have attained to 
the age of thirty-five years, and been fourteen years a resident 
within the United States. 

In case of the removal of the president from office, or of 

* See Twelfth Amendment. 



Constitution of the United States. 2 1 

his death, resignation, or inability to discharge the powers 
and duties of the said office, the same shall devolve on the 
vice-president, and the congress may by law provide for 
the case of removal, death, resignation, or inability, both 
of the president and vice-president, declaring what officer 
shall then act as president, and such officer shall act accord- 
ingly, until the disability be removed, or a president shall be 
elected. 

The president shall, at stated times, receive for his services, 
a compensation, which shall neither be increased nor dimin- 
ished during the period for which he shall have been elected, 
and he shall not receive within that period any other emolu- 
ment from the United States, or any of them. 

Before he enter on the execution of his office, he shall take 
the following oath or affirmation : — 

"I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will faithfully 
execute the office of president of the United States, and will 
to the best of my ability, preserve, protect and defend the 
constitution of the United States." 



Sect, 2. The president shall be commander-in-chief ot 
the army and navy of the United States, and of the militia 
of the several states, when called into the actual service of 
the United States; he maj^ require the opinion, in writing, 
of the principal officer in each of the executive departments, 
upon any subject relating to the duties of their respective 
offices, and he shall have power to grant reprieves and par- 
dons for offences against the United States, except in cases 
of impeachment. 

He shall have power, by and with the advice and consent 
of the senate, to make treaties, provided two-thirds of the 
senators present concur; and he shall nominate, and by 
and with the advice and consent of the senate, shall appoint 
ambassadors, other public ministers and consuls, judges 
of the supreme court, and all other officers of the United 
States, whose appointments are not herein otherwise pro- 
vided for, and which shall be established by law: but the 
congress may by law vest the appointment of such in- 
ferior officers, as they think proper, in the president 
alone, in the courts of law, or in the heads of depart- 
ments. 

The president shall have power to fill up all vacancies 
that may happen during the recess of the senate, by grant- 



22 Constitution oj the United States. 



ing commissions which shall expire at the end of their next 
session. 

Sect. 3. He shall from time to time give to the congress 
information of the state of the Union, and recommend to 
their consideration such measures as he shall judge neces- 
sarj'- and expedient; he may, on extraordinary occasions, 
convene both houses, or either of them, and in case of dis- 
agreement between them, with respect to the time of ad- 
journment, he maj^ adjourn them to such time as he shall 
think proper; he shall receive ambassadors and other public 
ministers; he shall take care that the laws be faithfully exe- 
cuted, and shall commission all the officers of the United 
States. 

Sect. 4. The president, vice-president, and all civil 
officers of the United States, shall be removed from office 
on impeachment for, and conviction of, treason, bribery, or 
other high crimes and misdemeanors. 

Article III. 
Section 1. The judicial power of the United States shall 
be vested in one supreme court, and in such inferior 
courts as the congress may from time to time ordain and 
establish. The judges, both of the supreme and inferior 
courts, shall hold their offices during good behavior, and 
shall, at stated times, receive for their services, a compen- 
sation, which shall not be diminished during their continu- 
ance in office. 

Sect. 2. The judicial power shall extend to all cases, 
in law and equity, arising under this constitution, the laws 
of the United States, and treaties made, or which shall be 
made, under their authority; — to all cases affecting am- 
bassadors, other public ministers, and consuls; — to all 
cases of admiralty and maritime jurisdiction; — to con- 
troversies to which the United States shall be a party; — - 
to controversies between two or more states; — between a 
state and citizens of another state; — between citizens of 
different states; — between citizens of the same state claim- 
ing lands under grants of different states, and between a 
state, or the citizens thereof, and foreign states, citizens or 
subjects. 

In all cases affecting ambassadors, other public ministers 
and consuls, and those in which a state shall be a party, the 



Constitution of the United States. 23 



supreme court shall have original jurisdiction. In all the 
other cases before mentioned, the supreme court shall have 
appellate jurisdiction, both as to law and fact, with such 
exceptions, and under such regulations as the congress shall 
make. 

The trial of all crimes, except in cases of impeachment, 
shall be by jury; and such trial shall be held in the state 
where the said crimes shall have been committed; but 
when not committed within any state, the trial shall be at 
such place or places as the congress may by law have 
directed. 

Sect. 3. Treason against the United States, shall con- 
sist only in levying war against them, or in adhering to 
their enemies, giving them aid and comfort. No persons 
shall be convicted of treason' unless on the testimony of 
two witnesses to the same overt act, or on confession in 
open court. . 

The congress shall have power to declare the punish- 
ment of treason, but no attainder of treason shall work 
corruption of blood, or forfeiture except during the life of 
the person attainted. 

Article IV. 

Section 1. Full faith and credit shall be given in each 
state to the public acts, records, and judicial proceedings of 
every other state. And the congress may by general laws 
prescribe the manner in which such acts, records and proceed- 
ings shall be proved, and the effect thereof. 

Sect. 2. The citizens of each state shall be entitled 
to all privileges and immunities of citizens in the several 
states. 

A person charged in any state with treason, felony, or other 
crime, who shall flee from justice, and be found in another 
state, shall, on demand of the executive authority of the state 
from which he fled, be delivered up to be removed to the state 
having jurisdiction of the crime. 

No person held to service or labor in one state, under 
the laws thereof, escaping into another, shall, in conse- 
quence of any law or regulation therein, be discharged 
from such service or labor, but shall be delivered up on 
claim of the party to whom such service or labor may be 
due. 



24 Constitution of the United States. 

Sect. 3. New states may be admitted by the congress 
into this Union; but no new state shall be formed or erected 
within the jurisdiction of any other state; nor any state be 
formed by the junction of two or more states, or parts of 
states, without the consent of the legislatures of the states 
concerned as well as of the congress. 

The congress shall have power to dispose of and make all 
needful rules and regulations respecting the territory or other 
property belonging to the United States; and nothing in this 
constitution shall be so construed as to prejudice any claims 
of the United States or of any particular state. 

Sect. 4, The United States shall guarantee to every state 
in this Union a republican form of government, and shall pro- 
tect each of them against invasion, and on application of the 
legislature, or of the executive (when the legislature cannot 
be convened) against domestic violence. 

Article V. 

The congress, whenever two-thirds of both houses shall 
deem it necessary, shall propose amendments to this consti- 
tution, or, on the application of the legislatures of two- 
thirds of the several states, shall call a convention for pro- 
posing amendments, which, in either case, shall be valid to 
all intents and purposes, as part of this constitution, when 
ratified by the legislatures of three-fourths of the several 
states, or by conventions in three-fourths thereof, as the 
one or the other mode of ratification may be proposed by 
congress; provided that no amendment which may be made 
prior to the year one thousand eight hundred and eight 
shall in any manner affect the first and fourth clauses in 
the ninth section of the first article; and that no state, with- 
out its consent, shall be deprived of its equal suffrage in the 
senate. 

Article VL 

All debts contracted and engagements entered into be- 
fore the adoption of this constitution, shall be as valid 
against the United States under this constitution, as under 
the confederation. 

This constitution, and the laws of the United States 
which shall be made in pursuance thereof; and all treaties 
made, or which shall be made, under the authority of the 



Constitution of the United States. 25 



United States, shall be the supreme law of the land; and the 
judges in every state shall be bound thereby, any thing in 
the constitution or laws of any state to the contrary not- 
withstanding. 

The senators and representatives before mentioned, and the 
members of the several state legislatures, and all executive 
and judicial officers, both of the United States and of the 
several states, shall be bound by oath or affirmation, to sup- 
port this constitution; but no religious test shall ever be re- 
quired as a qualification to any office or public trust under 
the United States. 

Article VII. 

The ratification of the conventions of nine states, shall be 
sufficient for the establishment of this constitution between 
the states so ratifying the same. 



ARTICLES 

IN ADDITION TO, AND AMENDMENT OF, 

The Constitution of the United States of America, proposed 
by congress, and ratified by the legislatures of the several 
states, pursuant to the fifth article of the original 
constitution. 

Article I. Congress shall make no law respecting an es- 
tablishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; 
or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the 
right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the 
government for a redress of grievances. 

Art. II. A well regulated militia, being necessary to the 
security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and 
bear arms shall not be infringed. 

Art. III. No soldier shall, in time of peace, be quartered 
in any house, without the consent of the owner, nor in time 
of war, but in a manner to be prescribed by law. 

Art. IV. The right of the people to be secure in their 
persons, houses, papers and effects, against unreasonable 
searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no warrants 



26 Constitiitio7i of the United States. 



shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or 
affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be 
searched, and the persons or things to be seized. 

Art. V. No person shall be held to answer for a capital, 
or other\vise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or 
indictment of a grand jury, except in cases arising in the 
land or naval forces, or in the militia, when in actual service 
in time of war or public danger; nor shall any person 
be subject for the same offence to be twice put in jeopardy 
of life or limb; nor shall be compelled in any criminal 
case to be a witness against himself, nor be deprived of life, 
liberty or property, without due process of law; nor shall 
private property be taken for public use, without just 
compensation. 

Art. VI. In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall 
enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial 
jury of the state and district wherein the crime shall have 
been committed, which district shall have been previously 
ascertained by law, and to be informed of the nature and 
cause of the accusation; to be confronted with the witnesses 
against him; to have compulsory process for obtaining wit- 
nesses in his favor, and to have the assistance of counsel for 
his defence. 

Art. VII. In suits at common law, where the value in 
controversy shall exceed twenty dollars, the right of trial 
by jurj' shall be preserved, and no fact tried by a jury shall 
be otherwise re-examined in any court of the United States, 
than according to the rules of the common law. 

Art. VIII. Excessive bail shall not be required, nor exces- 
sive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments in- 
flicted. 

Art. IX. The enumeration in the constitution, of certain 
rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others 
retained by the people. 

Art. X, The powers not delegated to the United States 
by the constitution, nor prohibited by it to the states, are 
reserved to the states respectively, or to the people. 

Art. XI. The judicial power of the United States shall 
not be construed to extend to any suit in law or equity, com- 



Constittition of the United States. 27 



menced or prosecuted against one of the United States by 
citizens of another state, or by citizens or subjects of any 
foreign state. 

Art. XII, The electors shall meet in their respective 
states, and vote by ballot for president and vice-president, 
one of whom, at least, shall not be an inhabitant of the same 
state with themselves; they shall name in their ballots 
the person voted for as president, and in distinct ballots 
the person voted for as vice-president, and they shall make 
distinct lists of all persons voted for as president, and 
of all persons voted for as vice-president, and of the number 
of votes for each, which lists they shall sign and certify, 
and transmit sealed to the seat of the government of the 
United States, directed to the president of the senate; — 
the president of the senate shall, in presence of the senate 
and house of representatives, open all the certificates and 
the votes shall then be counted; — the person having the 
greatest number of votes for president, shall be the president, 
if such number be a majority of the whole number of electors 
appointed; and if no person have such majority, then 
from the persons having the highest numbers not exceeding 
three on the list of those voted for as president, the 
house of representatives shall choose immediately, by ballot, 
the president. But in choosing the president, the votes 
shall be taken by states, the representation from each state 
having one vote; a quorum for this purpose shall consist 
of a member or members from two-thirds of the states, 
and a majority of all the states shall be necessar}- to a choice. 
And if the house of representatives shall not choose a 
president whenever the right of choice shall devolve upon 
them, before the fourth day of March next following, 
then the vice-president shall act as president, as in the 
case of the death or other constitutional disability of the 
president. 

The person having the greatest number of votes as vice- 
president, shall be the vice-president, if such number be a 
majority of the whole number of electors, appointed, and if 
no person have a majority, then from the two highest numbers 
on the list, the senate shall choose the vice-president; a 
quorum for the purpose shall consist of two-thirds of the 
whole number of senators, and a majority of the whole number 
shall be necessary to a choice. 



28 Constitution of the United States. 

But no person constitutionally ineligible to the office of 
president shall be eligible to that of vice-president of the 
United States. 

Art. XIII. Sect. 1. Neither slavery nor involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the 
party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the 
United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction. 

Sect. 2. Congress shall have power to enforce this article 
by appropriate legislation. 

Art. XIV. Sect. 1. All persons born or naturalized in 
the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, 
are citizens of the United States and of the state wherein 
they reside. No state shall make or enforce any law which 
shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the 
United States; nor shall any state deprive any person of life, 
liberty or property, without due process of law, nor deny to 
any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the 
laws. , 

Sect. 2. Representatives shall be apportioned among 
the several states according to their respective numbers, 
counting the whole number of persons in each state, ex- 
cluding Indians not taxed. But when the right to vote at 
any election for the choice of electors for president and 
vice-president of the United States, representatives in con- 
gress, the executive and judicial officers of a state, or the 
members of the legislature thereof, is denied to any of the 
male inhabitants of such state, being twenty-one years of 
age, and citizens of the United States, or in any way 
abridged, except for participation in rebellion or other 
crime, the basis of representation therein shall be reduced 
in the proportion which the number of such male citizens 
shall bear to the whole number of male citizens twenty- 
one years of age in such state. 

Sect. 3. No person shall be a senator, or representative 
in congress, or elector of president and vice-president, or 
hold any office, civil or military, under the United States, 
or under any state, who, having previously taken an oath, 
as a member of congress, or as an officer of the United 
States, or as a member of any state legislature, or as an 
executive or judicial officer of any state, to support the 
constitution of the United States, shall have engaged in 
insurrection or rebellion against the same, or given aid or 



Constitution of the United States. 29 

comfort to the enemies thereof. But congress may, by a 
vote of two-thirds of each house, remove such disability. 

Sect. 4. The vaHdity of the public debt of the United 
States, authorized by law, including debts incurred for pay- 
ment of pensions and bounties for services in suppressing in- 
surrection or rebellion, shall not be questioned. 

But neither the United States, nor any state, shall as- 
sume or pay any debt or obligation incurred in aid of in- 
surrection or rebellion against the United States, or any 
claim for the loss or emancipation of any slave; but all 
such debts, obligations and claims shall be held illegal and 
void. 

Sect. 5. The congress shall have power to enforce, by 
appropriate legislation, the provisions of this article. 

Art. XV. Sect. 1. The right of citizens of the United 
States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United 
States, or by any state, on account of race, color, or previous 
condition of servitude. 

Sect. 2. The congress shall have power to enforce this 
article by appropriate legislation. 

Art. XVI. The congress shall have power to lay and 
collect taxes on incomes, from whatever source derived, 
without apportionment among the several states, and with- 
out regard to any census or enumeration. 

Art. XVII * The senate of the United States shall be 
composed of two senators from each state, elected by the 
people thereof, for six years; and each senator shall have 
one vote. The electors in each state shall have the qualifi- 
cations requisite for electors of the most numerous branch 
of the state legislatures. 

When vacancies happen in the representation of any state 
in the senate, the executive authority of such state shall issue 
writs of election to fill such vacancies: provided, that the 
legislature of any state may empower the executive thereof 
to make temporary appointment until the people fill the 
vacancies by election as the legislature may direct. 

This amendment shall not be so construed as to affect 

* " In lieu of the first paragraph of section three of article I of the 
constitution of the United States, and in lieu of so much of paragraph 
two of the same section as relates to the fiUing of vacancies." 



30 Constitution of the United States. 



the election or terra of any senator chosen before it becomes 
valid as part of the constitution. 

*[Art. XVIII. Sect. 1. After one year from the ratifica- 
tion of this article the manufacture, sale, or transportation of 
intoxicating liquors within, the importation thereof into, or 
the exportation thereof from the United States and all terri- 
tory subject to the jurisdiction thereof for beverage purposes 
is hereby prohibited. 

Sect. 2. The Congress and the several States shall have 
concurrent power to enforce this article by appropriate 
legislation. 

Sect. 3. This article shall be inoperative unless it shall 
have been ratified as an amendment to the Constitution by 
the legislatures of the several States, as provided in the Con- 
stitution, within seven years from the date of the submission 
hereof to the States by the Congress.] 

Art. XIX. The right of citizens of the United States to 
vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or 
by any State on account of sex. 

Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appro- 
priate legislation. 

Art. XX. vSect. 1. The terms of the President and Vice 
President shall end at noon on the 20th day of January, and 
the terms of Senators and Representatives at noon on the 
3d day of January, of the years in which such terms would 
have ended if this article had not been ratified ; and the terms 
of their successors shall then begin. 

Sect. 2. f The Congress shall assemble at least once in 
every year, and such meeting shall begin at noon on the 
3d day of January, unless they shall by law appoint a different 
day. 

Sect. 3. If, at the time fixed for the beginning of the term 
of the President, the President elect shall have died, the 
Vice President elect shall become President. If a President 
shall not have been chosen before the time fixed for the be- 
ginning of his term, or if the President elect shall have failed 
to qualify, then the Vice Piesident elect shall act as 
President until a President shall have qualified; and the 

* Repealed. See Twenty-first Amendment. 

t"In lieu of the second paragraph of section 4 of article I of the 
constitution of the United States." 



Constitution of the United States. 31 

Congress may by law provide for the case wherein neither 
a President elect nor a Vice President elect shall have quali- 
fied, declaring who shall then act as President, or the manner 
in which one who is to act shall be selected, and such persons 
shall act accordingly until a President or Vice President shall 
have qualified. 

Sect, 4. The Congress may by law provide for the case 
of the death of any of the persons from whom the House 
of Representatives may choose a President whenever the 
right of choice shall have devolved upon them, and for the 
case of the death of any of the persons from whom the Senate 
may choose a Vice President whenever the right of choice 
shall have devolved upon them. 

Sect. 5. Sections 1 and 2 shall take effect on the 15th 
day of October following the ratification of this article. 

Sect. 6. This article shall be inoperative unless it shall 
have been ratified as an amendment to the Constitution by 
the legislatures of three-fourths of the several States within 
seven years from the date of its submission. 

Art. XXI. Sect. 1. The eighteenth article of amend- 
ment to the Constitution of the United States is hereby re- 
pealed. 

Sect. 2. The transportation or importation into any 
State, Territor}', or possession of the United States for de- 
livery or use therein of intoxicating liquors, in violation of 
the laws thereof, is hereby prohibited. 

Sect. 3. This article shall be inoperative unless it shall 
have been ratified as an amendment to the Constitution by 
conventions in the several States, as provided in the Consti- 
tution, within seven years from the date of the submission 
hereof to the States by the Congress. 

Art. XXII. Sect. 1. No person shall be elected to the 
office of the President more than twice, and no person who 
has held the office of President, or acted as President, for 
more than two years of a term to which some other person 
was elected President shall be elected to the office of the 
President more than once. But this Article shall not apply 
to any person holding the office of President when this Article 
was proposed by the Congress, and shall not prevent any 
pervson who may be holding the office of President, or acting 
as President, during the term within which this Article be- 



32 Constitution of the United States. 

comes operative from holding the office of President or acting 
as President during the remainder of such term. 

Sect. 2. This article shall be inoperative unless it shall 
have been ratified as an amendment to the Constitution by 
the legislatures of three-fourths of the several vStates within 
seven years from the date of its submission to the States by 
the Congress. 

[Note. The constitution was adopted September 17, 1787, by the 
unanimous consent of the states present in the convention appointed 
in pursuance of the resolution of the congress of the confederation of 
February 21, 1787, and was ratified by the conventions of the several 
states, as follows, viz.: By convention of Delaware, December 7, 1787; 
Pennsylvania, December 12, 1787; New Jersey, December 18, 1787; 
Georgia, January 2, 1788; Connecticut, January 9, 1788; Massachu- 
setts, February 6, 1788; Maryland, April 28, 1788; South Carolina, 
May 23, 1788; New Hampshire, June 21, 1788; Virginia, June 26, 
1788; New York, July 26. 1788; North Carolina, November 21, 1789; 
Rhode Island, May 29, 1790. 

The first ten amendments were proposed to the legislatures of the 
several states at the first session of the first congress of the United 
States, September 25, 1789, and were finally ratified by the constitu- 
tional number of states on December 15, 1791. Subsequently they 
were ratified by Massachusetts on March 2, 1939. 

The eleventh amendment was proposed to the legislatures of the 
several states at the first session of the third congress, March 5, 1794, 
and was declared in a message from the President of the United States 
to both houses of congress, dated January 8, 1798, to have been adopted 
by the legislatures of three-fourths of the states. 

The twelfth amendment was proposed to the legislatures of the sev- 
eral states at the first session of the eighth congress, December 12, 1803, 
and was ratified by the legislatures of three-fourths of the states in 
1804. according to a public notice thereof by the secretary of state, 
dated September 25 of the same year. 

The thirteenth amendment was proposed to the legislatures of the 
several states by the thirty-eighth congress on February 1, 1865, and 
was declared, in a proclamation of the secretary of state, dated De- 
cember 18, 1865, to have been ratified by the legislatures of three- 
fourths of the states. 

The fourteenth amendment was proposed to the legislatures of the 
several states by the thirty-ninth congress, on June 16, 1866. 

On July 20, 1868, the secretary of state of the United States issued 
his certificate, setting out that it appeared by official documents on 
file in the department of state that said amendment had been ratified 



Constitution of the United States, 33 



by the legislatures of the states of Connecticut, New Hampshire, Ten' 
nessee, New Jersey, Oregon, Vermont, New York, Ohio, Illinois, West 
Virginia. Kansas, Maine, Nevada, Missouri, Indiana, Minnesota, 
Rhode Island, Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, Michigan, Massachusetts, 
Nebraska and Iowa, and by newly established bodies avowing them- 
selves to be and acting as the legislatures of the states of Arkansas, 
Florida, North Carolina, Louisiana, South Carolina and Alabama; 
that the legislatures of Ohio and New Jersey had since passed resolu- 
tions withdrawing the consent of those states to said amendment; 
that the whole number of states in the United States was thirty-seven, 
that the twenty-three states first above named and the six states next 
above named together, constituted three-fourths of the whole number 
of states, and certifying that if the resolutions of Ohio and New Jersey, 
ratifying said amendment were still in force, notwithstanding their sub- 
sequent resolutions, then said amendment had been ratified and so 
become valid as part of the constitution. 

On July 21, 1868, congress passed a resolution reciting that the 
amendment had been ratified by Connecticut, Tennessee, New Jersey, 
Oregon, Vermont, West Virginia, Kansas, Missouri, Indiana, Ohio, 
Illinois, Minnesota, New York, Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, 
Michigan, Nevada, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Nebraska, Maine, 
Iowa, Arkansas, Florida, North Carolina, Alabama, South Carolina and 
Louisiana, being three-fourths of the several states of the Union, and 
declaring said fourteenth article to be a part of the constitution of the 
United States, and making it the duty of the secretary of state to duly 
promulgate it as such. 

On July 28, 1868, the secretary of state issued his certificate, reciting 
the above resolution, and stating that official notice had been received 
at the department of state that action had been taken by the legisla- 
tures of the states in relation to said amendment, as follows: "It was 
ratified in A.D. 1866, by Connecticut, June 30; New Hampshire, July 7; 
Tennessee, July 19; Oregon, September 19; Verynont, November 9. In 
A.D. 1867, by New York, January 10; Illinois, January 15; West 
Virginia, January 16; Kansas, January 18; Maine, January 19; 
Nevada, January 22; Missouri, January 26; Indiana, January 29; 
Minnesota, February 1; Rhode Island, February 7; Wisconsin, Febru- 
ary 13; Pennsylvania, February 13; Michigan, February 15; Massa- 
chusetts, March 20; Nebraska, June 15. In A.D. 1868 by Iowa, April 3; 
Arkansas, April 6; Florida, June 9; Louisiana, July 9; and Alabama, 
July 13. 

"It was first ratified and the ratification subsequently withdrawn 
by New Jersey, ratified September 11, 1866, withdrawn April, 1868; 
Ohio, ratified January 11, 1867, and withdrawn January. 1868. 

It was first rejected and then ratified by Georgia, rejected Novem- 
ber 13, 1866, ratified July 21, 1868; North Carolina, rejected Decem- 
ber 4, 1866, ratified July 4, 1868; South Carolina, rejected December 
20, 1866, ratified July 9. 1868. 

"It was rejected by Texas, November 1, 1866; Virginia, January 9, 
1867; Kentucky. January 10, 1867; Delaware, February 7, 1867; and 
Maryland. March 23, 1867." 



34 Constitution of the United States. 



And on said July 28, 1868, and in execution of the act proposing the 
amendment and of the concurrent resolution of congress above men- 
tioned and in pursuance thereof, the secretary of state directed that 
said amendment to the constitution be published in the newspapers 
authorized to promulgate the laws of the United States, and certified 
that it had been adopted in the manner above specified by the states 
named in said resolution, and that it "has become valid to all intents 
and purposes as a part of the constitution of the United States." 

Subsequently, it was ratified by Virginia, October 8, 1869, by Georgia, 
again, February 2, 1870, and by Texas, February 18, 1870. 

The fifteenth amendment was proposed to the legislatures of the 
several states by the fortieth congress on February 27, 1869, and was 
declared, in a proclamation of the secretary of state, dated March 30, 
1870, to have been ratified by the legislatures of the constitutional 
number of states and to have "become valid to all intents and purposes 
as part of the constitution of the United States." 

The sixteenth amendment was proposed to the legislatures of the 
several states by the sixty-first congress, at its first session, in 1909. 
On February 25, 1913, the secretary of state made proclamation 
to the effect that, from official documents on file in the department, 
it appeared that the am.endment had been ratified by the legislatures 
of the states of Alabama, Kentucky, South Carolina, Illinois, Mississippi, 
Oklahoma, Maryland, Georgia, Texas, Ohio, Idaho, Oregon, Washing- 
ton, California, Montana, Indiana, Nevada, North Carolina, Nebraska, 
Kansas, Colorado, North Dakota, Michigan, Iowa, Missouri, Maine, 
Tennessee, Arkansas, Wisconsin, New York, South Dakota, Arizona, 
Minnesota, Louisiana, Delaware and Wyoming, in all thirty-six; and, 
further, that the states whose legislatures had so ratified the said pro- 
posed amendment constituted three-fourths of the whole number of 
States in the United States; and, further, that it ap:;eared from official 
documents on file in the department that the legislatures of New 
Jersey and New Mexico had passed resolutions ratifying the said pro- 
posed amendment. He further certified that the amendment had 
"become valid to all intents and purposes as a part of the constitu- 
tion of the United States." 

The seventeenth amendment was proposed to the legislatures of the 
several states by the sixty-second congress, at its second session, in 
1912. On May 31, 1913, the secretary of state made proclamation 
to the effect that, from official documents on file in the department, it 
appeared that the amendment had been ratified by the legislatures of 
the states of Massachusetts, Arizona, Minnesota, New York, Kansas, 
Oregon, North Carolina, California, Michigan, Idaho, West Mrginia, 
NebrasRa, Iowa, Montana, Texas, Washington, Wyoming, Colorado, 
Illinois, North Dakota, Nevada, Vermont, Maine, New Hampshire, 
Oklahoma, Ohio, South Dakota, Indiana, Missouri, New Mexico, New 
Jersey, Tennessee, Arkansas, Connecticut, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin; 
and, further, that the states whose legislatures had so ratified the said 



Constitution of the United States. 35 

proposed amendment constituted three-fourths of the whole number of 
states in the United States. He further certified that the amendment 
had "become vahd to all intents and purposes as a part of the con- 
stitution of the United States." 

The eighteenth amendment was proposed to the legislatures of the 
several states by the sixty-fifth congress, at its second session, in 1917. 
On January 29. 1919, the acting secretary of state made proclamation 
to the effect that, from official documents on file in the department, it 
appeared that the amendment had been ratified by the legislatures of 
the states of Alabama, Arizona, California, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, 
Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine* 
Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Montana, 
Nebraska, New Hampshire, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Okla^ 
homa, Oregon, South Dakota, South Carolina, Texas, Utah, Virginia, 
Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin and Wyoming; and, further,. 
that the states whose legislatures had so ratified the said proposed 
amendment constituted three-fourths of the whole number of states 
in the United States. He further certified that the amendment had 
"become valid to all intents and purposes as a part of the constitution 
of the United States." 

The nineteenth amendment was proposed to the legislatures of the 
several states by the sixty-sixth congress, at its first session, in 1919. 
On August 26, 1920, the secretary of state made proclamation that, 
from official documents on file in the department, it appeared that the 
amendment had been ratified by the legislatures of the states oi Arizona, 
Arkansas, California, Colorado, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, 
Kentucky, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, 
Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, 
North Dakota, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode 
Island, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Washington, West Vir- 
ginia, Wisconsin and Wyoming; and, further, that the states whose 
legislatures had so ratified the said proposed amendment constituted 
three-fourths of the whole number of states in the United States. He 
further certified that the amendment had "become valid to all intents 
and purposes as a part of the constitution of the United States." 

The twentieth amendment was proposed to the legislatures of the 
several states by the seventy-second congress, at its first session, in 
1931. On February 6, 1933, the secretary of state made proclamation 
that, from official documents on file in the department, it appeared 
that the amendment had been ratified by the legislatures of the states of 
Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Dela- 
ware, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, 
Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, 
Montana, Nebraska, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, North 
Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, 
South Dakota, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wis- 
consin and Wyoming; and, further, that the states whose legislatures 



36 Constitution of the United States. 

had so ratified the said proposed amendment constituted more than 
the requisite three-fourths of the whole number of states in the United 
States. He further certified that the amendment had "become valid 
to all intents and purposes as a part of the constitution of the United 
States." 

The twenty-first amendment was proposed to conventions of the 
several states by the seventy-second congress, at its second session, in 
1933, On December 5, 1933, the acting secretary of state made 
proclamation that, from official notices received at the department, it 
appeared that the amendment had been ratified by conventions in the 
states of Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, 
Delaware, Florida, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Maryland, 
Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nevada, New Hampshire, 
New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode 
Island, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West 
Virginia, Wisconsin and Wyoming; and, further, that the states wherein 
conventions had so ratified the said proposed amendment constituted 
the requisite three-fourths of the whole number of states in the United 
States. He further certified that the amendment had "become valid 
to all intents and purposes as a part of the constitution of the United 
States." 

The twenty-second amendment was proposed to the legislatures of 
the several states by the eightieth congress, at its first session, in 1947. 
On March 1, 1951, the administrator of general services certified that 
from official documents on file in the general services administration 
it appeared that the amendment had been ratified by the legislatures 
of the states of Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, 
Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Maine, 
Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New 
Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, 
North Dakota, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Tennessee, 
Texas' Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Wisconsin and Wyoming; and, further 
that the states whose legislatures had so ratified the said proposed 
amendment constituted the requisite three-fourths of the whole number 
of states in the United States. He further certified that the amendment 
had "become valid to all intents and purposes as a part of the con- 
stitution of the United States."] 



CONSTITUTION 



FORM OF GOVERNMENT 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts 



CONSTITUTION OR FORM OF GOVERNMENT 

FOR THE 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Preamble. 

Objects of government — Body politic, how formed — Its nature. 
Page 48. 

PART THE FIRST. 

Declaration of Rights. 

Article 1. Equality and natural rights of all men. 49. 

Art. 2. Right and duty of public religious worship. 49. 

ART. 3. Legislature empowered to compel provision for public 
worship — Legislature to enjoin attendance — Exclusive right of elect- 
ing religious teachers secured — Option as to whom parochial taxes 
may be paid, unless, etc. — • All denominations equally protected — 
Subordination of one sect to another prohibited. 49. 

Art. 4. Right of self-government secured. 50. 

Art. 5. Accountability of all officers, etc. 50. 

Art. 6. Services rendered to the pubHc being the only title to 
pecuhar privileges, hereditary offices are absurd and unnatural. 51. 

Art. 7. Objects of government; right of people to institute and 
change it. 51. 

Art. 8. Right of people to secure rotation in office. 51. 

Art. 9. All. having the qualifications prescribed, equally eligible 
to office. 51. 

Art. 10. Right of protection and duty of contribution correlative 
— Taxation founded on consent — Private property not to be taken 
for public uses without, etc. 51. 

Art. 11. Remedies, by recourse to the law, to be free, complete 
and prompt. 52. 

Art. 12. Prosecutions regulated — Right to trial by jury in crimi- 
nal cases, except, etc. 52. 

Art. 13. Crimes to be proved in the vicinity. 52. 

Art. 14. Right of search and seizure regulated. 53. 

Art. 15. Right to trial by jury sacred, except, etc. 53. 

Art. 16. Liberty of the press. 53. [Annulled. See Amendmente. 
Art. 77.] 

Art. 17. Right to keep and bear arms — Standing armies danger- 
ous — Military power subordinate to civil. 53. 

39 



40 Constitution of Massachusetts. 

Art. 18. Moral qualifications for office — Moral obligations of law- 
givers and magistrates. 53. 

Art. 19. Right of people to assemble peaceably, to instruct rep- 
resentatives and to petition legislature. 54. 

Art. 20. Power to suspend the laws or their execution. 54. 

Art. 21. Freedom of debate, etc., and reason thereof. 54. 

Art. 22. Frequent sessions, and objects thereof. 54. 

Art. 23. No tax without consent. 54. 

Art. 24. Ex /'05i/(ictL) laws prohibited. 54. 

Art. 25. Legislature not to convict of treason, etc. 55. 

Art. 26. Excessive bail or fines, and cruel punishments, prohib- 
ited. 55. 

Art. 27. No soldier to be quartered in any house, unless, etc. 55. 

Art. 28. Citizen? exempt from law-martial, unless, etc. 55. 

Art. 29. Judges of supreme judicial court — Tenure of their office 
— Salaries. 55. 

Art. 30. Separation of legislative, executive and judicial depart- 
ments. 55. 

PART THE SECOND. 
The Frame of Government. 

Title of body politic. 56. 

Chapter I. 

the legislative power. 

Section I. 

The General Court. 

Article 1. Legislative department. 56. 

Art. 2. Governor's veto — Bill or resolve may be passed by two- 
thirds of each house, notwithstanding — Bill or resolve not returned 
within five days to be law. 56. 

Art. 3. General court may constitute judicatories, courts of record, 
etc. — Courts, etc., may administer oaths. 57. 

ART. 4. General court may enact laws etc., not repugnant to the 
constitution; may provide for the election or appointment of officers; 
prescribe their duties; impose taxes, duties and excises, to be disposed 
of for defence, protection, etc. — Valuation of estates once in ten years, 
at least, while, etc. 57. 

Section IL 
Senate. 
Article 1. Senate, number and by whom elected — Counties to 
be districts, until, etc. 60. 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 41 

Art. 2. Manner and time ot choosing senators and councillors — 
Word "inhabitant" defined — Selectmen to preside at town meetings 
— Return of votes — Inhabitants of unincorporated plantations, who 
pay state taxes may vote — Plantation meetings — Assessors to notify, 
etc. 60. 

ART. 3. Governor and council to examine and count votes, and 
issue summonses. 62. 

Art. 4. Senate to be final judge of elections, etc., of its own mem- 
bers — Vacancies, how filled. 62. 

Art. 5. Qualifications of a senator. 63. 

Art. 6. Not to adjourn more than two days. 63. 

Shall choose its officers and establish its rules. 63. 

Shall try all impeachments — Oath — Limitation of sen- 



Art. 


7. 


Art, 


8. 


tence. 


63. 


Art. 


9. 



Quorum. 64. 

Section III. 
House of Representatives. 
Article 1. Representation of the people 64. 
Art. 2. Representatives, by whom chosen — Proviso as to towns 
having less than 150 ratable polls — Towns liable to fine in case, etc. 

— Expenses of travelling to and from the general court, how paid. 
64. 

Art. 3. Qualifications of a representative. 65. 
Art. 4. Qualifications of a voter. 65. 
Art. 5. Representatives, when chosen. 65. 
Art. 6. House alone can impeach 65. 
ART. 7. House to originate all money bills. 65. 
Art. 8. Not to adjourn more than two days. 66. 
Art. 9. Quorum. 66. 

Art. 10. To judge of returns, etc., of its own members; to choose 
its officers and establish its rules, etc. — May punish for certain offences 

— Privileges of members. 66. 

Art. 11. Senate and Governor and council may punish — General 
limitation — Trial may be by committee, or otherwise. 66. 

Chapter 11. 
executive power. 
Section I. 
Governor. 
Article 1. Governor — His title. 67. 
Art. 2. To be chosen annually — Qualifications. 67. 
Art. 3. To be chosen by the people, by a majority of votes — How 
chosen, when no person has a majority. 67. 



42 Constitution of Massachusetts. 



Art. 4. Power of governor to assemble council and power of gov- 
ernor and council. 68. 

Art. 5. Power of governor and council to adjourn or prorogue 
general court and convene the same. 68. 

Art. 6. Governor and council may adjourn general court in cases, 
etc., but not exceeding ninety days. 69. 

Art. 7. Governor to be commander-in-chief — Limitation. 69. 
[Annulled. See Amendments, Art. 54.] 

Art. 8. Pardoning power. 70. [Annulled. See Amendments, 
Art. 73.] 

Art. 9. Judicial officers, etc., how nominated and appointed. 
70. 

Art. 10. Militia officers, how elected — How commissioned — 
Election of ofificers — Major-generals, how appointed and commissioned 
— Vacancies, how filled, in case, etc. — Officers duly commissioned, 
how removed — Adjutants, etc., how appointed — Organization of 
militia. 70. [Annulled. See Amendments, Art. 53.] 

Art. 11. Money, how drawn from the treasury, except, etc. 71. 

Art, 12. All public boards, etc., to make quarterly returns. 72. 

Art. 13. Salary of governor — Salaries of justices of supreme judi- 
cial court — Salaries to be enlarged, if insufficient. 72. 

Section II. 
Lieutenant-Governor. 
Article 1. Lieutenant-governor, his title and qualifications — 
How chosen. 73, 

Art. 2. Governor to be president of council — Lieutenant-gover- 
nor a member of, except, etc. 73. 

Art. 3. Lieutenant-governor to be acting governor, in case, etc. 73. 

Section III. 
Council, and the Manner of settling Elections by the Legislature. 

Article 1. Council. 74. 

Art. 2. Number; from whom, and how chosen — If senators be- 
come councillors, their seats to be vacated. 74. 

Art. 3. Rank of councillors. 74. 

Art. 4. No district to have more than two. 74. 

Art. 5. Register of council. 74. 

Art. 6. Council to exercise power of governor in case, etc. 75. 
[Annulled. See Amendments, Art. 55.] 

Art. 7. Elections may be adjourned until, etc. — Order thereof, 
75. 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 43 

Section IV. 
Secretary, Treasurer, Commissary, etc. 
Article 1. Secretary, etc., by whom and how chosen — Treasurer 
ineligible for more than five successive years. 75. 

Art. 2. Secretary to keep records, to attend the governor and 
council, etc. 76. 

Chapter III. 

JUDICIARY POWER. 

Article 1. Tenure of all commissioned officers to be expressed — 
Judicial officers to hold office during good behavior, except, etc. — 
But may be removed on address. 76. 

Art. 2. Justices of supreme judicial court to give opinions when 
required. 76. 

Art. 3. Justices of the peace; tenure of office. 76. 

Art. 4. Provisions for holding probate courts. 77. 

Art. 5. Provisions for determining causes of marriage, divorce, 
etc. 77. 

Chapter IV. 

DELEGATES TO CONGRESS. 

Election, etc. 77. [Annulled.] 

Chapter V. 

the university at cambridge, and encouragement of literature, 

etc. 

Section I. 

The University. 

Article 1. Harvard College — Powers, privileges, etc., of the 

president and fellows confirmed. 78. 

Art. 2. All gifts, grants, etc., confirmed. 78. 

Art. 3. Who shall be overseers — Power of alteration reserved to 
the legislature. 79. 

Section II. 
The Encouragement of Literature, etc. 
Duty of legislatures and magistrates in all future periods. 79. 
Chapter VI. 

OATHS AND INCOMPATIBILITY OF OFFICE; ENACTING STYLE; REVISAL 
OF CONSTITUTION, ETC. 

Article 1. Oaths of allegiance and office, etc. 80. 

Art. 2. Plurality of officers prohibited to governor, etc., except, 
etc. — Incompatible offices — Bribery, etc., disqualify. 82. 

Art. 3. Value of money ascertained — Property qualifications may 
be increased. 83. 



44 Constitution of Massachusetts. 



Art. 


5. 


Art. 


6. 


Art. 


7. 


Art. 


8. 


Art. 


9. 


Art. 


10. 


Art. 


11, 


85. 





Provisions respecting commission. 83. 

Provisions respecting writs. 83. 

Continuation of former laws, except, etc. 83. 

Benefit of habeas corpus secured, except, etc. 84. 

The enacting style. 84. 

Officers of former government continued until, etc. 84. 

Provision for revising constitution. 84. 

Provision for preserving and publishing this constitution. 



Amendments. 

Article 1. Bill, etc., not approved within five days, not to become 
a law, if legislature adjourn in the meantime. 86. 

Art. 2. General court empowered to charter cities and to es- 
tablish limited town meeting form of government — Proviso. 86. 

Art. 3. Qualifications of voters for governor, lieutenant-governor, 
senators and representatives. 86. 

Art. 4. Notaries public, how appointed and removed — Vacancies 
in the offices of secretary and treasurer, how filled, in case, etc. — 
Commissary-general may be appointed, in case, etc. — Militia officers, 
how removed. 87. 

Art. 5. Who may vote for captains and subalterns. 87. [An- 
nulled. See Art. 53.] 

Art. 6. Oath to be taken by all officers; or affirmation in case, etc. 
88. 

Art. 7. Tests abolished. 88. 

Art. 8. Incompatibility of offices. 88. 

Art. 9. Amendments to constitution, how made. 89. [.Annulled. 
See Art. 48.] 

Art. 10. Commencement of political year; and termination — 
Governor, etc., term of office — Meetings for choice of governor, lieu- 
tenant-governor, etc., when to be held; may be adjourned. 89. 

Art. 11. Religious freedom established. 91. 

Art. 12. Census of ratable polls — Representatives, how appor- 
tioned. 91. 

Art. 13. Census — Senatorial districts — Apportionment of repre- 
sentatives and councillors — Freehold as a qualification for a seat in 
general court or council not required. 93. 

ART. 14. Election by people to be by plurality. 95. 

Art. 15. Time of annual election of governor, lieutenant-governor 
and legislature. 95. 

Art. 16. Eight councillors, how chosen — State to be districted — 
Eligibility defined — Day and manner of election — Vacancies, how 
filled — Organization of government. 9.S. 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 45 

Art. 17. Election of secretary, treasurer, auditor and attorney- 
general — Vacancies, how filled — To qualify within ten days — 
Qualifications. 96. 

Art. 18. School money not to be applied for sectarian schools. 97. 
Art. 19. Legislature to prescribe for election of sheriffs, registers 
of probate, etc. 97. 

Art. 20. Reading constitution in English and writing, necessary 
qualifications of voters — Proviso. 97. 

Art. 21. Census of voters and inhabitants — House of representa- 
tives to consist of 240 members — Legislature to apportion, etc. — 
Qualifications of representatives — Quorum. 98. [Annulled. See 
Art. 71.] 

Art. 22. Census of voters and inhabitants — Senate to consist of 
40 members — Senatorial districts — Proviso — Qualifications of sen- 
ators — Quorum. 99. [Annulled. See Art. 71.] 

Art. 23. Residence of two years required of naturalized citizens 
to entitle to suffrage, or make eligible to office. 100. [Annulled. See 
Art. 26.] 

Art. 24. Vacancies in Senate. 100. 

Art. 25. Vacancies in council. 101. 

Art. 26. Twenty-third article annulled. 101. 

Art. 27. Officers of Harvard College may be elected members of 
the general court. 101. 

Art. 28. Persons having served in the U. S. army or navy, etc., not 
to be disqualified from voting, etc. 101. 

Art. 29. General court empowered to provide more than one place 
of meeting in towns for the election of officers, and to prescribe manner 
of calling, etc., such meetings. 101. 

Art. 30. Voters not disqualified by reason of change of residence 
until six months from time of removal. 102. 

Art. 31. Article twenty-eight amended. 102. 

Art. 32. So much of article three annulled as makes the payment 
of a poll tax a prerequisite for voting. 102. 

Art. 33. A majority of each branch of the general court to con- 
stitute a quorum, etc. 102. 

Art. 34. Property quaUfication of governor annulled. 103. 

Art. 35. Clause in relation to payment of travelling expenses of 
members of the house annulled. 103. 

Art. 36. So much of article nineteen as is contained in the words 
"Commissioners of Insolvency" annulled. 103. 

Art. 37. Governor, with the consent of the council, may remove 
justices of the peace and notaries public. 103. 

Art. 38. Voting machines may be used at elections, under regu- 
lations. 103. 



46 Constitution of Alassachusetts. 



Art. 39. Powers of legislature relative to excess takings of land, 
etc., for laying out, widening or relocating highways, etc. — Proviso. 
103. 

Art. 40. Article three of amendments amended so as to exclude 
from voting persons disqualified by law because of corrupt practices in 
elections. 104. 

Art. 41. Taxation of wild or forest lands. 104. 

Art. 42. Authority given to general court to refer acts and resolves 
to the people for rejection or approval. 104. [Annulled. See Art. 48.] 

Art. 43. Authority given to general court to authorize the com- 
monwealth to take land, etc., to relieve congestion of population and 
provide homes for citizens. 104. 

Art. 44. Authority given to general court to tax income. 105. 

Art. 45. Authority given to general court to provide for absent 
voting. 105. [Annulled. See Art. 76.] 

Art. 46. Religious freedom — Public money not to be appropri- 
ated for founding, maintaining or aiding educational, charitable or 
religious institutions not publicly owned, except, etc. — Care or support 
of public charges in private hospitals — Religious services for inmates 
of certain institutions. 105. 

Art. 47. General court may provide for maintenance and distri- 
bution of food, etc., in time of war, public exigency, emergency or 
distress, by the commonwealth, cities and towns. 107. 

Art. 48. The Initiative and Referendum. 107. 

Art. 49. Conservation, etc., of natural resources of common- 
wealth. 117. 

Art. 50. Regulation of advertising in public places. 118. 

Art. 51. Preservation and maintenance of property of historical 
and antiquarian interest. 118. 

Art. 52. General court may take a recess. 118. 

i^jiT. 53. Selection of officers of the militia. 118. 

Art. 54. Powers of the governor as commander-in-chief. 118. 

Art. 55. Succession in cases of vacancies in the offices of governor 
and lieutenant-governor. 119. 

Art. 56. Return of bills and resolves by the governor with recom- 
mendation for amendment. 119. 

Art. 57. Women to be eUgible to appointment as notaries public, 
119. 

Art. 58. Retirement of judicial officers. 120. 

Art. 59. Revocation of grants, franchises, privileges or immunities. 
120. 

Art. 60. Power of general court to establish building zones or 
districts. 120. 

Art. 61. Compulsory voting at elections. 120. 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 47 



Art. 62. Lending the credit of the commonwealth — Common- 
wealth may borrow — Vote required — Expenditure limited. 120. 

Art. 63. A State budget and veto of items by the governor. 120. 

Art. 64. Biennial elections — Treasurer inehgible for more than 
three successive terms — General court to assemble annually — First 
election under this article. 122. 

Art. 65. Appointment of legislators to office and service upon 
recess committees. 122. 

Art. 66. Organization of not more than twenty departments to 
perform the executive and administrative work of the commonwealth. 
123. 

Art. 67. Roll-call on "Emergency Measures" not required unless 
requested by two senators or five representatives. 123. 

Art. 68. Word "male" stricken out from qualifications for voting. 
123. 

Art. 69. Removal of ineligibility of women to hold office — Re- 
registration of women as notaries pubhc, upon change of name. 123. 

Art. 70. General court authorized to provide limited forms of town 
meetings in towns containing more than six thousand but less than 
twelve thousand inhabitants. 124. 

Art. 71. Twenty-first and twenty-second articles annulled and 
superseded — Census of inhabitants and special enumeration of voters 

— House of Representatives, number. Legislature to apportion, etc. 

— Senate, number — Senatorial and councillor districts — Qualifica- 
tions of representatives and senators. 124. 

Art. 72. Biennial sessions of the general court — Biennial budget — 
Provisions requiring general court to meet annually annulled. 126. 
[Annulled. See Art. 75.] 

Art. 73. General court may regulate pardons for a felony. 127. 

Art. 74. Article 48, Initiative and Referendum, amended. 127. 

Art. 75. Annual sessions of the general court and annual budget 
restored. 130. 

Art 76. Authority given to general court to provide for voting by 
physically disabled persons. 130. 

Art. 77. Liberty of the press — Free speech. 130. 

Art. 78. Revenue from use of vehicles to be used for highway 
purposes only. 130. 

Art. 79. Vacancies on account of failure to elect secretary, treas- 
urer, auditor or attorney general, or in case of death before qualifica- 
tion, how filled. 131. 

Art. 80. Terms of elected state officers — Succession in cases of 
death of governor and lieutenant-governor before qualification. 131. 

.\rt. 81. .Article 48, Initiative and Referendum, amended. 132. 



48 Constitution of Massachusetts. 



PREAMBLE. 

The end of the institution, maintenance and administration 
of government, is to secure the existence of the body politic, to 
protect it, and to furnish the individuals who compose it, with 
the power of enjoying in safety and tranquility their natural 
rights, and the blessings of life: and whenever these great 
objects are not obtained, the people have a right to alter the 
government, and to take measures necessary for their safety, 
prosperity, and happiness. 

The body politic is formed by a voluntary association of indi- 
viduals: it is a social compact, by which the whole people 
covenants with each citizen, and each citizen with the whole 
people, that all shall be governed by certain laws for the com- 
mon good. It is the duty of the people, therefore, in framing a 
constitution of government, to provide for an equitable mode 
of making laws, as well as for an impartial interpretation, and 
a faithful execution of them; that every man may, at all times, 
find his security in them. 

We, therefore, the people of Massachusetts, acknowledging, 
with grateful hearts, the goodness of the great Legislator of the 
universe, in affording us, in the course of His providence, an 
opportunity, deliberately and peaceably, without fraud, vio- 
lence or surprise, of entering into an original, explicit, and 
solemn compact with each other; and of forming a new con- 
stitution of civil government, for ourselves and posterity; and 
devoutly imploring His direction in so interesting a design, do 
agree upon, ordain and establish, the following Declaration of 
Rights, and Frame of Government, as the Constitution of 
THE Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 49 



PART THE FIRST. 

A Declaration of the Rights of the Inhabitants of the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts. 

Article I. All men are born free and equal, and have cer- 
tain natural, essential, and unalienable rights; among which 
may be reckoned the right of enjoying and defending their 
lives and liberties; that of acquiring, possessing, and protect- 
ing property; in fine, that of seeking and obtaining their 
safety and happiness. 

Art. II. It is the right as well as the duty of all men in 
society, publicly, and at stated seasons to worship the Su- 
preme Being, the great Creator and Preserver of the universe. 
And no subject shall be hurt, molested, or restrained, in his 
person, liberty, or estate, for worshipping God in the manner 
and season most agreeable to the dictates of his own conscience, 
or for his religious profession or sentiments; provided he 
doth not disturb the public peace, or obstruct others in their 
religious worship. [See Amendments, Arts. XLVI and 
XLVIIL] 

Art. III. [As the happiness of a people, and the good order 
and preservation of civil government, essentially depend upon 
piety, religion, and morality; and as these cannot be generally 
diffused through a community, but by the institution of the 
public worship of God, and of public instructions in piety, 
religion and morality; Therefore, to promote their happiness 
and to secure the good order and preservation of their govern- 
ment, the people of this Commonwealth have a right to invest 
their legislature with power to authorize and require, and the 
legislature shall, from time to time, authorize and require, the 
several towns, parishes, precincts, and other bodies politic, or 
religious societies, to make suitable provision, at their own 
expense, for the institution of the public worship of God, and 
for the support and maintenance of public Protestant teachers 



50 Constitution of Massachusetts. 

of piety, religion and morality, in all cases where such pro- 
vision shall not be made voluntarily. 

And the people of this Commonwealth have also a right to, 
and do, invest their legislature with authority to enjoin upon 
all the subjects an attendance upon the instructions of the 
public teachers aforesaid, at stated times and seasons, if there 
be any on whose instructions they can conscientiously and con- 
veniently attend. 

Provided notwithstanding, that the several towns, parishes, 
precincts, and other bodies politic, or religious societies, shall, 
at all times, have the exclusive right of electing their public 
teachers, and of contracting with them for their support and 
maintenance. 

And all moneys, paid by the subject to the support of public 
worship, and of the public teachers aforesaid, shall, if he 
require it, be uniformly applied to the support of the public 
teacher or teachers of his own religious sect or denomination, 
provided there be any on whose instructions he attends; 
otherwise it may be paid towards the support of the teacher 
or teachers of the parish or precinct in which the said moneys 
are raised. 

And every denomination of Christians, demeaning them- 
selves peaceably, and as good subjects of the Commonwealth, 
shall be equally under the protection of the law: and no sub- 
ordination of any one sect or denomination to another shall 
ever be established by law.] [Art. XI of Amendments sub- 
stituted for this.] 

Art. IV. The people of this commonwealth have the sole 
and exclusive right of governing themselves, as a free, sov- 
ereign, and independent state; and do, and forever hereafter 
shall, exercise and enjoy every power, jurisdiction, and right, 
which is not, or may not hereafter, be by them expressly dele- 
gated to the United States of America in Congress assembled. 

Art. V. All power residing originally in the people, and 
being derived from them, the several magistrates and officers 
of government, vested with authority, whether legislative, 
executive, or judicial, are their substitutes and agents, and 
are at all times accountable to them. 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 51 

Art. VI. No man, nor corporation, or association of men, 
have any other title to obtain advantages, or particular and 
exclusive privileges, distinct from those of the community, than 
what arises from the consideration of services rendered to the 
public; and this title being in nature neither hereditary, nor 
transmissible to children, or descendants, or relations by blood, 
the idea of a man born a magistrate, lawgiver, or judge, is 
absurd and unnatural. 

Art. VII. Government is instituted for the common good; 
for the protection: safety, prosperity, and happiness of the 
people; and not for the profit, honor, or private interest of any 
one man, family, or class of men: Therefore the people alone 
have an incontestable, unalienable, and indefeasible right to 
institute government; and to reform, alter, or totally change 
the same, when their protection, safety, prosperity and happi- 
ness require it. 

Art. VIII. In order to prevent those, who are vested with 
authority, from becoming oppressors, the people have a right, 
at such periods and in such manner as they shall establish by 
their frame of government, to cause their public officers to 
return to private life; and to fill up vacant places by certain 
and regular elections and appointments. 

Art. IX. All elections ought to be free; and all the in- 
habitants of this Commonwealth, having such qualifications as 
they shall establish by their frame of government, have an 
equal right to elect officers, and to be elected, for public 
employments. [See Amendments, Arts. XLV and XLVIII, 
The Initiative, II, sect. 2.] [For compulsory voting, see 
Amendments, Art. LXL] [For use of voting machines at 
elections, see Amendments, Art. XXXVIII.] [For absent 
voting, see Amendments, Art. LXXVI.] 

Art. X. Each individual of the society has a right to be 
protected by it in the enjoyment of his life, liberty and prop- 
erty, according to standing laws. He is obliged, consequently, 
to contribute his share to the expense of this protection; to 
give his personal service, or an equivalent, when necessary: 
but no part of the property of any individual, can, with justice. 



52 Constitutio7i of Massachusetts. 

be taken from him, or applied to public uses, without his own 
consent, or that of the representative body of the people. In 
fine, the people of this Commonwealth are not controllable by 
any other laws than those to which their constitutional rep- 
resentative body have given their consent. And whenever 
the public exigencies require, that the property of any indi- 
vidual should be appropriated to public uses, he shall receive 
a reasonable compensation therefor. [See Amendments, Arts. 
XXXIX, XLIII, XLVII, XLVIII, The Initiative, II, sect. 2. 
LXIX, L and LI.] 

Art. XI. Every subject of the Commonwealth ought to 
find a certain remedy, by having recourse to the laws, for all 
injuries or wrongs which he may receive in his person, property, 
or character. He ought to obtain right and justice freely, and 
without being obliged to purchase it ; completely, and without 
any denial; promptly, and without delay ; conformably to the 
laws. 

Art. XII. No subject shall be held to answer for any 
crimes or offence, until the same is fully and plainly, substan- 
tially and formally, described to him; or be compelled to 
accuse, or furnish evidence against himself. And every sub- 
ject shall have a right to produce all proofs, that may be favor- 
able to him; to meet the witnesses against him face to face, 
and to be fully heard in his defence by himself, or his counsel, 
at his election. And no subject shall be arrested, imprisoned, 
despoiled, or deprived of his property, immunities, or privileges, 
put out of the protection of the law, exiled, or deprived of his 
life, liberty, or estate, but by the judgment of his peers, or 
the law of the land. 

And the legislature shall not make any law, that shall subject 
any person to a capital or infamous punishment, excepting for 
the government of the army and navy, without trial by jury. 
[See Amendments, Art. XLVIII, The Initiative, II, sect. 2.] 

Art. XIII. In criminal prosecutions, the verification of 
facts in the vicinity where they happen, is one of the greatest 
securities of the life, liberty, and property of the citizen. 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 53 

Art. XIV. Every subject has a right to be secure from all 
unreasonable searches, and seizures, of his person, his houses, 
his papers, and all his possessions. All warrants, therefore, 
are contrary to this right, if the cause or foundation of them 
be not previously supported by oath or affirmation; and if the 
order in the warrant to a civil officer, to make search in sus- 
pected places, or to arrest one or more suspected persons, or to 
seize their property, be not accompanied with a special desig- 
nation of the persons or objects of search, arrest, or seizure: 
and no warrant ought to be issued but in cases, and with the 
formalities prcvscribed by the laws. [See Amendments, Art. 
XLVIII. The Initiative, II, sect. 2.] 

Art. XV. In all controversies concerning property, and in 
all suits between two or more persons, except in cases in which 
it has heretofore been otherways used and practised, the 
parties have a right to a trial by jury; and this method of pro- 
cedure shall be held sacred, unless, in causes arising on the high 
seas, and such as relate to mariners' wages, the legislature shall 
hereafter find it necessary to alter it. [See Amendments, 
Art. XLVIII, The Initiative, II, sect. 2.] 

Art. XVI. [The liberty of the press is essential to the 
security of freedom in a state: it ought not, therefore, to be 
restrained in this Commonwealth.] [See Amendments. Art. 
XLVIII, The Initiative, II, sect. 2.] [Annulled and super- 
seded by Amendments, Art, LXXVIL] 

Art. XVII. The people have a right to keep and to bear 
arms for the common defence. And as, in time of peace, armies 
are dangerous to liberty, they ought not to be maintained with- 
out the consent of the legislature; and the military power shall 
always be held in an exact subordination to the civil authority, 
and be governed by it. 

Art. XVIII. A frequent recurrence to the fundamental 
principles of the constitution, and a constant adherence to 
those of piety, justice, moderation, temperance, industry, and 
frugality, are absolutely necessary to preserve the advantages 
of liberty, and to maintain a free government. The people 
ought, consequently, to have a particular attention to all those 



54 Constitution of Massachusetts. 

principles, in the choice of their officers and representatives: 
and they have a right to require of their lawgivers and magis- 
trates an exact and constant observance of them, in the forma- 
tion and execution of the laws necessary for the good admin- 
istration of the Commonwealth. 

Art. XIX. The people have a right, in an orderly and 
peaceable manner, to assemble to consult upon the common 
good : give instructions to their representatives, and to request 
of the legislative body, by the way of addresses, petitions, or 
remonstrances, redress of the wrongs done them, and of the 
grievances they suffer. [See Amendments, Art. XLVIII, The 
Initiative, II, sect. 2.] 

Art. XX. The power of suspending the laws, or the execu- 
tion of the laws, ought never to be exercised but by the legis- 
lature, or by authority derived from it, to be exercised in such 
particular cases only as the legislature shall expressly provide 
for. [See Amendments, Art. XLVIII, I. Definition.] 

Art. XXI. The freedom of deliberation, speech and de- 
bate, in either house of the legislature, is so essential to the 
rights of the people, that it cannot be the foundation of any 
accusation or prosecution, action or complaint, in any other 
court or place whatsoever. [See Amendments, Art. XLVIII, 
The Initiative, II, sect. 2.] 

Art. XXII. The legislature ought frequently to assemble 
for the redress of grievances, for correcting, strengthening and 
confirming the laws, and for making new laws, as the common 
good may require. 

Art. XXIII. No subsidy, charge, tax, impost, or duties, 
ought to be established, fixed, laid, or levied, under any pretext 
whatsoever, without the consent of the people or their repre- 
sentatives in the legislature. 

Art. XXIV. Laws made to punish for actions done before 
the existence of such laws, and which have not been declared 
crimes by preceding laws, are unjust, oppressive, and incon- 
sistent with the fundamental principles of a free government. 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 55 

Art. XXV. No subject ought, in anj' case, or in any time, 
to be declared guilty of treason or felony by the legislature. 

Art. XXVI. No magistrate or court of law, shall demand 
excessive bail or sureties, impose excessive fines, or inflict cruel 
or unusual punishments. [See Amendments, Art. XLVIII, 
The Initiative, II, sect. 2.] 

Art. XXVII. In time of peace, no soldier ought to be quar- 
tered in any house without the consent of the owner; and in 
time of war, such quarters ought not to be made but by the 
civil magistrate, in a manner ordained by the legislature. 

Art. XXVIII. No person can in any case be subjected to 
law-martial, or to any penalties or pains, by virtue of that 
law, except those employed in the army or navy, and except 
the militia in actual service, but by authority of the legislature. 
[See Amendments, Art. XLVIII, The Initiative, II, sect. 2.] 

Art. XXIX. It is essential to the preservation of the rights 
of every individual, his life, liberty, property and character, 
that there be an impartial interpretation of the laws, and ad- 
ministration of justice. It is the right of every citizen to be 
tried by judges as free, impartial and independent as the lot 
of humanity will admit. It is, therefore, not only the best 
policy, but for the security of the rights of the people, and of 
every citizen, that the judges of the supreme judicial court 
should hold their offices as long as they behave themselves 
well; and that they should have honorable salaries ascertained 
and established by standing laws. [See Amendments, Art. 
XLVIII, The Initiative, II, sect. 2, and The Referendum, III. 
sect. 2.] 

Art. XXX. In the government of this Commonwealth, the 
legislative department shall never exercise the executive and 
judicial powers, or either of them: the executive shall never 
exercise the legislative and judicial powers, or either of them: 
the judicial shall never exercise the legislative and executive 
powers, or either of them: to the end it may be a government 
of laws and not of men. 



56 Constitution of Massachusetts. 



PART THE SECOND. 

The Frame of Government. 

The people, inhabiting the territory formerly called the 
Province of Massachusetts Bay, do hereby solemnly and mu- 
tually agree with each other, to form themselves into a free, 
sovereign, and independent body politic, or state, by the name 
of The Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 



Chapter T. 

THE LEGISLATIVE POWER. 

Section I. 

The General Court. 

Article I. The department of legislation shall be formed 
by two branches, a Senate and House of Representatives: each 
of which shall have a negative on the other. 

The legislative body shall assemble every year [on the last 
Wednesday in May, and at such other times as they shall judge 
necessary; and shall dissolve and be dissolved on the day 
next preceding the said last Wednesday in May;] and shall 
be stiled, The General Court of Massachusetts. [See 
Amendments. Arts. X, LXXII and LXXV.] 

Art. II. No bill or resolve of the senate or house of repre- 
sentatives shall become a law, and have force as such, until it 
shall have been laid before the governor for his revisal; and 
if he, upon such revision, approve thereof he shall signify his 
approbation by signing the same. But if he have any objection 
to the passing of such bill or resolve, he shall return the same, 
together with his objections thereto, in writing, to the senate 
or house of representatives, in whichsoever the same shall have 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 57 

originated: who shall enter the objections sent down by the 
governor, at large, on their records, and proceed to reconsider 
the said bill or resolve. But if after such reconsideration, two 
thirds of the said senate or house of representatives, shall, 
notwithstanding the said objections, agree to pass the same, it 
shall, together with the objections, be sent to the other branch 
of the legislature, where it shall also be reconsidered, and if 
approved by two thirds of the members present, shall have the 
force of a law: but in all such cases, the votes of both houses 
shall be determined by yeas and nays; and the names of the 
persons voting for, or against, the said bill or resolve, shall be 
entered upon the public records of the Commonwealth. 

And in order to prevent unnecessary delays, if any bill or re- 
solve shall not be returned by the governor within five days 
after it shall have been presented, the same shall have the 
force of a law. [See Amendments, Arts. I, XLVIII, LVI and 
LXIII, sect. 5.] 

Art. III. The general court shall forever have full power 
and authority to erect and constitute judicatories and courts of 
record, or other courts, to be held in the name of the Common- 
wealth, for the hearing, trying, and determining of all manner 
of crimes, offences, pleas, processes, plaints, actions, matters, 
causes and things, whatsoever, arising or happening within the 
Commonwealth, or between or concerning persons inhabiting, 
or residing, or brought within the same, whether the same be 
criminal or civil, or whether the said crimes be capital or not 
capital, and whether the said pleas be real, personal, or mixed; 
and for the awarding and making out of execution thereupon. 
To which courts and judicatories are hereby given and granted 
full power and authority, from time to time, to administer 
oaths or affirmations, for the better discovery of truth in any 
matter in controversy or depending before them. [See Amend- 
ments, Art. XLVIII, The Initiative, II, sect. 2, and The Refer- 
endum, III, sect. 2.] 

Art. IV. And further, full power and authority are hereby 
given and granted to the said general court, from time to time, 
to make, ordain, and establish, all manner of wholesome and 



58 Constitution of Massachusetts. 

reasonable orders, laws, statutes, and ordinances, directions 
and instructions, either with penalties or without; so as the 
same be not repugnant or contrary to this constitution, as they 
shall judge to be for the good and welfare of this Common- 
wealth, and for the government and ordering thereof, and of the 
subjects of the same, and for the necessary support and defence 
of the government thereof; and to name and settle annually, 
or provide by fixed laws, for the naming and settling all civil 
officers within the said Commonwealth; the election and con- 
stitution of whom are not hereafter in this form of government 
othen^'ise provided for; and to set forth the several duties, 
powers and limits, of the several civil and military officers of 
this Commonwealth, and the forms of such oaths or affirma- 
tions as shall be respectively administered unto them for the 
execution of their several offices and places, so as the same be 
not repugnant or contrary to this constitution; and to impose 
and levy proportional and reasonable assessments, rates and 
taxes, upon all the inhabitants of, and persons resident, and 
estates lying, within the said Commonwealth; and also to 
impose and levy, reasonable duties and excises, upon any 
produce, goods, wares, merchandise, and commodities, what- 
soever, brought into, produced, manufactured, or being within 
the same; to be issued and disposed of by warrant, under the 
hand of the governor of this Commonwealth for the time being, 
with the advice and consent of the council, for the public 
service, in the necessary defence and support of the govern- 
ment of the said Commonwealth, and the protection and 
preservation of the subjects thereof, according to such acts 
as are or shall be in force within the same. 

And while the public charges of government, or any part 
thereof, shall be assessed on polls and estates, in the manner 
that has hitherto been practised, in order that such assess- 
ments may be made with equality, there shall be a valuation of 
estates within the Commonwealth taken anew once in every 
ten years at least, and as much oftener as the general court 
shall order. [See Amendments, Arts. XLI and XLIV.] 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 59 

[For the authority of the general court to charter cities and establish 
limited town meeting form of government, see Amendments Arts. II 
and LXX. 

For power of the general court to establish voting precincts in towns, 
see Amendments, Art. XXIX. 

For additional taxing power given to the general court, see Amend- 
ments, Arts. XLI and XLIV. 

For the authority of the general court to talie land, etc., for relieving 
congestion of population and providing homes for citizens, see Amend- 
ments, Art. XLIII. 

For the power given the general court to provide by law for absentee 
and compulsory voting, see Amendments, Arts. XLV, LXI and 
LXXVI. 

For the power given the general court to determine the manner of 
providing and distributing the necessaries of life, etc., during time of 
war, public distress, etc., by the Commonwealth and the cities and 
towns therein, see Amendments. Art. LXVII. 

For provisions affecting procedure in the general court in connection 
with Initiative and Referendum measures, see Amendments, Arts. 
XLVIII, LXXIV and LXXXI. 

For provisions relative to taking the vote on emergency measures 
see Amendments, Arts. XLVIII, The Referendum, II, and LXVII. 

For new provisions authorizing the general court to provide for the 
taking of lands for certain public uses, see Amendments, Art. XLIX. 

For provision authorizing the general court to take a recess or re- 
cesses amounting to not more than thirty days, see Amendments, 
Art. LI I. 

For new provision authorizing the governor to return a bill with a 
recommendation of amendment, see Amendments, Art. LVI. 

For the power of the general court to limit the use or construction 
of buildings, see Amendments, Art. LX. 

For new provisions relative to the biennial election of senators and 
representatives and their terms of office, see Amendments, Art. LXIV. 

For new provisions that no person elected to the general court 
shall be appointed to any office which was created or the emoluments 
of which were increased during the term for which he was elected, nor 
received additional salary or compensation for service upon recess com- 
mittees or commissions, see Amendments, Art. LXV. 

For the power given the general court to prescribe the terms and 
conditions upon which a pardon may be granted in the case of a felony, 
see Amendments, Art. LXXIII.] 



60 Constitution of Massachusetts. 



Chapter I. 
Section II. 

Senate. 

Article I. [There shall be annually elected, by the free- 
holders and other inhabitants of this Commonwealth, qualified 
as in this constitution is provided, fortj' persons to be council- 
lors and senators for the year ensuing their election; to be 
chosen by the inhabitants of the districts into which the Com- 
monwealth may from time to time be divided by the general 
court for that purpose: and the general court in assigning the 
numbers to be elected by the respective districts, shall govern 
themselves by the proportion of the public taxes paid by the 
said districts; and timely make known to the inhabitants of 
the Commonwealth the limits of each district, and the number 
of councillors and senators to be chosen therein; provided that 
the number of such districts shall never be less than thirteen; 
and that no district be so large as to entitle the same to choose 
more than six senators. [See Amendments, Arts. XIII, XVI, 
XXII, LXIV and LXXL] 

And the several counties in this Commonwealth shall, until 
the general court shall determine it necessary to alter the said 
districts, be districts for the choice of councillors and senators, 
(except that the counties of Dukes County and Nantucket shall 
form one district for that purpose) and shall elect the following 
number for councillors and senators, viz.: — Suffolk, six; 
Essex, six; Middlesex, five; Hampshire, four; Plymouth, 
three; Barnstable, one; Bristol, three; York, two; Dukes 
County and Nantucket, one; Worcester, five; Cumberland, 
one; Lincoln, one; Berkshire, two.] 

Art. II. The senate shall be the first branch of the legisla- 
ture; and the senators shall be chosen in the following manner, 
viz.: there shall be a meeting on the [first Monday in April,] 
[annually], forever, of the inhabitants of each town in the sev- 
eral counties of this Commonwealth; to be called by the select- 
men, and warned in due course of law, at least seven days 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 61 

before the [first Monday in April,] for the purpose of electing 
persons to be senators and councillors; [and at such meetings 
every male inhabitant of twenty-one years of age and upwards, 
having a freehold estate within the Commonwealth, of the an- 
nual income of three pounds, or any estate of the value of sixty 
pounds, shall have a right to give in his vote for the senators for 
the district of which he is an inhabitant.] And to remove all 
doubts concerning the meaning of the word "inhabitant" in 
this constitution, every person shall be considered as an in- 
habitant, for the purpose of electing and being elected into any 
office, or place within this state, in that town, district or 
plantation, where he dwelleth, or hath his home. [See Amend- 
ments. Arts. II. III. X, XV, XX. XXII, XXIII, XXVI, 
XXVIII, XXX, XXXI, XXXII, XLV, LXIV, LXXI, 
LXXVI and LXXX.] 

The selectmen of the several towns shall preside at such 
meetings impartially; and shall receive the votes of all the in- 
habitants of such towns present and qualified to vote for sena- 
tors, and shall sort and count them in open town meeting, and 
in presence of the town clerk, who shall make a fair record, in 
presence of the selectmen, and in open town meeting, of the 
name of every person voted for, and of the number of votes 
against his name: and a fair copy of this record shall be at- 
tested by the selectmen and the town clerk, and shall be sealed 
up, directed to the secretary of the Commonwealth for the time 
being, with a superscription, expressing the purport of the con- 
tents thereof, and delivered by the town clerk of such towns, 
to the sheriff of the county in which such town lies, thirty days 
at least before [the last Wednesday in May] [annually]; or it 
shall be delivered into the secretary's office seventeen days at 
least before the said [last Wednesday in May:] and the sheriff 
of each county shall deliver all such certificates by him re- 
ceived, into the vsecretary's office, seventeen days before the 
said [last Wednesday in May]. [See Amendments, Arts. II 
and X.] 

And the inhabitants of plantations unincorporated, ciualified 
as this constitution provides, who are or shall be empowered 
and required to assess taxes upon themselves toward the sup- 
port of government, shall have the same privilege of voting for 



62 Constitution of Alassachusetts. 

councillors and senators in the plantations where they reside, 
as town inhabitants have in their respective towns; [and the 
plantation meetings for that purpose shall be held annually on 
the same first Monday in April], at such place in the planta- 
tions respectively, as the assessors thereof shall direct; which 
assessors shall have like authority for notifying the electors, 
collecting and returning the votes, as the selectmen and town 
clerks have in their several towns, by this constitution. And 
all other persons living in places unincorporated (qualified as 
aforesaid) who shall be assessed to the support of government 
by the assessors of an adjacent town, shall have the privilege 
of giving in their votes for councillors and senators in the town 
where they shall be assessed, and be notified of the place of 
meeting by the selectmen of the town where they shall be 
assessed, for that purpose accordingly. [See Amendments, 
Arts. XV and LXIV.] 

Art. III. And that there may be a due convention of sena- 
tors on the [last Wednesday in May] [annually,] the governor 
with five of the council, for the time being, shall, as soon as 
may be, examine the return copies of such records; and four- 
teen days before the said day he shall issue his summons to such 
persons as shall appear to be chosen by [a majority of] voters, 
to attend on that day, and take their seats accordingly: iJto- 
vided nevertheless, that for the first year the said return 
copies shall be examined by the president and five of the coun- 
cil of the former constitution of government; and the said 
president shall, in like manner, issue his summons to the per- 
sons so elected, that they may take their seats as aforesaid. 
[See Amendments, Arts. X, XIV. LXIV, LXXII and LXXV.] 

Art. IV. The senate shall be the final judge of the elec- 
tions, returns and qualifications of their own members, as 
pointed out in the constitution; and shall, [on the said last 
Wednesday in May] [annually.] determine and declare who are 
elected by each district to be senators [by a majority of votes: 
and in case there shall not appear to be the full number of sen- 
ators returned elected by a majority of votes for any district, 
the deficiency shall be supplied in the following manner, viz.: 
The members of the house of representatives, and such senators 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 63 

as shall be declared elected, shall take the names of such per- 
sons as shall be found to have the highest number of votes in 
such district, and not elected, amounting to twice the number 
of senators wanting, if there be so many voted for; and out of 
these shall elect by ballot a number of senators sufficient to fill 
up the vacancies in such district; and in this manner all such 
vacancies shall be filled up in every district of the Common- 
wealth; and in like manner all vacancies in the senate, arising 
by death, removal out of the state, or otherwise, shall be sup- 
plied as soon as may be, after such vacancies shall happen.] 
[See Amendments. Arts. X, XIV and XXIV.] 

Art. V. Provided nevertheless, that no person shall be 
capable of being elected as a senator, [who is not seised in his 
own right of a freehold within this Commonwealth, of the 
value of three hundred pounds at least, or possessed of personal 
estate to the value of six hundred pounds at least, or of both to 
the amount of the same sum, and] who has not been an inhab- 
itant of this Commonwealth for the space of five years imme- 
diately preceding his election, and at the time of his election, 
he shall be an inhabitant in the district for which he shall be 
chosen. [See Amendments, Arts. XIII, XXII and LXXL] 

Art. VI. The senate shall have power to adjourn them- 
selves, provided such adjournments do not exceed two days 
at a time. [See Amendments, Art. LII.] 

Art. VII. The senate shall choose its own president, ap- 
point its own officers, and determine its own rules of pro- 
ceedings. 

Art. VIII. The senate shall be a court with full authority 
to hear and determine all impeachments made by the house of 
representatives, against any officer or officers of the Common- 
wealth, for misconduct and mal-administration in their offices. 
But previous to the trial of every impeachment the members 
of the senate shall respectively be sworn, truly and impartially 
to try and determine the charge in question, according to evi- 
dence. Their judgment, however shall not extend further 



64 Constitution of Massachusetts. 

than to removal from office and disqualification to fiold or 
enjoy any place of honor, trust, or profit, under this Common- 
wealth: but the party so convicted, shall be, nevertheless, 
liable to indictment, trial, judgment, and punishment, accord- 
ing to the laws of the land. 

Art. IX. [Not less than sixteen members of the senate 
shall constitute a quorum for doing business.] [See Amend- 
ments. Arts. XXII and XXXIIL] 



Chapter I. 



Section III. 

House of Representatives . 

Article I. There shall be. in the legislature of this com- 
monwealth, a representation of the people, [annually] elected, 
and founded upon the principle of equality. [See Amend- 
ments, Art. LXIV.] 

Art. II. [And in order to provide for a representation of 
the citizens of this Commonwealth, founded upon the principle 
of equality, every corporate town containing one hundred and 
fifty ratable polls, may elect one representative; every cor- 
porate town, containing three hundred and seventy-five ratable 
polls, may elect two representatives; every corporate town 
containing six hundred ratable polls may elect three repre- 
sentatives; and proceeding in that manner, making two hun- 
dred and twenty-five ratable polls, the mean increasing num- 
ber for every additional representative. [See Amendments, 
Arts. XII, XIII, XXI and LXXL] 

Provided nevertheless, that each town now incorporated, 
not having one hundred and fifty ratable polls, may elect one 
representative: but no place shall hereafter be incorporated 
with the privilege of electing a representative, unless there 
are within the same one hundred and fifty ratable polls.] 

And the house of representatives shall have power from time 
to time to impose fines upon such towns as shall neglect to 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 65 

choose and return members to the same, agreeably to this 
constitution. 

[The expenses of travelling to the general assembly, and 
returning home, once in every session, and no more, shall be 
paid by the government, out of the public treasury, to every 
member who shall attend as seasonably as he can, in the judg- 
ment of the house, and does not depart without leave.] [See 
Amendments, Art. XXXV.] 

Art. III. Every member of the house of representatives 
shall be chosen by written vote; [and for one year at least 
next preceding his election, shall have been an inhabitant of, 
and have been seised in his own right of a freehold of the value 
of one hundred pounds within the town he shall be chosen to 
represent, or any ratable estate to the value of two hundred 
pounds; and he shall cease to represent the said town imme- 
diately on his ceasing to be qualified as aforesaid.] [See 
Amendments. Arts. XIII, XXI and LXXL] 

Art. IV. [Every male person, being twenty-one years of 
age, and resident in any particular town in this Commonwealth 
for the space of one year next preceding, having a freehold 
estate within the same town of the annual income of three 
pounds, or any estate of the value of sixty pounds, shall have a 
right to vote in the choice of a representative, or representa- 
tives for the said town.] [See Amendments, Arts. Ill, XX, 
XXIII. XXVI, XXVIII, XXX, XXXI, XXXII, XLV and 
LXXVI] 

Art. V. [The members of the house of representatives shall 
be chosen annually in the month of May. ten days at least 
before the last Wednesday of that month ] [See Amendments, 
Arts. X, XV and LXIV.] 

Art. VI. The house of representatives shall be the grand 
inquest of this Commonwealth; and all impeachments made 
by them shall be heard and tried by the senate. 

Art. VII. All money bills shall originate in the house of 
representatives; but the senate may propose or concur with 
amendments, as on other bills. 



66 Constitution of Massachusetts. 

Art. VIII. The house of representatives shall have power 
to adjourn themselves; provided such adjournment shall not 
exceed two daj-s at a time. [See Amendments, Art. LII.] 

Art. IX. [Not less than sixty members of the house of rep- 
resentatives, shall constitute a quorum for doing business. 
[See Amendments, Arts. XXI and XXXIII.] 

Art. X. The house of representatives shall be the judge of 
the returns, elections, and qualifications of its owm members, 
as pointed out in the constitution; shall choose their own 
speaker; appoint their own officers, and settle the rules and 
orders of proceeding in their own house. They shall have 
authority to punish by imprisonment, every person, not a 
member, who shall be guilty of disrespect to the house, by any 
disorderly, or contemptuous behavior in its presence; or who, 
in the town where the general court is sitting, and during the 
time of its sitting, shall threaten harm to the body or estate of 
any of its members, for any thing said or done in the house; 
or who shall assault any of them therefor; or who shall assault, 
or arrest, any witness, or other person, ordered to attend the 
house, in his way in going or returning; or who shall rescue 
any person arrested by the order of the house. 

And no member of the house of representatives shall be 
arrested, or held to bail on mesne process, during his going 
unto, returning from, or his attending the general assembly. 

Art. XI. The senate shall have the same powers in the 
like cases; and the governor and council shall have the same 
authority to punish in like cases. Provided that no imprison- 
ment on the warrant or order of the governor, council, senate, 
or house of representatives, for either of the above described 
offences, be for a term exceeding thirty days. 

And the senate and house of representatives may try and 
determine all cases where their rights and privileges are con- 
cerned, and which, by the constitution, they have authority to 
try and determine, by committees of their own members, or in 
such other way as they may respectively think best. 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 67 



Chapter II. 
EXECUTIVE POWER. 

Section I. 

Governor. 

Article I. There shall be a supreme executive magistrate, 
who shall be styled — The Governor of the Common- 
wealth OF Massachusetts; and whose title shall be — His 
Excellency. 

Art. II. The governor shall be chosen [annually]: and no 
person shall be eligible to this office, unless at the time of hia 
election, he shall have been an inhabitant of this Common- 
wealth for seven years next preceding; [and unless he shall 
at the same time, be seised, in his own right, of a freehold 
within the Commonwealth of the value of one thousand 
pounds; and unless he shall declare himself to be of the 
Christian religion.] [See Amendments, Arts. VII, XXXIV, 
LXIV and LXXX.] 

Art. III. Those persons who shall be qualified to vote for 
senators and representatives within the several towns of this 
Commonwealth shall, at a meeting to be called for that pur- 
pose, on the [first Monday of April annually], give in their votes 
for a governor, to the selectmen, who shall preside at such 
meetings; and the town clerk, in the presence and with the as- 
sistance of the selectmen, shall, in open town meeting, sort and 
count the votes, and form a list of the persons voted for, with 
the number of votes for each person against his name; and 
shall make a fair record of the same in the town books, and a 
public declaration thereof in the said meeting; and shall, in 
the presence of the inhabitants, seal up copies of the said list, 
attested by him and the selectmen, and transmit the same to 
the sheriff of the county, thirty days at least before the [last 
Wednesday in May]; and the sheriff shall transmit the same 
to the secretary's office, seventeen days at least before the 



68 Constitution of Massachusetts. 

said [last Wednesday in May]; or the selectmen may cause 
returns of the same to be made to the office of the secretary of 
the Commonwealth, seventeen days at least before the said 
day; and the secretary shall lay the same before the senate and 
the house of representatives, on the [last Wednesday in May], 
to be by them examined: and in case of an election by a 
[majority] of all the votes returned, the choice shall be by 
them declared and published. But if no person shall have a 
[majority] of votes, the house of representatives shall, by ballot, 
elect two out of four persons who had the highest number of 
votes, if so many shall have been voted for; but, if otherwise, 
out of the number voted for; and make return to the senate 
of the two persons so elected; on which the senate shall pro- 
ceed, by ballot, to elect one, who shall be declared governor. 
[See Amendments, Arts. II, X. XIV, XV, XLV. LXIV, 
LXXVI and LXXX.] 

Art. IV. The governor shall have authority from time to 
time, at his discretion, to assemble and call together the coun- 
cillors of this Commonwealth for the time being; and the gov- 
ernor with the said councillors, or five of them at least, shall, 
and may, from time to time, hold and keep a council, for the 
ordering and directing the affairs of the Commonwealth, agree- 
ably to the constitution and the laws of the land. 

Art. V. The governor, with advice of council, shall have 
full power and authority, during the session of the general 
court to adjourn or prorogue the same to any time the two 
houses shall desire; [and to dissolve the same on the day next 
preceding the last Wednesday in May;] and, in the recess of the 
said court, to prorogue the same from time to time, not exceed- 
ing ninety days in any one recess; and to call it together sooner 
than the time to which it may be adjourned or prorogued, if 
the welfare of the Commonwealth shall require the same: and 
in case of any infectious distemper prevailing in the place 
where the said court is next at any time to convene, or any 
other cause happening whereby danger may arise to the health 
or lives of the members from their attendance, he may direct 
the session to be held at some other the most convenient 
place within the state. 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 69 

[And the governor shall dissolve the said general court on 
the day next preceding the last Wednesday in May.] [See 
Amendments, Arts. X, LXXII and LXXV.] 

Art. VI. In cases of disagreement between the two houses, 
with regard to the necessity, expediency or time of adjourn- 
ment, or prorogation, the governor, with advice of the council, 
shall have a right to adjourn or prorogue the general court, not 
exceeding ninety days, as he shell determine the public good 
shall require. 

Art. VII. [The governor of this Commonwealth for the 
time being, shall be the commander-in-chief of the army and 
navy, and of all the military forces of the state, by sea and land; 
and shall have full power by himself, or by any commander, 
or other officer or officers, from time to time, to train, instruct, 
exercise and govern the militia and navy; and. for the special 
defence and safety of the Commonwealth, to assemble in mar- 
tial array, and put in warlike posture, the inhabitants thereof, 
and to lead and conduct them, and with them, to encounter, 
repel, resist, expel and pursue, by force of arms, as well by sea 
as by land, within or without the limits of this Commonwealth, 
and also to kill, slay, and destroy, if necessary, and conquer, by 
all fitting ways, enterprises, and means whatsoever, all and 
every such person and persons as shall, at any time hereafter, 
in a hostile manner, attempt or enterprise the destruction, in- 
vasion, detriment, or annoyance of this Commonwealth; and 
to use and exercivSe, over the army and navy, and over the mili- 
tia in actual service, the law martial, in time of war or invasion, 
and also in time of rebellion, declared by the legislature to exist, 
as occasion shall necessarily require; and to take and surprise 
by all ways and means whatsoever, all and every such person or 
persons, with their ships, arms, ammunition and other goods, 
as shall, in a hostile manner, invade, or attempt the invading, 
conquering, or annoying this Commonwealth; and that the 
governor be intrusted with all these and other powers, incident 
to the offices of captain-general and commander-in-chief, and 
admiral, to be exercised agreeably to the rules and regulations 
of the constitution, and the laws of the land, and not other- 
wise. 



70 Constitution of Massachusetts. 

Provided, that the said governor shall not, at any time here- 
after, by virtue of any power by this constitution granted, or 
hereafter to be granted to him by the legislature, transport any 
of the inhabitants of this Commonwealth, or oblige them to 
march out of the limits of the same, without their free and 
voluntary consent, or the consent of the general court; except 
so far as may be necessary to march or transport them by land 
or water, for the defence of such part of the state to which they 
cannot otherwise conveniently "have access.] [Annulled and 
superseded by Amendments, Art. LIV.] 

Art. VIII. [The power of pardoning offences, except such 
as persons may be convicted of before the senate by an im- 
peachment of the house, shall be in the governor, by and with 
the advice of council: but no charter of pardon, granted by 
the governor, with advice of the council before conviction, 
shall avail the part}' pleading the same, notwithstanding any 
general or particular expressions contained therein, descrip- 
tive of the offence or offences intended to be pardoned.] 
[Annulled and superseded by Amendments, Art. LXXIIL] 

Art. IX. All judicial officers, [the attorney-general,] the 
solicitor-general, [all sheriffs,] coroners, [and registers of pro- 
bate,] shall be nominated and appointed by the governor, by 
and with the advice and consent of the council; and every 
such nomination shall be made by the governor, and made at 
least seven days prior to such appointment. [See Amendments, 
Arts. XVII, XLVIII, The Initiative. II, sect. 2, The Referen- 
dum, III, sect. 2, and LXIV.] [For provision as to election 
of sheriffs, registers of probate, etc., see Amendments, Art. 
XIX.] [For provision as to appointment of notaries public, 
see Amendments, Arts. IV, LVII and LXIX, sect. 2.] 

Art. X. [The captains and subalterns of the militia shall 
be elected by the written votes of the train-band and alarm list 
of their respective companies, of twenty-one years of age and 
upwards: the field officers of regiments shall be elected by the 
written votes of the captains and subalterns of their respective 
regiments: the brigadiers shall be elected in like manner, by 
the field officers of their respective brigades: and such officers. 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 71 

so elected, shall be commissioned by the governor, who shall 
determine their rank, [See Amendments, Art. V.] 

The legislature shall, by standing laws, direct the time and 
manner of convening the electors, and of collecting votes, and 
of certifying to the governor, the officers elected. 

The major-generals shall be appointed by the senate and 
house of representatives, each having a negative upon the 
other; and be commissioned by the governor. [See Amend- 
ments, Art. IV.] 

And if the electors of brigadiers, field officers, captains or 
subalterns, shall neglect or refuse to make such elections, after 
being duly notified, according to the laws for the time being, 
then the governor, with advice of council, shall appoint suitable 
persons to fill such offices. 

And no officer, duly commissioned to command in the 
militia, shall be removed from his office, but by the address of 
both houses to the governor, or by fair trial in court-martial 
pursuant to the laws of the Commonwealth for the time being. 
[See Amendments, Art. IV.] 

The commanding officers of regiments shall appoint their 
adjutants and quartermasters; the brigadiers their brigade- 
majors; and the major-generals their aids; and the governor 
shall appoint the adjutant-general. 

The governor, with advice of council, shall appoint all officers 
of the continental army, whom by the confederation of the 
United States it is provided that this Commonwealth shall 
appoint, as also all officers of forts and garrisons. 

The divisions of the militia into brigades, regiments and 
companies, made in pursuance of the militia laws now in force, 
shall be considered as the proper divisions of the militia of this 
Commonwealth, until the same shall be altered in pursuance 
of some future law] [Annulled and superseded by Amend- 
ments, Art. LIII.] 

Art. XI. No moneys shall be issued out of the treasury of 
this Commonwealth, and disposed of (except such sums as may 
be appropriated for the redemption of bills of credit or treas- 
urer's notes, or for the payment of interest arising thereon) but 
by warrant under the hand of the governor for the time being, 
with the advice and consent of the council, for the necessary 



72 Co7istitiition of Massachusetts. 

defence and support of the Commonwealth; and for the pro- 
tection and preservation of the inhabitants thereof, agreeably 
to the acts and resolves of the general court. [See Amend- 
ments, Art. XLVIII, The Initiative, II, sect. 2, and The Refer- 
endum, III, sect. 2.] 

Art. XII. All public boards, [the commissary-general,] all 
superintending officers of public magazines and stores, belong- 
ing to this Commonwealth, and all commanding officers of forts 
and garrisons within the same, shall once in every three months, 
officially, and without requisition, and at other times, when 
required by the governor, deliver to him an account of all 
goods, stores, provisions, ammunition, cannon with their 
appendages, and small arms with their accoutrements, and 
all other public property whatever under their care respec- 
tively; distinguishing the quantity, number, quality and kind 
of each, as particularly as may be; together with the condi- 
tion of such forts and garrisons; and the said commanding 
officer shall exhibit to the governor, when required by him, 
true and exact plans of such forts, and of the land and sea or 
harbor or harbors adjacent. 

And the said boards, and all public officers, shall communi- 
cate to the governor, as soon as may be after receiving the 
same, all letters, despatches, and intelligences of a public 
nature, which shall be directed to them respectively. [See 
Amendments, Art. LIIL] 

Art. XIII. As the public good requires that the governor 
should not be under the undue influence of any of the members 
of the general court by a dependence on them for his support, 
that he should in all cases, act with freedom for the benefit of 
the public, that he should not have his attention necessarily 
diverted from that object to his private concerns, and that he 
should maintain the dignity of the Commonwealth in the char- 
acter of its chief magistrate, it is necessary that he should have 
an honorable stated salarj', of a fixed and permanent value, 
amply sufficient for those purposes, and established by stand- 
ing laws: and it shall be among the first acts of the general 
court, after the commencement of this constitution, to estab- 
lish such salary by law accordingly. 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 73 

Permanent and honorable salaries shall also be established 
by law for the justices of the supreme judicial court. 

And if it shall be found that any of the salaries aforesaid, so 
established, are insufficient, they shall, from time to time be 
enlarged as the general court shall judge proper. [See Amend- 
ments, Art. XLVIII, The Initiative, sect. 2, The Referen- 
dum, III, sect. 2.] 



Chapter II. 

Section II. 

LieTitenant-Governor. 

Article I. There shall be [annually] elected a lieutenant- 
governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, whose title 
shall be — His Honor; and who shall be qualified, in point of 
[religion, property,] and residence in the Commonwealth, in 
the same manner with the governor, and the day and manner 
of his election, and the qualifications of the electors, shall be 
the same as are required in the election of a governor. The 
return of the votes for this officer, and the declaration of his 
election, shall be in the same manner: and if no one person 
shall be found to have [a majority] of all the votes returned, the 
vacancy shall be filled by the senate and house of representa- 
tives, in the same manner as the governor is to be elected, in 
case no one person shall have [a majority] of the votes of 
the people to be governor. [See Amendments, Arts. VII, 
XIV, XXXIV, LXIV and LXXX.] 

Art. II. The governor, and in his absence the lieutenant- 
governor, shall be president of the council, but shall have no 
vote in council: and the lieutenant-governor shall always be a 
member of the council except when the chair of the governor 
shall be vacant. 

Art. III. Whenever the chair of the governor shall be 
vacant, by reason of his death, or absence from the Common- 
wealth, or otherwise, the lieutenant-governor, for the time 
being, shall, during such vacancy, perform all the duties incum- 
bent upon the governor, and shall have and exercise all the 



74 Constitution of Massachusetts. 

powers and authorities, which by this constitution the governor 
is vested with, when personally present. [See Amendments, 
Art. LV.J 

Chapter II. 

Section III, 
Council, and the Manner of settling Elections by the Legislature. 
Article I. There shall be a council for advising the gov- 
ernor in the executive part of government, to consist of 
tnine] persons besides the lieutenant-governor, whom the gov- 
ernor, for the time being, shall have full power and authority, 
from time to time, at his discretion, to assemble and call to- 
gether. And the governor, with the said councillors, or five 
of them at least, shall and may, from time to time, hold and 
keep a council, for the ordering and directing the affairs of the 
Commonwealth, according to the lav/s of the land. [See 
Amendments, Art. XVI.] 

Art. II. [Nine councillors shall be annually chosen from 
among the persons returned for councillors and senators, on the 
last Wednesday in May, by the joint ballot of the senators and 
representatives assembled in one room: and in case there shall 
not be found upon the first choice, the whole number of nine 
persons who will accept a seat in the council, the deficiency 
shall be made up by the electors aforesaid from among the 
people at large; and the number of senators left shall consti- 
tute the senate for the year. The seats of the persons thus 
elected from the senate, and accepting the trust, shall be 
vacated in the senate.] [See Amendments, Arts. X, XITI, 
XXV and LXIV.j [Superseded by Amendments. Art. XVI.] 

Art. III. The councillors, in the civil arrangements of the 
Commonwealth, shall have rank next after the lieutenant- 
governor. 

Art. IV. [Not more than two councillors shall be chosen 
out of any one district of this Commonwealth.] [Superseded 
by Amendments, Art. XVI.] 

Art. V. The resolutions and advice of the council shall be 
recorded in a register, and signed by the members present; and 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 75 

this record may be called for at any time by either house of 
the legislature; and any member of the council may insert his 
opinion, contrary to the resolution of the majority. 

Art. VI. [Whenever the office of the governor and lieu- 
tenant-governor shall be vacant, by reason of death, absence, 
or otherwise, then the council, or the major part of them, shall, 
during such vacancy have full power and authority to do, and 
execute, all and every such acts, matters and things, as the 
governor or the lieutenant-governor might or could, by virtue 
of this constitution, do or execute, if they, or either of chem, 
were personally present.] [Annulled and superseded by 
Amendments, Art. LV.] 

Art. VII. [And whereas the elections appointed to be 
made by this constitution, on the last Wednesday in Alay 
annually, by the two houses of the legislature, may not be 
completed on that day, the said elections may be adjourned 
from day to day until the same shall be completed. And the 
order of elections shall be as follows: the vacancies in the sen- 
ate, if any, shall first be filled up; the governor and lieutenant- 
governor shall then be elected, provided there should be no 
choice of them by the people: and afterwards the two houses 
shall proceed to the election of the council.] [See Amend- 
ments, Art. LXIV.] [Superseded by Amendments, Arts. XVI 
and XXV.l 



Chapter II. 

Section IV. 

Secretary, Treasurer, Commissary, etc. 

Article I. [The secretary, treasurer and receiver general, 
and the commissary-general, notaries public, and naval offi- 
cers, shall be chosen annually, by joint ballot of the senators 
and representatives in one room. And that the citizens of 
this Commonwealth may be assured, from time to time, that 
the moneys remaining in the public treasury, upon the settle- 



76 Constitution of Massachusetts. 

ment and liquidation of the public accounts, are their prop- 
erty, no man shall be eligible as treasurer and receiver general 
more than five years successively.] [See Amendments, Arts. 
XVII, LXIV, LXXIX and LXXX.] [For provision as to 
appointment of notaries public and the commissary-general, 
see Amendments, Arts. IV, LIII and LVII; see also Amend- 
ments, Art. LXIX.] 

Art. II. The records of the Commonwealth shall be kept 
in the office of the secretary, who may appoint his deputies, 
for whose conduct he shall be accountable, and he shall at- 
tend the governor and council, the senate and house of repre- 
sentatives, in person, or by his deputies, as they shall respec- 
tively require. 



Chapter III. 

JUDICIARY POWER. 

Article I. The tenure, that all commissioned officers shall 
by law have in their offices, shall be expressed in their respec- 
tive commissions. All judicial officers, duly appointed, com- 
missioned and sworn, shall hold their offices during good be- 
havior, excepting such concerning whom there is different 
provision made in this constitution: provided nevertheless, 
the governor, with consent of the council, may remove them 
upon the address of both houses of the legislature. [For tenure, 
etc. of judges, see Amendments, Art. XLVIII, The Initiative, 
II, sect. 2, and The Referendum, III, sect. 2.] [For retirement 
of judicial officers, see Amendments, Art. LVII I.] [For re- 
moval of justices of the peace and notaries public, see Amend- 
ments, Art. XXXVI I.] 

Art. II. Each branch of the legislature, as well as the 
governor and council, shall have authority to require the 
opinions of the justices of the supreme judicial court, upon 
important questions of law, and upon solemn occasions. 

Art. III. In order that the people may not suffer from the 
long continuance in place of any justice of the peace, who shall 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 77 

fail of discharging the important duties of his office with ability 
or fidelity, all commissions of justices of the peace shall expire 
and become void, in the term of seven years from their re- 
spective dates; and upon the expiration of any commission, 
the same may, if necessary, be renewed, or another person ap- 
pointed, as shall most conduce to the well-being of the com- 
monwealth. [See Amendments, Art. XXXVII.] 

Art. IV. The judges of probate of wills, and for granting 
letters of administration, shall hold their courts at such place 
or places, on fixed days, as the convenience of the people shall 
require. And the legislature shall from time to time, hereafter 
appoint such times and places; until which appointments, the 
said courts shall be holden at the times and places which the 
respective judges shall direct. 

Art. V. All causes of marriage, divorce, and alimony, and 
all appeals from the judges of probate shall be heard and de- 
termined by the governor and council, until the legislature 
shall, by law, make other provision. 



Chapter IV. 

DELEGATES TO CONGRESS. 

[The delegates of this Commonwealth to the congress of the 
United States, shall, some time in the month of June annually, 
be elected by the joint ballot of the senate and house of repre- 
sentatives, assembled together in one room; to serve in con- 
gress for one year, to commence on the first Monday in No- 
vember then next ensuing. They shall have commissions un- 
der the hand of the governor, and the great seal of the Com- 
monwealth; but may be recalled at any time within the year, 
and others chosen and commissioned, in the same manner, in 
their stead.] [Annulled by the adoption of the Constitution 
of the United States, July 26, 1788.] 



78 Constitution of Massachusetts. 



Chapter V. 

THE UNIVERSITY AT CAMBRIDGE, AND 
ENCOURAGEMENT OF LITERATURE. ETC. 

Section I. 

The University. 

Article I. Whereas our wise and pious ancestors, so early 
as the year one thousand six hundred and thirty-six, laid the 
foundation of Harvard College, in which university many per- 
sons of great eminence have, bj^ the blessing of God, been 
initiated in those arts and sciences, which qualified them for 
public employments, both in church and state: and whereas 
the encouragement of arts and sciences, and all good literature, 
tends to the honor of God, the advantage of the Christian 
religion, and the great benefit of this and the other United 
States of America — it is declared, that the President and 
Fellows of Harvard College, in their corporate capacity, 
and their successors in that capacity, their officers and serv- 
ants, shall have, hold, use, exercise and enjoy, all the powers, 
authorities, rights, liberties, privileges, immunities and fran- 
chises, which they now have, or are entitled to have, hold, use, 
exercise and enjoy: and the same are hereby ratified and con- 
firmed unto them, the said president and fellows of Harvard 
College, and to their successors, and to their officers and 
servants, respectively, forever. 

Art. II. And whereas there have been at sundry times, by 
divers persons, gifts, grants, devises of houses, lands, tene- 
ments, goods, chattels, legacies and conveyances, heretofore 
made, either to Harvard College in Cambridge, in New Eng- 
land, or to the president and fellows of Harvard College, or 
to the said college, by some other description, under several 
charters successively: it is declared: that all the said gifts, 
grants, devises, legacies and conveyances, are hereby forever 
confirmed unto the president and fellows of Harvard College, 
and to their successors in the capacity aforesaid, according to 
the true intent and meaning of the donor or donors, grantor 
or grantors, devisor or devisors. 



Constitution of Massachusetts, 79 

Art. III. [And whereas, by an act of the general court of 
the colony of Massachusetts Bay, passed in the year one thou- 
sand six hundred and forty-two, the governor and deputy- 
governor, for the time being, and all the magistrates of that 
jurisdiction, were, with the president, and a number of the 
clergy in the said act described, constituted the overseers of 
Harvard College: and it being necessary, in this new constitu- 
tion of government to ascertain who shall be deemed successors 
to the said governor, deputy-governor and magistrates: it is 
declared, that the governor, lieutenant-governor, council and 
senate of this Commonwealth, are, and shall be deemed, their 
successors, who with the president of Harvard College, for 
the time being, together with the ministers of the congrega- 
tional churches in the towns of Cambridge, Watertown, 
Charlestown, Boston, Roxbury, and Dorchester, mentioned 
in the said act, shall be, and hereby are, vested with all the 
powers and authority belonging, or in any way appertaining 
to the overseers of Harvard College; provided, that] nothing 
herein shall be construed to prevent the legislature of this 
Commonwealth from making such alterations in the govern- 
ment of the said university, as shall be conducive to its ad- 
vantage, and the interest of the republic of letters, in as full a 
manner as might have been done by the legislature of the late 
Province of the Massachusetts Bay. 



Chapter V. 

Section H. 

The Encouragement of Literature, etc. 

Wisdom and knowledge, as well as virtue, diffused generally 
among the body of the people, being necessary for the pres- 
ervation of their rights and liberties; and as these depend on 
spreading the opportunities and advantages of education in 
the various parts of the country, and among the different 
orders of the people, it shall be the duty of legislatures and 
magistrates, in all future periods of this Commonwealth, to 
cherish the interests of literature and the sciences, and all 
seminaries of them; especially the university at Cambridge, 



80 Constitution of Massachusetts. 

public schools and grammar schools in the towns; to en- 
courage private societies and public institutions, rewards and 
immunities, for the promotion of agriculture, arts, sciences, 
commerce, trades, manufactures, and a natural history of the 
country; to countenance and inculcate the principles of 
humanity and general benevolence, public and private charity, 
industry and frugality, honesty and punctuality in their 
dealings; sincerity, good humor, and all social affections, and 
generous sentiments among the people. [See Amendments, 
Arts. XVIII and XLVL] 



Chapter VI. 

OATHS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS; INCOMPATIBILITY OF AND EXCLU- 
SION FROM offices; pecuniary qualifications; com- 
missions; writs; confirmation of laws; habeas 
corpus; the enacting style; continuance of offi- 
cers; PROVISION for a future revisal of the consti- 
tution, etc. 

Article I. [Any person chosen governor, lieutenant-gov- 
ernor, councillor, senator, or representative, and accepting the 
trust, shall before he proceed to execute the duties of his place 
or office, make and subscribe the following declaration, viz.: 

"I, A. B., do declare, that I believe the Christian religion, 
and have a firm persuasion of its truth; and that I am seized 
and possessed, in my own right, of the property required by 
the constitution, as one qualification for the office or place to 
which I am elected." 

And the governor, lieutenant-governor, and councillors, shall 
make and subscribe the said declaration, in the presence of the 
two houses of assembly; and the senators and representatives, 
first elected under this constitution, before the president and 
five of the council of the former constitution, and forever after- 
wards before the governor and council for the time being.] 

And every person chosen to either of the places or offices 
aforesaid, as also any person appointed or commissioned to any 
judicial, executive, military, or other office under the govern- 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 81 

ment, shall, before he enters on the discharge of the business of 
his place or office, take and subscribe the following declaration, 
and oaths or affirmations, viz.: 

["I, A. B., do truly and sincerely acknowledge, profess, tes- 
tify, and declare, that the Commonwealth of Massachusetts is, 
and of right ought to be, a free, sovereign and independent 
state; and I do swear, that I will bear true faith and allegiance 
to the said Commonwealth, and that I will defend the same 
against traitorous conspiracies and all hostile attempts whatso- 
ever: and that I do renounce and abjure all allegiance, subjec- 
tion, and obedience to the king, queen, or government of Great 
Britain (as the case may be) and every other foreign power 
whatsoever: and that no foreign prince, person, prelate, state 
or potentate, hath, or ought to have, an}' jurisdiction, superior- 
ity, pre-eminence, authority, dispensing or other power, in any 
matter, civil, ecclesiastical or spiritual, within this Common- 
wealth, except the authority and power which is or may be 
vested by their constituents in the congress of the United 
States: and I do further testify and declare, that no man or 
body of men hath or can have any right to absolve or discharge 
me from the obligation of this oath, declaration, or affirmation 
and that I do make this acknowledgment, profession, testi- 
mony, declaration, denial, renunciation and abjuration, heart- 
ily and truly, according to the common meaning and accepta- 
tion of the foregoing words, without any equivocation, mental 
evasion, or secret reservation whatsoever. So help me God."] 

" I, A. B., do solemnly swear and affirm, that I will faithfully 
and impartially discharge and perform all the duties incumbent 
on me as ; according to the best of my abilities and under- 

standing, agreeably, to the rules and regulations of the consti- 
tution and the laws of this Commonwealth. So help me God." 

Provided always, that when any person chosen or appointed 
as aforesaid, shall be of the denomination of the people called 
Quakers, and shall decline taking the said oath[s], he shall 
make his affirmation in the foregoing form and subscribe the 
same, omitting the words ["/ do swear,'' "and abjure," "oath 
or," "and abjuration," in the first oath; and in the second oath, 
the words] "swear and," and [in each of them] the words "So 
help me God;" subjoining instead thereof, " This I do under the 



82 Constitution of Massachusetts. 

pains and penalties of perjury." [See Amendments, Art. VI.] 
And the said oaths or affirmations shall be taken and sub- 
scribed by the governor, lieutenant-governor, and councillors, 
before the president of the senate, in the presence of the two 
houses of assembly; and by the senators and representatives 
first elected under this constitution, before the president and 
five of the council of the former constitution; and forever after- 
wards before the governor and council for the time being: and 
by the residue of the officers aforesaid, before such persons and 
in such manner as from time to time shall be prescribed by the 
legislature. [See Amendments, Arts. VI and VII.] 

Art. II. No governor, lieutenant-governor, or judge of 
the supreme judicial court, shall hold any other office or place, 
under the authority of this Commonwealth, except such as by 
this constitution they are admitted to hold, saving that the 
judges of the vSaid court may hold the offices of justices of the 
peace through the state; nor shall they hold any other place or 
office, or receive any pension or salary from any other state or 
government or power whatever. [See Amendments. Art. 
VIII.] 

No person shall be capable of holding or exercising at the 
same time, within this state more than one of the following 
offices, viz. : judge of probate — sheriff — register of probate — 
or register of deeds: and never more than any two offices 
which are to be held by appointment of the governor, or the 
governor and council, or the senate, or the house of representa- 
tives, or by the election of the people of the state at large, or of 
the people of any county, military offices and the offices of 
justices of the peace excepted, shall be held by one person. 

No person holding the office of judge of the supreme judicial 
court — secretary — attorney-general — solicitor-general — 
treasurer or receiver general — judge of probate — commis- 
sary-general — [president, professor, or instructor of Harvard 
College — ] sheriff — clerk of the house of representatives — 
register of probate — register of deeds — clerk of the supreme 
judicial court — clerk of the inferior court of common pleas — 
or officer of the customs, including in this description naval 
officers — shall at the same time have a seat in the senate or 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 83 

house of representatives; but their being chosen or appointed 
to, and accepting the same, shall operate as a resignation of 
their seat in the senate or house of representatives; and the 
place so vacated shall be filled up. [See Amendments, Arts. 
VIII and XXVII.] 

And the same rule shall take place in case any judge of the 
said supreme judicial court, or judge of probate, shall accept a 
seat on council; or any councillor shall accept of either of those 
offices or places. 

And no person shall ever be admitted to hold a seat in the 
legislature, or any office of trust or importance under the gov- 
ernment of this Commonwealth, who shall, in the due course of 
law, have been convicted of bribery or corruption in obtaining 
an election or appointment. [See Amendments, Art. LXV.] 

Art. III. [In all cases where sums of money are mentioned 
in this constitution, the value thereof shall be computed in 
silver at six shillings and eight pence per ounce: and it shall 
be in the power of the legislature from time to time to in- 
crease such qualifications, as to property, of the persons to be 
elected to offices, as the circumstances of the Commonwealth 
shall require.] [See Amendments, Art. XIII and XXXIV.] 

Art. IV. All commissions shall be in the name of the Com- 
monwealth of Massachusetts, signed by the governor and 
attested by the secretary or his deputy, and have the great 
seal of the Commonwealth affixed thereto. 

Art. V. All writs, issuing out of the clerk's office in any of 
the courts of law, shall be in the name of the Commonwealth 
of MaSvSachusetts: they shall be under the seal of the court 
from whence they issue: they shall bear test of the first justice 
of the court to which they shall be returnable, who is not a 
party, and be signed by the clerk of such court. 

Art. VI. All the laws which have heretofore been adopted, 
used and approved in the Province, Colony or State of Massa- 
chusetts Bay, and usually practised on in the courts of law. 



84 Constitution of Massachusetts. 

shall otill remain and be in full force, until altered or repealed 
by the legislature; such parts only excepted as are repugnant 
to the rights and liberties contained in this constitution. 

Art. VII. The privilege and benefit of the writ of habeas 
corpus shall be enjoyed in this Commonwealth in the most free, 
easy, cheap, expeditious and ample manner; and shall not be 
suspended by the legislature, except upon the most urgent and 
pressing occasions, and for a limited time not exceeding twelve 
months. 

Art. VIII. The enacting style, in making and passing all 
acts, statutes and laws, shall be — "Be it enacted by the 
Senate and House of Representatives in General Court as- 
sembled, and by the authority of the same." 

Art. IX. [To the end there may be no failure of justice, or 
danger arise to the Commonwealth from a change of the form of 
government, all ofificers, civil and military, holding commis- 
sions under the government and people of Massachusetts Bay 
in New England, and all other officers of the said government 
and people, at the time this constitution shall take effect, shall 
have, hold, use, exercise and enjoy, all the powers and author- 
ity to them granted or committed, until other persons shall be 
appointed in their stead : and all courts of law shall proceed in 
the execution of the business of their respective departments; 
and all the executive and legislative officers, bodies and powers 
shall continue in full force, in the enjoyment and exercise of all 
their trusts, emplo3'ments and authority; until the general 
court and the supreme and executive officers under this con- 
stitution are designated and invested with their respective 
trusts, powers and authority.] 

Art. X. [In order the more effectually to adhere to the 
principles of the constitution, and to correct those violations 
which by any means may be made therein, as well as to form 
such alterations as from experience shall be found necessary, 
the general court which shall be in the year of our Lord one 
thousand seven hundred and ninetj''-five, shall issue precepts 
to the selectmen of the several towns, and to the assessors of 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 85 

the unincorporated plantations, directing them to convene the 
quaUfied voters of their respective towns and plantations, for 
the purpose of collecting their sentiments on the necessity or 
expediency of revising the constitution, in order to amend- 
ments. [See Amendments, Art. IX.] 

And if it shall appear by the returns made, that two-thirds 
of the qualified voters throughout the state, who shall assemble 
and vote in consequence of the said precepts, are in favor of 
such revision or amendment, the general court shall issue pre- 
cepts, or direct them, to be issued from the secretary's office to 
the several towns to elect delegates to meet in convention for 
the purpose aforesaid. 

The said delegates to be chosen in the same manner and pro- 
portion as their representatives in the second branch of the 
legislature are by this constitution to be chosen.] [Annulled 
by Amendments, Art. XLVIIL] 

Art. XI. This form of government shall be enrolled on 
parchment and deposited in the secretarj^'s office, and be a 
part of the laws of the land — and printed copies thereof shall 
be prefixed to the book containing the laws of this Common- 
wealth, in all future editions of the said laws. 



86 Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments. 



ARTICLES O? AMENDMENT. 

Article I. If anj^ bill or resolve shall be objected to, and 
not approved by the governor; and if the general court shall 
adjourn within five days after the same shall have been laid 
before the governor for his approbation, and thereby prevent 
his returning it with his objections, as provided by the consti- 
tution, such bill or resolve shall not become a law, nor have 
force as such. [See Const. Ch. I. § 1, Art. II.] 

Art. II. The general court shall have full power and au- 
thority to erect and constitute municipal or city governments, 
in any corporate town or towns in this commonwealth, and to 
grant to the inhabitants thereof such powers, privileges, and 
immunities, not repugnant to the constitution, as the general 
court shall deem necessary or expedient for the regulation and 
government thereof, and to prescribe the manner of calling 
aud holding public meetings of the inhabitants, in wards or 
otherwise, for the election of officers under the constitution, 
and the manner of returning the votes given at such meetings. 
Provided, that no such government shall be erected or con- 
stituted in any town not containing twelve thousand inhab- 
itants, nor unless it be with the consent, and on the applica- 
tion of a majority of the inhabitants of such town, present and 
voting thereon, pursuant to a vote at a meeting duly warned 
and holden for that purpose. And provided, also, that all by- 
laws, made by such municipal or city government, shall be 
subject, at all times, to be annulled by the general court. [See 
Amendments, Art. LXX.] 

Art. III. Every [male] citizen of twenty-one years of age 
and upwards, excepting paupers and persons under guardian- 
ship, who shall have resided within the commonwealth one 
year, and within the town or district in which he may claim 
a right to vote, six calendar months next preceding any elec- 



Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments. 87 

tion of governor, lieutenant-governor, senators or representa- 
tives, [and \vho shall have paid, by himself or his parent, mas- 
ter or guardian, any state or county tax, which shall, within 
two years next preceding such election, have been assessed 
upon him in any town or district of this commonwealth; and 
also, every citizen who shall be, by law, exempted from taxa- 
tion, and who shall be, in all other respects, qualiiied as above 
mentioned,] shall have a right to vote in such election of 
governor, lieutenant-governor, senators and representatives; 
and no other person shall be entitled to vote in such elections. 
[See Amendments, Arts. XX. XXIII, XXVI, XXVIII. XXX. 
XXXI. XXXII, XL, LXVIIJ and LXIX.] [For absent voting, 
see Amendments, Arts. XLV and LXXVL] 

Art. IV. Notaries public shall be appointed by the gov- 
ernor in the same manner as judicial officers are appointed, 
and shall hold their offices during seven j'ears, unless sooner 
removed by the governor, with the consent of the council, upon 
the address of both houses of the legislature. [See Amend- 
ments, Arts. XXXVII, LVII and LXIX, sect. 2.] 

[In case the office of secretary or treasurer of the common- 
wealth shall become vacant from any cause, during the recess 
of the general court, the governor, with the advice and consent 
of the council, shall nominate and appoint, under such regu- 
lations as may be prescribed by law, a competent and suitable 
person to such vacant office, who shall hold the same until a 
successor shall be appointed by the general court.] [This 
paragraph superseded by Amendments, Art. XVII.] 

[Whenever the exigencies of the commonwealth shall require 
the appointment of a commiSvSary-generai, he shall be nom- 
inated, appointed, and commissioned, in such manner as the 
legislature may, by law, prescribe. 

All officers commissioned to command in the militia may be 
removed from office in such manner as the legislature may, by 
law, prescribe.] [Last two paragraphs annulled and super- 
seded by Amendments, Art. LIIL] 

Art. V. [In the elections of captains and subalterns of the 
militia, all the members of their respective companies, as well 
those under as those above the age of twenty-one years, shall 



88 Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments. 

have a right to vote.] [Annulled by Amendments, Art. 
LIIL] 

Art. VI. Instead of the oath of allegiance prescribed by 
the constitution, the following oath shall be taken and sub- 
scribed by every person chosen or appointed to any office, civil 
or military, under the government of this commonwealth, be- 
fore he shall enter on the duties of his office, to wit: — 

"I, A. B., do solemnly swear, that I will bear true faith and 
allegiance to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and will 
support the constitution thereof. So help me, God." 

Provided, That when any person shall be of the denomina- 
tion called Quakers, and shall decline taking said oath, he shall 
make his affirmation in the foregoing form, omitting the word 
"swear" and inserting instead thereof the word "affirm;" and 
omitting the words "So help me, God," and subjoining, in- 
stead thereof, the words, "This I do under the pains and 
penalties of perjury," [See Const., Ch. VI, Art. I.] 

Art. VII. No oath, declaration, or subscription, excepting 
the oath prescribed in the preceding article, and the oath of 
office, shall be required of the governor, lieutenant-governor, 
councillors, senators, or representatives, to qualify them to 
perform the duties of their respective offices. 

Art. VIII. No judge of any court of this commonwealth, 
(except the court of sessions,) and no person holding any office 
under the authority of the United States, (postmasters ex- 
cepted,) shall, at the same time, hold the office of governor, 
lieutenant-governor, or councillor, or have a seat in the senate 
or house of representatives of this commonwealth; and no 
judge of any court in this commonwealth, (except the court 
of sessions,) nor the attorney-general, solicitor-general, county 
attorney, clerk of any court, sheriff, treasurer and receiver- 
general, register of probate, nor register of deeds, shall con- 
tinue to hold his said office after being elected a member of 
the Congress of the United States, and accepting that trust; 
but the acceptance of such trust, by any of the officers afore- 



Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments. 89 

said, shall be deemed and taken to be a resignation of his said 
office; and judges of the courts of common pleas shall hold no 
other office under the government of this commonwealth, the 
office of justice of the peace and militia oi&es excepted. [See 
Amendments, Art. LXV.] 

Art. IX. [If, at any time hereafter, any specific and par- 
ticular amendment or amendments to the constitution be pro- 
posed in the general court, and agreed to by a majority of the 
senators and two thirds of the members of the house of repre- 
sentatives present and voting thereon, such proposed amend- 
ment or amendments shall be entered on the journals of the 
two houses, with the yeas and nays taken thereon, and referred 
to the general court then next to be chosen, and shall be pub- 
lished; and if, in the general court next chosen as aforesaid, 
such proposed amendment or amendments shall be agreed to 
by a majority of the senators and two thirds of the members 
of the house of representatives present and voting thereon, 
then it shall be the duty of the general court to submit such 
proposed amendment or amendments to the people; and if 
they sjhall be approved and ratified by a majority of the quali- 
fied voters voting thereon, at meetings legally warned and 
holden for that purpose, they shall become part of the consti- 
tution of this commonwealth.] [Annulled by Amendments, 
Art. XLVIII, General Provisions, VIII.] 

Art. X. The political year shall begin on the first Wednes- 
day of January, instead of the last Wednesday of May; and 
the general court shall assemble every year on the said first 
Wednesday of January, and shall proceed, at that session, to 
make all the elections, and do all the other acts, which are by 
the constitution required to be made and done at the session 
which has heretofore commenced on the last Wednesday of 
May. And the general court shall be dissolved on the day 
next preceding the first Wednesday of January, without any 
proclamation or other act of the governor. But nothing herein 
contained shall prevent the general court from assembling at 
such other times as they shall judge necessary, or when called 



90 Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments. 

together by the governor. [The governor, heutenant-governor 
and councillors, shall also hold their respective offices for one 
year next following the first Wednesday of Januarj', and until 
others are chosen and qualified in their stead.] [See Amend- 
ments, Arts. LXIV, LXXII and LXXV.] 

[The meeting for the choice of governor, lieutenant-governor, 
senators, and representatives, shall be held on the second Mon- 
day of November in every year; but meetings may be ad- 
journed, if necessary, for the choice of representatives, to the 
next day, and again to the next succeeding day, but no further. 
But in case a second meeting shall be necessary for the choice 
of representatives, such meetings shall be held on the fourth 
Monday of the same month of November.] [See Amend- 
ments, Art. LXIV.] [This paragraph superseded by Amend- 
ments, Art. XV.] 

All the other provisions of the constitution, respecting the 
elections and proceedings of the members of the general court, 
or of any other officers or persons whatever, that have reference 
to the last Wednesday of May, as the commencement of the 
political 3^ear, shall be so far altered, as to have like reference 
to the first Wednesday of January. 

This article shall go into operation on the first day of Octo- 
ber, next following the day when the same shall be duly ratified 
and adopted as an amendment of the constitution [; and the 
governor, lieutenant-governor, councillors, senators, repre- 
sentatives, and all other state officers, who are annually chosen, 
and who shall be chosen for the current year, when the same 
shall go into operation, shall hold their respective offices until 
the first Wednesday of January then next following, and until 
others are chosen and quahfied in their stead, and no longer; 
and the first election of the governor, lieutenant-governor, 
senators, and representatives, to be had in virtue of this article, 
shall be had conformably thereunto, in the month of Novem- 
ber following the day on which the same shall be in force, and 
go into operation, pursuant to the foregoing provision]. 

All the provisions of the existing constitution, inconsistent 
with the provisions herein contained, are hereby wholly an- 
nulled. [.See Amendments, Art. LXIV.] 



Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments. 91 

Art. XI. Instead of the third article of the bill of rights, 
the following modification and amendment thereof is substi- 
tuted: — 

"As the public worship of God and instructions in piety, reli- 
gion, and morality, promote the happiness and prosperity of a 
people, and the security of a republican government; therefore, 
the several religious societies of this commonwealth, whether 
corporate or unincorporate, at any meeting legally warned and 
holden for that purpose, shall ever have the right to elect their 
pastors or religious teachers, to contract with them for their 
support, to raise money for erecting and repairing houses for 
public worship, for the maintenance of religious instruction, 
and for the payment of necessary expenses; and all persons 
belonging to any religious society shall be taken and held to be 
members, until they shall file with the clerk of such society a 
written notice, declaring the dissolution of their membership, 
and thenceforth shall not be liable for any grant or contract 
which may be thereafter made, or entered into by such society; 
and all religious sects and denominations, demeaning them- 
selves peaceably, and as good citizens of the commonwealth, 
shall be equally under the protection of the law; and no sub- 
ordination of any one sect or denomination to another shall 
ever be established by law." [vSee Amendments, Arts. XLVI 
and XLVIII, The Initiative, II, sect. 2, and The Referendum, 
III. sect. 2.] 

Art. XII. [In order to provide for a representation of the 
citizens of this commonwealth, founded upon the principles of 
equality, a census of the ratable polls, in each city, town and 
district of the commonwealth, on the first day of May, shall be 
taken and returned into the secretarj^'s office, in such manner 
as the legislature shall provide, within the month of May, in 
the 3'ear of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and thirty- 
seven, and in every tenth year thereafter, in the month of May, 
in manner aforesaid; and each town or city having three 
hundred ratable polls at the last preceding decennial census of 
polls, may elect one representative, and for every four hundred 
and fifty ratable polls in addition to the first three hundred, one 
representative more. 



92 Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments. 

Any town having less than three hundred ratable polls shall 
be represented thus: The whole number of ratable polls, at the 
last preceding decennial census of polls, shall be multiplied by 
ten, and the product divided by three hundred; and such town 
may elect one representative as many years within ten years, 
as three hundred is contained in the product aforesaid. 

Any city or town having ratable polls enough to elect one or 
more representatives, with any number of polls beyond the 
necessary number, may be represented, as to that surplus 
number, by multiplying such surplus number by ten and divid- 
ing the product by four hundred and fifty; and such city or 
town may elect one additional representative as manj' years, 
within the ten j^ears, as four hundred and fifty is contained in 
the product aforesaid. 

Any two or more of the several towns and districts may, by 
consent of a majority of the legal voters present at a legal meet- 
ing, in each of said towns and districts, respectively, called for 
that purpose, and held previous to the first day of July, in the 
year in which the decennial census of polls shall be taken, form 
themselves into a representative district to continue until the 
next decennial census of polls, for the election of a represent- 
ative, or representatives; and such district shall have all the 
rights, in regard to representation, which would belong to a 
town containing the same number of ratable polls. 

The governor and council shall ascertain and determine, 
within the months of July and August, in the year of our Lord 
one thousand eight hundred and thirty-seven, according to the 
foregoing i)rinciples, the number of representatives, which each 
citj', town and representative district is entitled to elect, and 
the number of years, within the period of ten years then next 
ensuing, that each city, town and representative district may 
elect an additional representative, and where any town has not 
a sufficient number of polls to elect a representative each year 
then how many years within the ten years, such town may 
elect a representative, and the same shall be done once in ten 
years thereafter by the governor and council, and the number 
of ratable polls in each decennial census of polls, shall deter- 
mine the number of representatives which each city, town and 
representative district may elect as aforesaid; and when the 



Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments. 93 

number of representatives to be elected by each city, town or 
representative district is ascertained and determined as afore- 
said, the governor shall cause the same to be published forth- 
with for the information of the people and that number shall 
remain fixed and unalterable for the period of ten years. 

All the provisions of the existing constitution inconsistent 
with the provisions herein contained, are hereby wholly an- 
nulled.] [Superseded by Amendments, Arts. XIII, XXI and 
LXXL] 

Art. XIII. [A census of the inhabitants of each city and 
town, on the first day of May, shall be taken, and returned into 
the secretary's office, on or before the last day of June, of the 
year one thousand eight hundred and forty, and of every 
tenth year thereafter; which census shall determine the ap- 
portionment of senators and representatives for the term of 
ten years. [See Amendments, Arts. XXI, XXII and LXXL] 

The several senatorial districts now existing shall be perma- 
nent. The senate shall consist of forty members; and in the 
year one thousand eight hundred and forty, and every tenth 
year thereafter the governor and council shall assign the num- 
ber of senators to be chosen in each district, according to the 
number of inhabitants in the same. But, in all cases, at least 
one senator shall be assigned to each district. [See Amend- 
ments, Arts. XXII and LXXL] 

The members of the house of representatives shall be appor- 
tioned in the following manner: Every town or city containing 
twelve hundred inhabitants may elect one representative; and 
two thousand four hundred inhabitants shall be the mean in- 
increasing number, which shall entitle it to an additional repre- 
sentative. [See Amendments, Arts. XXI and LXXL] 

Every town containing less than twelve hundred inhabitants 
shall be entitled to elect a representative as many times within 
ten years as the number one hundred and sixty is contained in 
the number of the inhabitants of said town. Such towns may 
also elect one representative for the year in which the valua- 
tion of estates within the commonwealth shall be settled. 

Any two or more of the several towns may, by consent of a 
majority of the legal voters present at a legal meeting, in each 



94 Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments, 

of said towns, respectively, called for that purpose, and held 
before the first day of August, in the year one thousand eight 
hundred and forty, and every tenth year thereafter, form them- 
selves into a representative district, to continue for the term of 
ten years; and such district shall have all the rights, in regard 
to representation, which would belong to a town containing the 
same number of inhabitants. 

The number of inhabitants which shall entitle a town to 
elect one representative, and the mean increasing number 
which shall entitle a town or city to elect more than one, and 
also the number by which the population of towns not entitled 
to a representative every year is to be divided, shall be in- 
creased, respectively, by one-tenth of the numbers above men- 
tioned, whenever the population of the commonwealth shall 
have increased to seven hundred and seventy thousand, and 
for every additional increase of seventy thousand inhabitants, 
the same addition of one-tenth shall be made, respectively, to 
the said numbers above mentioned. 

In the year of each decennial census, the governor and 
council shall, before the first day of September, apportion the 
number of representatives which each city, town, and repre- 
sentative district is entitled to elect, and ascertain how many 
years, within ten years, any town may elect a representative, 
which is not entitled to elect one every year; and the governor 
shall cause the same to be published forthwith. 

Nine councillors shall be annually chosen from among the 
people at large, on the first Wednesday of January, or as soon 
thereafter as may be, by the joint ballot of the senators and 
representatives, assembled in one room, who shall, as soon as 
may be, in like manner, fill up any vacancies that may happen 
in the council, by death, resignation, or otherwise. No person 
shall be elected a councillor, who has not been an inhabitant of 
this commonvvealth for the term of five years immediately pre- 
ceding his election; and not more than one councillor shall be 
chosen from any one senatorial district in the commonwealth.] 
[See Amendments, Arts. XVI, LXIV and LXXX.] 

No possession of a freehold, or of any other estate, shall be 
required as a qualification for holding a seat in either branch of 
the general court, or in the executive council. 



ConstiHition of Massachusetts — Amendments. 95 

Art. XIV. In all elections of civil officers by the people of 
this commonwealth, whose election is provided for by the con- 
stitution, the person having the highest number of votes shall 
be deemed and declared to be elected. 

Art. XV. The meeting for the choice of governor, lieuten- 
ant-governor, senators, and representatives, shall be held on 
the Tuesday next after the first Monday in November, an- 
nually; but in case of a failure to elect representatives on that 
day. a second meeting shall be holden, for that purpose, on the 
fourth Monday of the same month of November. [See Amend- 
ments, Art. LXIV and LXXX.] 

Art. XVI. Eight councillors shall be annually chosen by 
the inhabitants of this commonwealth, qualified to vote for 
governor. The election of councillors shall be determined by 
the same rule that is required in the election of governor. The 
legislature, at its first session after this amendment shall have 
been adopted, and at its first session after the next state census 
shall have been taken, and at its first session after each decen- 
nial state census thereafterwards, shall divide the common- 
wealth into eight districts of contiguous territory, each con- 
taining a number of inhabitants as nearh^ equal as practicable, 
without dividing any town or ward of a city, and each entitled 
to elect one councillor: provided, however, that if, at any time, 
the constitution shall provide for the division of the common- 
wealth into forty senatorial districts, then the legislature shall 
so arrange the councillor districts, that each district shall 
consist of five contiguous senatorial districts, as they shall be, 
from time to time, established by the legislature. No person 
shall be eligible to the office of councillor who has not been an 
inhabitant of the commonwealth for the term of five years 
immediately preceding his election. The day and manner of 
the election, the return of the votes, and the declaration of the 
said elections, shall be the same as are required in the election 
of governor. [Whenever there shall be a failure to elect the full 
number of councillors, the vacancies shall be filled in the same 
manner as is required for filling vacancies in the senate; and 
vacancies occasioned by death, removal from the state, or 



96 Constitution of Massachusetts — - Amendments. 

otherwise, shall be filled in like manner, as soon as may be, 
after such vacancies shall have happened.] And that there 
may be no delay in the organization of the government on the 
first Wednesday of January, the governor, vv^ith at least five 
councillors for the time being, shall, as soon as may be, exam- 
ine the returned copies of the records for the election of gov- 
ernor, lieutenant-governor, and councillors; and ten days be- 
fore the said first Wednesday in January he shall issue his sum- 
mons to such persons as appear to be chosen, to attend on that 
day to be qualified accordingly; and the secretary shall lay the 
returns before the senate and house of representatives on the 
said first Wednesday in January, to be by them examined ; and 
in case of the election of either of said officers, the choice shall 
be by them declared and published; but in case there shall be 
no election of either of said officers, the legislature shall proceed 
to fill such vacancies in the manner provided in the constitu- 
tion for the choice of such officers. [See Amendments, Arts. 
XXV, LXIV and LXXX.] 

Art. XVII. The secretary, treasurer and receiver-general, 
auditor, and attorney-general, shall be chosen [annually], on 
the day in November prescribed for the choice of governor; and 
each person then chosen as such, duly qualified in other re- 
spects, shall hold his office for the term of [one year] from the 
third Wednesday in January next thereafter, and until another 
is chosen and qualified in his stead. The qualification of the 
voters, the manner of the election, the return of the votes, and 
the declaration of the election, shall be such as are required in 
the election of governor. In case of a failure to elect either of 
said officers on the day in November aforesaid, or in case of the 
decease, in the meantime, of the person elected as such, such 
officer shall be chosen on or before the third Wednesday in 
January next thereafter, from the [two persons who had the 
highest number of votes for said offices on the day in Novem- 
ber aforesaid], by joint ballot of the senators and represent- 
atives, in one room; and in case the office of secretary, or 
treasurer and receiver-general, or auditor, or attorney-general, 
shall become vacant, from any cause, during an annual or 
special session of the general court, such vacancy shall in like 



ConstitiUion of Massachusetts — Amendments. 97 

manner be filled by choice from the people at large; but if such 
vacancy shall occur at any other time, it shall be supplied by 
the governor by appointment, with the advice and consent of 
the council. The person so chosen or appointed, duly qualified 
in other respects, shall hold his office until his successor is 
chosen and duly qualified in his stead. In case any person 
chosen or appointed to either of the offices aforesaid, shall neg- 
lect, for the space of ten days after he could otherwise enter 
upon his duties, to qualify himself in all respects to enter upon 
the discharge of such duties, the office to which he has been 
elected or appointed shall be deemed vacant. No person shall 
be eligible to either of said offices unless he shall have been an 
inhabitant of this commonwealth five years next preceding his 
election or appointment. [See Amendments, Arts. LXIV, 
LXXIX and LXXX.] 

Art. XVIII. [All moneys raised by taxation in the towns 
and cities for the support of public schools, and all moneys 
which may be appropriated by the state for the support of com- 
mon schools, shall be applied to, and expended in, no other 
schools than those which are conducted according to law, under 
the order and superintendence of the authorities of the town or 
city in which the money is to be expended; and such money 
shall never be appropriated to any religious sect for the main- 
tenance, exclusively, of its own school.] [Superseded by 
Amendments, Art, XLVL] 

Art. XIX. The legislature shall prescribe, by general law, 
for the election of sheriffs, registers of probate, [commissioners 
of insolvency,] and clerks of the courts, by the people of the sev- 
eral counties, and that district-attorneys shall be chosen by the 
people of the several districts, for such term of office as the leg- 
islature shall prescribe. [See Amendments, Art. XXXVI.] 

Art. XX. No person shall have the right to vote, or be 
eligible to office under the constitution of this commonwealth, 
who shall not be able to read the constitution in the English 
language, and write his name; provided, however, that the pro- 
visions of this amendment shall not apply to any person pre- 
vented by a physical disability from complying with its requi- 



98 Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments. 

sitions, nor to any person who now has the right to vote, nor 
to any persons who shall be sixty j^ears of age or upwards at 
the time this amendment shall take effect. [See Amendments, 
Arts. III. XXIII, XXVI. XXVIII. XXX, XXXI, XXXII, 
XL, XLV and LXXVL] 

Art. XXI. [A census of the legal voters of each city and 
town, on the first day of May, shall be taken and returned into 
the office of the secretary of the commonwealth, on or before 
the last day of June, in the year one thousand eight hundred 
and fifty-seven; and a census of the inhabitants of each city 
and town, in the year one thousand eight hundred and sixty- 
five, and of every tenth year thereafter. In the census afore- 
said, a special enumeration shall be made of the legal voters; 
and in each city, said enumeration shall specify the number of 
such legal voters aforesaid, residing in each ward of such city. 
The enumeration aforesaid shall determine the apportionment 
of representatives for the periods between the taking of the 
census. 

The house of representatives shall consist of two hundred and 
forty members, which shall be apportioned by the legislature, 
at its first session after the return of each enumeration as afore- 
said, to the several counties of the commonwealth, equally, as 
nearly as may be, according to their relative numbers of legal 
voters, as ascertained by the next preceding special enumera- 
tion; and the town of Cohasset, in the county of Norfolk, shall, 
for this purpose, as well as in the formation of districts, as 
hereinafter provided, be considered a part of the county of 
Plymouth; and it shall be the duty of the secretary of the com- 
monwealth, to certify, as soon as may be after it is determined 
by the legislature, the number of representatives to which each 
county shall be entitled, to the board authorized to divide each 
county into representative districts. The mayor and alder- 
men of the city of Boston, the county commissioners of other 
counties than Suffolk, — or in lieu of the mayor and aldermen 
of the city of Boston, or of the county commissioners in each 
county other than Suffolk, such board of special commissioners 
in each county, to be elected by the people of the county, or of 
the towns therein, as may for that purpose be provided b> law. 



Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments. 99 

— shall, on the first Tuesday of August next after each assign- 
ment of representatives to each county, assemble at a shire 
town of their respective counties, and proceed, as soon as may 
be, to divide the same into representative districts of contigu- 
ous territory, so as to apportion the representation assigned 
to each county equally, as nearly as may be, according to 
the relative number of legal voters in the several districts of 
each county; and such districts shall be so formed that no 
town or ward of a city shall be divided therefor, nor shall any 
district be made which shall be entitled to elect more than three 
representatives. Every representative, for one year at least 
next preceding his election, shall have been an inhabitant of 
the district for which he is chosen and shall cease to represent 
such district when he shall cease to be an inhabitant of the 
commonwealth. The districts in each county shall be num- 
bered by the board creating the same, and a description of each, 
with the numbers thereof and the number of legal voters 
therein, shall be returned by the board, to the secretary of the 
commonwealth, the county treasurer of each county, and to 
the clerk of every town in each district, to be filed and kept in 
their respective offices. The manner of calling and conducting 
the meetings for the choice of representatives, and of ascer- 
taining their election, shall be prescribed by law.] [Not less 
than one hundred members of the house of representatives 
shall constitute a quorum for doing business; but a less num- 
ber may organize temporarily, adjourn from day to day, and 
compel the attendance of absent members.] [Annulled and 
superseded by Amendments, Arts. XXXIII and LXXL] 

Art. XXII. [A census of the legal voters of each city and 
town, on the first day of May, shall be taken and returned into 
the office of the secretary of the commonwealth, on or before 
the last day of June, in the year one thousand eight hundred 
and fifty-seven; and a census of the inhabitants of each city 
and town, in the year one thousand eight hundred and sixty- 
five, and of every tenth year thereafter. In the census afore- 
said, a special enumeration shall be made of the legal voters, 
and in each city said enumeration shall specify the number of 
such legal voters aforesaid, residing in each ward of such city. 



100 Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments. 

The enumeration aforesaid shall determine the apportionment 
of senators for the periods between the taking of the census. 
The senate shall consist of forty members. The general court 
shall, at its first session after each next preceding special enu- 
meration, divide the commonwealth into forty districts of ad- 
jacent territory, each district to contain, as nearly as may be, 
an equal number of legal voters, according to the enumeration 
aforesaid: provided, however, that no town or ward of a city 
shall be divided therefor; and such districts shall be formed, 
as nearly as may be, without uniting two counties, or parts of 
two or more counties, into one district. Each district shall 
elect one senator, who shall have been an inhabitant of this 
commonwealth five years at least immediately preceding his 
election, and at the time of his election shall be an inhabitant 
of the district for which he is chosen; and he shall cease to rep- 
resent such senatorial district when he shall cease to be an 
inhabitant of the commonwealth.] [Not less than sixteen sen- 
ators shall constitute a quorum for doing business; but a less 
number may organize temporarily, adjourn from day to day, 
and compel the attendance of absent members.] [See Amend- 
ments, Art. XXIV.] [Annulled and superseded by Amend- 
ments. Arts. XXXIII and LXXL] 

Art. XXIII. [No person of foreign birth shall be entitled to 
vote, or shall be eligible to office, unless he shall have resided 
within the jurisdiction of the United States for two years sub- 
sequent to his naturalization, and shall be otherwise qualified, 
according to the constitution and laws of this commonwealth: 
provided, that this amendment shall not affect the rights which 
any person of foreign birth possessed at the time of the adop- 
tion thereof; and, provided, further, that it shall not affect the 
rights of any child of a citizen of the United States, born during 
the temporary absence of the parent therefrom.] [Annulled 
by Amendments, Art. XXVI.] 

Art. XXIV. Any vacancy in the senate shall be filled by 
election by the people of the unrepresented district, upon the 
order of a majority of the senators elected. 



Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments. 101 

Art. XXV. In case of a vacancy in the council, from a fail- 
ure of election, or other cause, the senate and house of repre- 
sentatives shall, by concurrent vote, choose some eligible per- 
son from the people of the district wherein such vacancy occurs, 
to fill that offtce. If such vacancy shall happen when the leg- 
islature is not in session, the governor, with the advice and 
consent of the council, may fill the same by appointment of 
some eligible person. 

Art. XXVI. The twenty-third article of the articles of 
amendment of the constitution of this commonwealth, which, 
is as follows, to wit: "No person of foreign birth shall be en- 
titled to vote, or shall be eligible to office, unless he shall have 
resided within the jurisdiction of the United States for two 
years subsequent to his naturalization, and shall be otherwise 
qualified, according to the constitution and laws of this com- 
monwealth: provided, that this amendment shall not affect 
the rights which any person of foreign birth possessed at the 
time of the adoption thereof; and provided, further, that it shall 
not affect the rights of any child of a citizen of the United 
States, born during the temporary absence of the parent there- 
from," is hereby wholly annulled. 

Art. XXVII. So much of article two of chapter six of the 
constitution of this commonwealth as relates to persons hold- 
ing the office of president, professor, or instructor of Harvard 
College, is hereby annulled. 

Art. XXVIII. No person having served in the army or 
navy of the United States in time of war, and having been 
honorably discharged from such service, if otherwise qualified 
to vote, shall be disqualified therefor on account of [being a 
pauper;] or [, if a pauper,] because of the non-payment of a 
poll tax. [Amended by Amendments, Art. XXXI.] 

Art. XXIX. The General Court shall have full power and 
authority to provide for the inhabitants of the towns in this 
Commonwealth more than one place of public meeting within 
the limits of each town for the election of officers under the 



102 Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments. 

constitution, and to prescribe the manner of calling, holding 
and conducting such meetings. All the provisions of the exist- 
ing constitution inconsistent with the provisions herein con- 
tained are hereby annulled. [For absent voting, see Amend- 
ments, Arts. XLV and LXXVI.] 

Art. XXX. No person, otherwise qualified to vote in elec- 
tions for governor, lieutenant-governor, senators, and repre- 
sentatives, shall, by reason of a change of residence within the 
Commonwealth, be disqualified from voting for said officers in 
the city or town from which he has removed his residence, 
until the expiration of six calendar months from the time of 
such removal. [For absent and compulsory voting, see 
Amendments, Arts. XLV, LXI and LXXVI.] 

Art. XXXI. Article twenty-eight of the Amendments of 
the Constitution is hereby amended by striking out in the 
fourth line thereof the words "being a pauper", and inserting 
in place thereof the words: — receiving or having received aid 
from any city or town, — and also by striking out in said 
fourth line the words "if a pauper", so that the article as 
amended shall read as follows: ARTICLE XXVIII. No per- 
son having served in the army or navy of the United States in 
time of war, and having been honorably discharged from such 
service, if otherwise qualified to vote, shall be disqualified 
therefor on account of receiving or having received aid from 
any city or town, or because of the non-payment of a poll tax. 

Art. XXXII. So much of article three of the Amendments 
of the Constitution of the Commonwealth as is contained in 
the following words: "and who shall have paid, by himself, or 
his parent, master, or guardian, any state or county tax, which 
shall, within two years next preceding such election, have been 
assessed upon him, in any town or district of this Common- 
wealth ; and also every citizen who shall be, by law, exempted 
from taxation, and who shall be, in all other respects, qualified 
as above mentioned", is hereby annulled. 

Art. XXXIII. A majority of the members of each branch 
of the General Court shall constitute a quorum for the transac- 



Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments. 103 

tion of business, but a less number may adjourn from day to 
day, and compel the attendance of absent members. All the 
provisions of the existing Constitution inconsistent with the 
provisions herein contained are hereby annulled. 

Art. XXXIV. So much of article two of section one of 
chapter two of part the second of the Constitution of the Com- 
monwealth as is contained in the following words: "and unless 
he shall at the same time be seised, in his own right, of a free- 
hold, within the Commonwealth, of the value of one thousand 
pounds"; is hereby annulled. 

Art. XXXV. So much of article two of section three of 
chapter one of the Constitution of the Commonwealth as is 
contained in the following words: "The expenses of travelling 
to the general assembly, and returning home, once in every 
session, and no more, shall be paid by the government, out of 
the public treasury, to every member who shall attend as 
seasonably as he can, in the judgment of the house, and does 
not depart without leave", is hereby annulled. 

Art. XXXVI. So much of article nineteen of the articles of 
Amendment to the Constitution of the Commonwealth as is 
contained in the following words: "commissioners of insol- 
vency", is hereby annulled. 

Art. XXXVII. The governor, with the consent of the 
council, may remove justices of the peace and notaries public. 

Art. XXXVIII. Voting machines or other mechanical 
devices for voting may be used at all elections under such regu- 
lations as may be prescribed by law: provided, however, that 
the right of secret voting shall be preserved. 

Art. XXXIX. Article ten of part one of the Constitution 
is hereby amended by adding to it the following words: — The 
legislature may by special acts for the purpose of laying out, 
widening or relocating highways or streets, authorize the tak- 
ing in fee by the Commonwealth, or by a county, city or town. 



104 Constitution of Massachiisett's — Amendments. 

of more land and property than are needed for the actual con- 
struction of such highway or street: provided, however, that the 
land and property authorized to be taken are specified in the 
act and are no more in extent than would be sufficient for suit- 
able building lots on both sides of such highway or street, and 
after so much of the land or property has been appropriated 
for such highway or street as is needed therefor, may authorize 
the sale of the remainder for value with or without suitable 
restrictions. 

Art. XL. Article three of the Amendments to the Consti- 
tution is hereby amended by inserting after the word "guard- 
ianship", in line two, the following: — and persons temporarily 
or permanently disqualified by law because of corrupt prac- 
tices in respect to elections. 

Art. XLI. Full power and authority are hereby given and 
granted to the general court to prescribe for wild or forest lands 
such methods of taxation as will develop and conserve the 
forest resources of the commonwealth. 

Art. XLII. [Full power and authority are hereby given 
and granted to the general court to refer to the people for their 
rejection or approval at the polls any act or resolve of the gen- 
eral court or any part or parts thereof. Such reference shall be 
by a majority yea and nay vote of all members of each house 
present and voting. Any act, resolve, or part thereof so re- 
ferred shall be voted on at the regular state election next en- 
suing after such reference, shall become law if approved by a 
majority of the voters voting thereon, and shall take effect at 
the expiration of thirty days after the election at which it was 
approved or at such time after the expiration of the said thirty 
days as may be fixed in such act, resolve or part thereof.] 
[Annulled and superseded by Amendments, Art. XLVIII, 
General Provisions, VIII.] 

Art. XLIII. The general court shall have power to au- 
thorize the commonwealth to take land and to hold, improve, 
sub-divide, build upon and sell the same, for the purpose of 
relieving congestion of population and providing homes for 



Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments. 105 

citizens: provided, however, that this amendment shall not be 
deemed to authorize the sale of such land or buildings at less 
than the cost thereof. 

Art. XLIV. Full power and authority are hereby given 
and granted to the general court to impose and levy a tax on 
income in the manner hereinafter provided. Such tax may be 
at different rates upon income derived from different classes of 
property, but shall be levied at a uniform rate throughout the 
commonwealth upon incomes derived from the same class of 
property. The general court may tax income not derived from 
property at a lower rate than income derived from property, 
and ma^"^ grant reasonable exemptions and abatements. Any 
class of property the income from which is taxed under the 
provisions of this article may be exempted from the imposition 
and levying of proportional and reasonable assessments, rates 
and taxes as at present authorized by the constitution. This 
article shall not be construed to limit the power of the general 
court to impose and levy reasonable duties and excises. 

Art. XLV. [The general court shall have power to provide 
by law for voting by qualified voters of the commonwealth 
who, at the time of an election, are absent from the city or 
town of which they are inhabitants in the choice of any officer 
to be elected or upon anj- question submitted at such election.] 
[Annulled and superseded by Amendments, Art. LXXVI.] 
[For compulsory voting, see Amendments, Art. LXL] 

Art. XLVI. (In place of article XVIII of the articles of 
amendment of the constitution ratified and adopted April 9, 
1821. the following article of amendment, submitted by the 
constitutional convention, was ratified and adopted November 
6, 1917.) Article XVIII. Section 1. No law shall be passed 
prohibiting the free exercise of religion. 

Section 2. All moneys raised by taxation in the towns and 
cities for the support of public schools, and all moneys which 
may be appropriated by the commonwealth for the support of 
common schools shall be applied to, and expended in, no other 
schools than those which are conducted according to law, 
under the order and superintendence of the authorities of the 



106 Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments. 

town or city in which the money is expended ; and no grant, 
appropriation or use of pubHc money or property or loan of 
public credit shall be made or authorized by the commonwealth 
or any political division thereof for the purpose of founding, 
maintaining or aiding any school or institution of learning, 
whether under public control or otherwise, wherein any de- 
nominational doctrine is inculcated, or any other school, or any 
college, infirmary, hospital, institution, or educational, chari- 
table or religious undertaking which is not publicly owned and 
under the exclusive control, order and superintendence of 
public officers or public agents authorized bj'^ the common- 
wealth or federal authoritj' or both, except that appropriations 
may be made for the maintenance and support of the Soldiers' 
Home in Massachusetts and for free public libraries in any 
city or town, and to carry out legal obligations, if any, already 
entered into; and no such grant, appropriation or use of public 
money or property or loan of public credit shall be made or 
authorized for the purpose of founding, maintaining or aiding 
any church, religious denomination or societj'. 

Section 3. Nothing herein contained shall be construed to 
prevent the commonwealth, or any political division thereof, 
from paying to privately controlled hospitals, infirmaries, or 
institutions for the deaf, dumb or blind not more than the 
ordinary and reasonable compensation for care or support 
actually rendered or furnished by such hospitals, infirmaries 
or institutions to such persons as may be in whole or in part 
unable to support or care for themselves. 

Section 4. Nothing herein contained shall be construed to 
deprive any inmate of a publicly controlled reformatory, penal 
or charitable institution of the opportunity of religious exer- 
cises therein of his own faith; but no inmate of such institution 
shall be compelled to attend religious services or receive re- 
ligious instruction against his will, or, if a minor, without the 
consent of his parent or guardian. 

Section 5. This amendment shall not take effect until the 
October first next succeeding its ratification and adoption by 
the people. [See Amendments, Arts. XLVIII, The Initiative, 
II, sect. 2, and LXII.] ' 



Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments. 107 

Art. XLVII. The maintenance and distribution at reason- 
able rates, during time of war, public exigency, emergency 
or distress, of a sufficient supply of food and other common 
necessaries of life and the providing of shelter, are public 
functions, and the commonwealth and the cities and towns 
therein may take and may provide the same for their inhabit- 
ants in such manner as the general court shall determine. 

Art. XLVIII. 
/. Definition. 

Legislative power shall continue to be vested in the general 
court; but the people reserve to themselves the popular 
initiative, which is the power of a specified number of voters 
to submit constitutional amendments and laws to the people 
for approval or rejection; and the popular referendum, which 
is the power of a specified number of voters to submit laws, 
enacted by the general court, to the people for their ratification 
or rejection. 

The Initiative. 
II. Initiative Petitions. 

Section 1. Contents. — An initiative petition shall set 
forth the full text of the constitutional amendment or law, 
hereinafter designated as the measure, which is proposed by 
the petition. 

Section 2. Excluded Matters. — No measure that relates 
to religion, religious practices or religious institutions; or to 
the appointment, qualification, tenure, removal, recall or com- 
pensation of judges; or to the reversal of a judicial decision; 
or to the powers, creation or abolition of courts; or the opera- 
tion of which is restricted to a particular town, city or other 
political division or to particular districts or localities of the 
commonwealth; or that makes a specific appropriation of 
money from the treasury of the commonwealth, shall be pro- 
posed bj' an initiative petition; but if a law approved by the 
people is not repealed, the general court shall raise by taxation 
or otherwise and shall appropriate such money as may be 
necessary to carry such law into effect. 



108 Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments. 

Neither the eighteenth amendment of the constitution, as 
approved and ratified to take effect on the first day of Octobei 
in the year nineteen hundred and eighteen, nor this provision 
for its protection, shall be the subject of an initiative amend- 
ment. 

No proposition inconsistent with any one of the following 
rights of the individual, as at present declared in the declara- 
tion of rights, shall be the subject of an initiative or referendum 
petition: The right to receive compensation for private prop- 
erty appropriated to public use; the right of access to and 
protection in courts of justice; the right of trial by jury; pro- 
tection from unreasonable search, unreasonable bail and the 
law martial; freedom of the press; freedom of speech; free- 
dom of elections; and the right of peaceable assembly. 

No part of the constitution specifically excluding any matter 
from the operation of the popular initiative and referendum 
shall be the subject of an initiative petition; nor shall this 
section be the subject of such a petition. 

The limitations on the legislative power of the general court 
in the constitution shall extend to the legislative power of the 
people as exercised hereunder. 

[Section 3. Mode of Originating. — Such petition shall 
first be signed by ten qualified voters of the commonwealth 
and shall then be submitted to the attorney-general, and if he 
shall certify that the measure is in proper form for submission 
to the people, and that it is not, either affirmatively or nega- 
tively, substantially the same as any measure which has been 
qualified for submission or submitted to the people within 
three years of the succeeding first Wednesday in December 
and that it contains only subjects not excluded from the 
popular initiative and which are related or which are mutually 
dependent, it may then be filed with the secretary of the com- 
monwealth. The secretary of the commonwealth shall provide 
blanks for the use of subsequent signers, and shall print at the 
top of each blank a description of the proposed measure as such 
description will appear on the ballot together with the names 
and residences of the first ten signers. All initiative petitions, 
with the first ten signatures attached, shall be filed with the 
secretary of the commonwealth not earlier than the first 



Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments. 109 

Wednesday of the September before the assembhng of the 
general court into which they are to be introduced, and the 
remainder of the required signatures shall be filed not later 
than the first Wednesday of the following December.] [Sec- 
tion 3 superseded by section 1 of Amendments, Art. LXXIV.] 
Section 4. Transmission to the General Court. — If an 
initiative petition, signed by the required number of qualified 
voters, has been filed as aforesaid, the secretary of the com- 
monwealth shall, upon the assembling of the general court, 
transmit it to the clerk of the house of representatives, and the 
proposed measure shall then be deemed to be introduced and 
pendmg. 

III. Legislative Action. General Provisions. 

Section 1. Reference to Committee. — If a measure is in- 
troduced into the general court by initiative petition, it shall 
be referred to a committee thereof, and the petitioners and 
all parties in interest shall be heard, and the measure shall be 
considered and reported upon to the general court with the 
committee's recommendations, and the reasons therefor, in 
writing. Majority and minority reports shall be signed by the 
members of said committee. 

Section 2. Legislative Stcbstitutes. — The general court 
may, by resolution passed by yea and nay vote, either by the 
two houses separately, or in the case of a constitutional amend- 
ment by a majority of those voting thereon in joint session in 
each of two years as hereinafter provided, submit to the people 
a substitute for any measure introduced by initiative petition, 
such substitute to be designated on the ballot as the legislative 
substitute for such an initiative measure and to be grouped 
with it as an alternative therefor, 

IV. Legislative Action on Proposed Constitutional Amend- 
ments. 

[Section 1. Definition. — A proposal for amendment to 
the constitution introduced into the general court by initiative 
petition shall be designated an initiative amendment, and an 
amendment introduced by a member of either house shall be 
designated a legislative substitute or a legislative amendment. 

Section 2. Joint Session. — If a proposal for a specific 



110 Constitution of Alassachiisetts — Amendments. 

amendment of the constitution is introduced into the general 
court by initiative petition signed by not less than twenty-five 
thousand qualified voters, or if in case of a proposal for amend- 
ment introduced into the general court by a member of either 
house, consideration thereof in joint session is called for by 
vote of either house, such proposal shall, not later than the 
second Wednesday in June, be laid before a joint session of 
the two houses, at which the president of the senate shall 
preside; and if the two houses fail to agree upon a time for 
holding any joint session hereby required, or fail to continue 
the same from time to time until final action has been taken 
upon all amendments pending, the governor shall call such 
joint session or continuance thereof.] [Section 2 superseded 
by section 1 of Amendments, Art. LXXXL] 

Section 3. Amendment of Proposed Amendments. — A 
proposal for an amendment to the constitution introduced 
by initiative petition shall be voted upon in the form in which 
it was introduced, unless such amendment is amended by vote 
of three-fourths of the members voting thereon in joint session, 
which vote shall be taken by call of the yeas and nays if called 
for b}'- any member. 

Section 4. Legislative Action. — Final legislative action in 
the joint session upon any amendment shall be taken only 
by call of the yeas and nays, which shall be entered upon the 
journals of the two houses; and an unfavorable vote at any 
stage preceding final action shall be verified by call of the yeas 
and naj's, to be entered in like manner. At such joint session 
a legislative amendment receiving the affirmative votes of a 
majority of all the members elected, or an initiative amend- 
ment receiving the affirmative votes of not less than one-fourth 
of all the members elected, shall be referred to the next general 
court. 

Section 5, Submission to the People. — If in the next 
general court a legislative amendment shall again be agreed 
to in joint session by a majority of all the members elected, or 
if an initiative amendment or a legislative substitute shall 
again receive the affirmative votes of at least one-fourth of all 
the members elected, such fact shall be certified by the clerk 
of such joint session to the secretary of the commonwealth, 



Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments. Ill 

who shall submit the amendment to the people at the next 
state election. Such amendment shall become part of the con- 
stitution if approved, in the case of a legislative amendment, 
by a majority of the voters voting thereon, or if approved, in 
the case of an initiative amendment or a legislative substitute, 
by voters equal in number to at least thirty per cent of the 
total number of ballots cast at such state election and also by 
a majority of the voters voting on such amendment. 

V. Legislative Action on Proposed Laws. 

[Section 1. Legislative Procedure. — If an initiative peti- 
tion for a law is introduced into the general court, signed by 
not less than twenty thousand qualified voters, a vote shall be 
taken by yeas and nays in both houses before the first Wednes- 
day of June upon the enactment of such law in the form in 
which it stands in such petition. If the general court fails to 
enact such law before the first Wednesday of June, and if such 
petition is completed by filing with the secretary of the com- 
monwealth, not earlier than the first Wednesday of the follow- 
ing July nor later than the first Wednesday of the following 
August, not less than five thousand signatures of qualified 
voters, in addition to those signing such initiative petition, 
which signatures must have been obtained after the first 
Wednesday of June aforesaid, then the secretary of the com- 
monwealth shall submit such proposed law to the people at 
the next state election. If it shall be approved by voters 
equal in number to at least thirty per cent of the total number 
of ballots cast at such state election and also by a majority of 
the voters voting on such law, it shall become law. and shall 
take efi"ect in thirty days after such state election or at such 
time after such election as may be provided in such law.] 
[Section 1 superseded by section 2 of Amendments, Art. 
LXXXL] 

[Section 2. Amendment by Petitioners. — If the general 
court fails to pass a proposed law before the first Wednesday 
of June, a majority of the first ten signers of the initiative 
petition therefor shall have the right, subject to certification 
by the attorney-general filed as hereinafter provided, to amend 
the measure which is the subject of such petition. An amend- 



112 Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments. 

ment so made shall not invalidate any signature attached to 
the petition. If the measure so amended, signed by a majority 
of the first ten signers, is filed with the secretary of the com- 
monwealth before the first Wednesday of the following July, 
together with a certificate signed by the attorney-general to 
the effect that the amendment made by such proposers is in 
his opinion perfecting in its nature and does not materially 
change the substance of the measure, and if such petition is 
completed by filing with the secretary of the commonwealth, 
not earlier than the first Wednesday of the following July nor 
later than the first Wednesday of the following August, not 
less than five thousand signatures of qualified voters, in addi- 
tion to those signing such initiative petition, which signatures 
must have been obtained after the first Wednesdaj' of June 
aforesaid, then the secretary of the commonwealth shall sub- 
mit the measure to the people in its amended form.] [Section 2 
superseded by section 3 of Amendments, Art. LXXXI.] 

VI. Conflicting and Alternative Measures. 

If in any judicial proceeding, provisions of constitutional 
amendments or of laws approved by the people at the same 
election are held to be in conflict, then the provisions con- 
tained in the measure that received the largest number of 
affirmative votes at such election shall govern. 

A constitutional amendment approved at any election shall 
govern any law approved at the same election. 

The general court, by resolution passed as hereinbefore set 
forth, may provide for grouping and designating upon the 
ballot as conflicting measures or as alternative measures, 
only one of which is to be adopted, any two or more proposed 
constitutional amendments or laws which have been or may 
be passed or qualified for submission to the people at any one 
election: provided, that a proposed constitutional amend- 
ment and a proposed law shall not be so grouped, and that 
the ballot shall afford an opportunity to the voter to vote for 
each of the measures or for only one of the measures, as may 
be provided in said resolution, or against each of the measures 
so grouped as conflicting or as alternative. In case more than 
one of the measures so grouped shall receive the vote required 



Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments. 113 

for its approval as herein provided, only that one for which 
the largest affirmative vote was cast shall be deemed to be 
approved. 

The Referendum. 

I. When Statutes shall take Effect. 

No law passed by the general court shall take effect earlier 

than ninety days after it has become a law, excepting laws 

declared to be emergency laws and laws which may not be made 

the subject of a referendum petition, as herein provided. 

II. Emergency Measures. 
A law declared to be an emergency law shall contain a 
preamble setting forth the facts constituting the emergency, 
and shall contain the statement that such law is necessary for 
the immediate preservation of the public peace, health, safety 
or convenience. [A separate vote shall be taken on the pre- 
amble by call of the yeas and nays, which shall be recorded, 
and unless the preamble is adopted by two-thirds of the mem- 
bers of each house voting thereon, the law shall not be an 
emergency law; but] if the governor, at any time before the 
election at which it is to be submitted to the people on refer- 
endum, flies with the secretary of the commonwealth a state- 
ment declaring that in his opinion the immediate preservation 
of the public peace, health, safety or convenience requires 
that such law should take effect forthwith and that it is an 
emergency law and setting forth the facts constituting the 
emergency, then such law, if not previously suspended as here- 
inafter provided, shall take effect without suspension, or if such 
law has been so suspended such suspension shall thereupon 
terminate and such law shall thereupon take effect: but no 
grant of any franchise or amendment thereof, or renewal or 
extension thereof for more than one year shall be declared to 
be an emergency law. [See Amendments, Art. LXVII.] 

///. Referendum Petitions. 
Section 1. Contents. — A referendum petition may ask for 
a referendum to the people upon any law enacted by the gen- 
eral court which is not herein expressly excluded. 



114 Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments. 

Section 2. Excluded Matters. — No law that relates to re- 
ligion, religious practices or religious institutions; or to the 
appointment, qualification, tenure, removal or compensation 
of judges; or to the powers, creation or abolition of courts; 
or the operation of which ip restricted to a particular town, 
city or other political division or to particular districts or 
localities of the commonwealth; or that appropriates money 
for the current or ordinary expenses of the commonwealth 
or for any of its departments, boards, commissions or institu- 
tions shall be the subject of a referendum petition. 

Section 3. Mode of Petitioning for the Suspension of a 
Law and a Referendum thereon. — A petition asking for a 
referendum on a law, and requesting that the operation of such 
law be suspended, shall first be signed by ten qualified voters 
and shall then be filed with the secretary of the common- 
wealth not later than thirty days after the law that is the 
subject of the petition has become law. [The secretary of the 
common\vealth shall provide blanks for the use of subsequent 
signers, and shall print at the top of each blank a description 
of the proposed law as such description will appear on the 
ballot together with the names and residences of the first ten 
signers. If such petition is completed by filing with the secre- 
tary of the commonwealth not later than ninety days after the 
law which is the subject of the petition has become law the 
signatures of not less than fifteen thousand qualified voters of 
the commonwealth, then the operation of such law shall be 
suspended, and the secretary of the commonwealth shall sub- 
mit such law to the people at the next state election, if 
thirty days intervene between the date when such petition 
is filed with the secretary of the commonwealth and the date 
for holding such state election; if thirty days do not so inter- 
vene, then such law shall be submitted to the people at the 
next following state election, unless in the meantime it shall 
have been repealed; and if it shall be approved by a majority 
of the qualified voters voting thereon, such law shall, subject 
to the provisions of the constitution, take effect in thirty days 
after such election, or at such time after such election as may 
be provided in such law; if not so approved such law shall 
be null and void; but no such law shall be held to be disap- 



Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments. 115 

proved if the negative vote is less than thirty per cent of the 
total number of ballots cast at such state election.] [Section 3 
amended by section 2 of Amendments, Art. LXXIV and sec- 
tion 4 of Amendments, Art. LXXXI.] 

Section 4. Petitions for Referendum on an Emergency 
Law or a Law the Suspension of which is not asked for. — A 
referendum petition may ask for the repeal of an emergency 
law or of a law which takes effect because the referendum 
petition does not contain a request for suspension, as aforesaid. 
Such petition shall first be signed by ten qualified voters of 
the commonwealth, and shall then be filed with the secretary 
of the commonwealth not later than thirty days after the 
law which is the subject of the petition has become law. [The 
secretary of the commonwealth shall provide blanks for the 
use of subsequent signers, and shall print at the top of each 
blank a description of the proposed law as such description 
will appear on the ballot together with the names and resi- 
dences of the first ten signers. If such petition filed as afore- 
said is completed by filing with the secretary of the common- 
wealth not later than ninety days after the law which is the 
subject of the petition has become law the signatures of not 
less than ten thousand qualified voters of the commonwealth 
protesting against such law and asking for a referendum 
thereon, then the secretary of the commonwealth shall submit 
such law to the people at the next state election, if thirty days 
intervene between the date when such petition is filed with the 
secretary of the commonwealth and the date for holding such 
state election. If thirty days do not so intervene, then it shall 
be submitted to the people at the next following state election, 
unless in the meantime it shall have been repealed; and if it 
shall not be approved by a majority of the qualified voters 
voting thereon, it shall, at the expiration of thirty days after 
such election, be therebj^ repealed; but no such law shall be 
held to be disapproved if the negative vote is less than thirty 
per cent of the total number of ballots cast at such state elec- 
tion.] [Section 4 superseded by section 3 of Amendments, 
Art. LXXIV and section 5 of Amendments, Art. LXXXI.] 



116 Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments. 

General Provisions. 
I. Identification and Certification of Signatures. 
Provision shall be made by law for the proper identification 
and certification of signatures to the petitions hereinbefore 
referred to, and for penalties for signing any such petition, or 
refusing to sign it, for money or other valuable consideration^ 
and for the forgery of signatures thereto. Pending the passage 
of such legislation all provisions of law relating to the identifica- 
tion and certification of signatures to petitions for the nomina- 
tion of candidates for state offices or to penalties for the forgery 
of such signatures shall apply to the signatures to the petitions 
herein referred to. The general court may provide by law that 
no co-partnership or corporation shall undertake for hire or 
reward to circulate petitions, ma}^ require individuals who 
circulate petitions for hire or reward to be licensed, and may 
make other reasonable regulations to prevent abuses arising 
from the circulation of petitions for hire or reward. 

II. Limitation on Signatures. 
Not more than one-fourth of the certified signatures on any 
petition shall be those of registered voters of any one county. 

[///. Form of Ballot. 

Each proposed amendment to the constitution, and each 
law submitted to the people, shall be described on the ballots 
by a description to be determined by the attorney-general 
subject to such provision as may be made by law, and the 
secretary of the commonwealth shall give each question a num- 
ber and cause such question, except as otherwise authorized 
herein, to be printed on the ballot in the following form: — 

In the case of an amendment to the constitution: Shall an 
amendment to the constitution (here insert 
description, and state, in distinctive type, 
whether approved or disapproved by the gen- 
eral court, and by what vote thereon) be approved? 

In the case of a law: Shall a law (here insert 
description, and state, in distinctive type, 
whether approved or disapproved by the gen- 
eral court, and by what vote thereon) be approved? 



YKS. 




NO. 





YKS. 




NO. 





Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments. 117 



IV. Information for Voters. 

The secretary of the commonwealth shall cause to be printed 
and sent to each registered voter in the commonwealth the full 
text of every measure to be submitted to the people, together 
with a copy of the legislative committee's majority and minor- 
ity reports, if there be such, with the names of the majority 
and minority members thereon, a statement of the votes of 
the general court on the measure, and a description of the 
measure as such description will appear on the ballot; and 
shall, in such manner as may be provided by law, cause to be 
prepared and sent to the voters other information and argu- 
ments for and against the measure.] [Subheadings III and IV 
superseded by section 4 of Amendments, Art. LXXIV.] 

V. The Veto Power of the Governor. 

The veto power of the governor shall not extend to measures 
approved by the people. 

VI. The General Coicrt's Power of Repeal. 

Subject to the veto power of the governor and to the right 
of referendum by petition as herein provided, the general 
court may amend or repeal a law approved by the people. 

VII. Amendment declared to be Self-executing. 

This article of amendment to the constitution is self-execut- 
ing, but legislation not inconsistent with anything herem 
contained may be enacted to facilitate the operation of its 
provisions. 

VIII. Articles IX and XLII of Amendments of the Consti- 
tution annulled. 

Article IX and Article XLII of the amendments of the con- 
stitution are hereby annulled. 

Art. XLIX. The conservation, development and utiliza- 
tion of the agricultural, mineral, forest, water and other natural 
resources of the commonwealth are public uses, and the gen- 
eral court shall have power to provide for the taking, upon 



118 Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments. 

payment of just compensation therefor, of lands and ease- 
ments or interests therein, inchiding water and mineral rights, 
for the purpose of securing and promoting the proper conserva- 
tion, development, utilization and control thereof and to enact 
legislation necessary or expedient therefor. 

Art. L. Advertising on public ways, in public places and 
on private property within public view may be regulated and 
restricted by law. 

Art. LI. The preservation and maintenance of ancient 
landmarks and other property of historical or antiquarian 
interest is a public use, and the commonwealth and the cities 
and towns therein may, upon payment of just compensation, 
take such property or any interest therein under such regu- 
lations as the general court may prescribe. 

Art. LII. The general court, by concurrent vote of the 
two houses, may take a recess or recesses amounting to not 
more than thirty days; but no such recess shall extend beyond 
the sixtieth day from the date of their first assembling. 

Art. LIII. Article X of Section I of Chapter II of the con- 
stitution, the last two paragraphs of Article IV of the articles 
of amendment, relating to the appointment of a commissary 
general and the removal of militia officers, and Article V of 
the articles of amendment are hereby annulled, and the follow- 
ing is adopted in place thereof: 

Article X. All military and naval officers shall be selected 
and appointed and may be removed in such manner as the 
general court may by law prescribe, but no such officer shall 
be appointed unless he shall have passed an examination pre- 
pared by a competent commission or shall have served one 
year in either the federal or state militia or in military service. 
All such officers who are entitled by law to receive commis- 
sions shall be commissioned by the governor. 

Art. LIV. Article VII of Section I of Chapter II of the 
constitution is hereby annulled and the following is adopted 
in place thereof: 

Article VII. The general court shall provide by law for 
the recruitment, equipment, organization, training and dis- 



Constitution of MassacJmsetts — Amendments. 119 

cipline of the military and naval forces. The governor shall 
be the commander-in-chief thereof, and shall have power to 
assemble the whole or any part of them for training, instruc- 
tion or parade, and to employ them for the suppression of re- 
bellion, the repelling of invasion, and the enforcement of the 
laws. He may, as authorized by the general court, prescribe 
from time to time the organization of the military and naval 
forces and make regulations for their government. 

Art. LV. Article VI of Section III of Chapter II of the 
constitution is hereby annulled and the following is adopted in 
place thereof: 

Whenever the offices of governor and lieutenant-governor 
shall both be vacant, by reason of death, absence from the 
commonwealth, or otherwise, then one of the following ofificers, 
in the order of succession herein named, namely, the secretary, 
attorney-general, treasurer and receiver-general, and auditor, 
shall, during such vacancy, have full power and authority to 
do and execute all and every such acts, matters and things as 
the governor or the lieutenant-governor might or could law- 
fully do or execute, if they, or either of them, were personally 
present. 

Art. LVI. The governor, within five days after any bill 
or resolve shall have been laid before him, shall have the right 
to return it to the branch of the general court in which it origi- 
nated with a recommendation that any amendment or amend- 
ments specified by him be made therein. Such bill or resolve 
shall thereupon be before the general court and subject to 
amendment and re-enactment. If such bill or resolve is re- 
enacted in any form it shall again be laid before the governor 
for his action, but he shall have no right to return the same a 
second time with a recommendation to amend. 

Art. LVII. Article IV of the articles of amendment of the 
constitution of the commonwealth is hereby amended by add- 
ing thereto the following words: — Women shall be eligible 
to appointment as notaries public. [Change of name shall 
render the commission void, but shall not prevent reappoint- 
ment under the new name.] [See Amendments, Art. LXIX.] 



120 Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments. 

Art. LVIII. Article I of Chapter III of Part the Second 
of the constitution is hereby amended by the addition of the 
following words: — and provided also that the governor, with 
the consent of the council, may after due notice and hearing 
retire them because of advanced age or mental or physical 
disability. Such retirement shall be subject to any provisions 
made by law as to pensions or allowances payable to such 
officers upon their voluntary retirement. 

Art. LIX, Every charter, franchise or act of incorporation 
shall forever remain subject to revocation and amendment. 

Art. LX. The general court shall have power to limit 
buildings according to their use or construction to specified 
districts of cities and towns. 

Art. LXI. The general court shall have authority to pro- 
vide for compulsory voting at elections, but the right of secret 
voting shall be preserved. 

Art. LXII. Section 1. The credit of the common- 
wealth shall not in any manner be given or loaned to or in aid 
of any individual, or of any private association, or of any cor- 
poration which is privately owned and managed. 

Section 2. The commonwealth may borrow money to 
repel invasion, suppress insurrection, defend the common- 
wealth, or to assist the United States in case of war, and may 
also borrow money in anticipation of receipts from taxes or 
other sources, such loan to be paid out of the revenue of the 
year in which it is created. 

Section 3. In addition to the loans which may be con- 
tracted as before provided, the commonwealth may borrow 
money only by a vote, taken by the yeas and nays, of two- 
thirds of each house of the general court present and voting 
thereon. The governor shall recommend to the general court 
the term for which any loan shall be contracted. 

Section 4. Borrowed money shall not be expended for any 
other purpose than that for which it was borrowed or for the 
reduction or discharge of the principal of the loan 

Art. LXIII. Section 1. Collection of Revenue. — All money 
received on account of the commonwealth from any source 
whatsoever shall be paid into the treasury thereof. 



Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments. 121 

Section 2. The Budget. — Within three weeks after the 
convening of the general court the governor shall recommend 
to the general court a budget which shall contain a statement 
of all proposed expenditures of the commonwealth for the 
fiscal year, including those already authorized by law, and of 
all taxes, revenues, loans and other means by which such 
expenditures shall be defrayed. This shall be arranged in such 
form as the general court may by law prescribe, or, in default 
thereof, as the governor shall determine. For the purpose of 
preparing his budget, the governor shall have power to require 
any board, commission, officer or department to furnish him 
with any information which he may deem necessary. [See 
Amendments, Arts. LXXII and LXXV.] 

vSection 3. The General Appropriation Bill. — All appro- 
priations based upon the budget to be paid from taxes or 
revenues shall be incorporated in a single bill which shall be 
called the general appropriation bill. The general court may 
increase, decrease, add or omit items in the budget. The 
general court may provide for its salaries, mileage, and ex- 
penses and for necessary expenditures in anticipation of 
appropriations, but before final action on the general appro- 
priation bill it shall not enact any other appropriation bill 
except on recommendation of the governor. The governor 
may at any time recommend to the general court supple- 
mentary budgets which shall be subject to the same procedure 
as the original budget. 

Section 4. Special Appropriatioji Bills. — After final 
action on the general appropriation bill or on recommendation 
of the governor, special appropriation bills may be enacted. 
Such bills shall provide the specific means for defraying the 
appropriations therein contained. 

Section 5. Submission to the Governor. — The governor 
may disapprove or reduce items or parts of items in any bill 
appropriating money. So much of such bill as he approves 
shall upon his signing the same become law. As to each item 
disapproved or reduced, he shall transmit to the house in which 
the bill originated his reason for such disapproval or reduction, 
and the procedure shall then be the same as in the case of a bill 
disapproved as a whole. In case he shall fail so to transmit 



122 Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments. 

his reasons for such disapproval or reduction within five days 
after the bill shall have been presented to him, such items 
shall have the force of law unless the general court by adjourn- 
ment shall prevent such transmission, in which case they shall 
not be law. 

Art. LXIV. [Section 1. The governor, lieutenant-gov- 
ernor, councillors, secretary, treasurer and receiver-general, 
attorney-general, auditor, senators and representatives, shall 
be elected biennially. The governor, lieutenant-governor and 
councillors shall hold their respective offices from the first 
Wednesday in Januar^^ succeeding their election to and includ- 
ing the first Wednesdaj' in January in the third year follow- 
ing their election and until their successors are chosen and 
qualified. The terms of senators and representatives shall 
begin with the first Wednesday in January succeeding their 
election and shall extend to the first Wednesday in January 
in the third year following their election and until their suc- 
cessors are chosen and qualified. The terms of the secretary, 
treasurer and receiver-general, attorney-general and auditor, 
shall begin with the third Wednesdaj^ in Januarj^ succeeding 
their election and shall extend to the third Wednesday in 
January in the third year following their election and until 
their successors are chosen and qualified.] [Section 1 super- 
seded by Amendments, Art. LXXX.] 

Section 2. No person shall be eligible to election to the 
office of treasurer and receiver-general for more than three 
successive terms. 

Section 3. The general court shall assemble every year 
on the first Wednesday in January. [See Amendments, Arts. 
LXXII and LXXV.] 

Section 4. The first election to which this article shall 
apply shall be held on the Tuesday next after the first Monday 
in November in the year nineteen hundred and twenty, and 
thereafter elections for the choice of all the officers before- 
mentioned shall be held biennially on the Tuesday next after 
the first Monday in November. 

Art. LXV. No person elected to the general court shall 
during the term for which he was elected be appointed to any 



Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments. 123 

office created or the emoluments whereof are increased during 
such term, nor receive additional salary or compensation for 
service upon any recess committee or commission except a 
committee appointed to examine a general revision of the 
statutes of the commonwealth when submitted to the general 
court for adoption. 

Art. LXVI. On or before January first, nineteen hundred 
twenty-one, the executive and administrative work of the 
commonwealth shall be organized in not more than twenty 
departments, in one of which every executive and administra- 
tive office, board and commission, except those officers serving 
directly under the governor or the council, shall be placed. 
Such departments shall be under such supervision and regu- 
lation as the general court may from time to time prescribe 
by law. 

Art. LXVII. Article XLVIII of the Amendments to the 
Constitution is hereby amended by striking out, in that part 
entitled "II, Emergency Measures", under the heading "The 
Referendum", the words "A separate vote shall be taken on 
the preamble by call of the yeas and nays, which shall be re- 
corded, and unless the preamble is adopted by two-thirds of 
the members of each House voting thereon, the law shall not 
be an emergency law; but" and substituting the following: — 
A separate vote, which shall be recorded, shall be taken on the 
preamble, and unless the preamble is adopted by two-thirds of 
the members of each House voting thereon, the law shall not 
be an emergencj'- law. Upon the request of two members of the 
Senate or of five members of the House of Representatives, the 
vote on the preamble in such branch shall be taken by call of 
the yeas and nays. But 

Art. LXVIII. Article III of the amendments to the con- 
stitution, as amended, is hereby further amended by striking 
out, in the first line, the word "male". 

Art. LXIX. Section 1. No person shall be deemed to be 
ineligible to hold state, county or municipal office by reason 
of sex. 



124 Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments. 

Section 2. Article IV of the articles of amendment of the 
constitution of the commonwealth, as amended by Article 
LVII of said amendments, is hereby further amended by 
striking out the words " Change of name shall render the com- 
mission void, but shall not prevent reappointment under the 
new name", and inserting in place thereof the following words: 
— Upon the change of name of any woman, she shall re-register 
under her new name and shall pay such fee therefor as shall 
be established by the general court. 

Art. LXX. Article II of the articles of amendment to 
the constitution of the commonwealth is hereby amended 
by adding at the end thereof the following new paragraph : — 

Nothing in this article shall prevent the General Court 
from establishing in any corporate town or towns in this 
commonwealth containing more than six thousand inhabit- 
ants a form of town government providing for a town meet- 
ing limited to such inhabitants of the town as may be elected 
to meet, deliberate, act and vote in the exercise of the cor- 
porate powers of the town subject to such restrictions and 
regulations as the General Court may prescribe; provided, 
that such establishment be with the consent, and on the 
application of a majority of the inhabitants of such town, 
present and voting thereon, pursuant to a vote at a meeting 
duly warned and holden for that purpose. 

Art. LXXI. Article XXI of the articles of amendment is 
hereby annulled and the following is adopted in place thereof: 

Article XXI. In the year nineteen hundred and thirty-five 
and every tenth year thereafter a census of the inhabitants of 
each city and town shall be taken and a special enumeration 
shall be made of the legal voters therein. Said special enu- 
meration shall also specify the number of legal voters residing 
in each precinct of each town containing twelve thousand or 
more inhabitants according to said census and in each ward of 
each city. Each special enumeration shall be the basis for 
determining the representative districts for the ten year period 
beginning with the first Wednesday in the fourth January 
following said special enumeration; provided, that such dis- 
tricts as established in the year nineteen hundred and twenty- 



Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments. 125 

six shall continue in effect until the first Wednesday in Jan- 
uary in the year nineteen hundred and thirtj^-nine. 

The house of representatives shall consist of two hundred 
and forty members, which shall be apportioned by the general 
court, at its first regular session after the return of each special 
enumeration, to the several counties of the commonwealth, 
equally, as nearly as may be, according to their relative num- 
bers of legal voters, as ascertained by said special enumera- 
tion; and the town of Cohasset. in the county of Norfolk, shall, 
for this purpose, as well as in the formation of districts as 
hereinafter provided, be considered a part of the county of 
Plymouth; and it shall be the duty of the secretary of the 
commonwealth to certify, as soon as may be after it is deter- 
mined by the general court, the number of representatives to 
which each county shall be entitled, to the board authorized 
to divide such county into representative districts. The county 
commissioners or other body acting as such or, in lieu thereof, 
such board of special commissioners in each county as may for 
that purpose be provided by law, shall, within thirty days 
after such certification by the secretary of the commonwealth 
or within such other period as the general court may by law 
provide, assemble at a shire town of their respective counties, 
and proceed, as soon as may be, to divide the same into rep- 
resentative districts of contiguous territory and assign repre- 
sentatives thereto, so that each representative in such county 
will represent an equal number of legal voters, as nearly as 
may be; and such districts shall be so formed that no town 
containing less than twelve thousand inhabitants according 
to said census, no precinct of any other town and no ward of 
a city shall be divided therefor, nor shall any district be made 
which shall be entitled to elect more than three representa- 
tives. The general court may by law limit the time within 
which judicial proceedings may be instituted calling in ques- 
tion any such apportionment, division or assignment. Every 
representative, for one year at least immediately preceding his 
election, shall have been an inhabitant of the district for which 
he is chosen, and shall cease to represent such district when he 
shall cease to be an inhabitant of the commonwealth. The 
districts in each countv shall be numbered bv the board creat- 



126 Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments. 

ing the same, and a description of each, with the numbers 
thereof and the number of legal voters therein, shall be returned 
by the board, to the secretary of the commonwealth, the 
county treasurer of such county, and to the clerk of every city 
or town in such county, to be filed and kept in their respective 
offices. The manner of calling and conducting the elections 
for the choice of representatives, and of ascertaining their 
election, shall be prescribed bj' law. 

Article XXII of the articles of amendment is hereby an- 
nulled and the following is adopted in place thereof: 

Article XXII. Each special enumeration of legal voters 
required in the preceding article of amendment shall likewise 
be the basis for determining the senatorial districts and also 
the councillor districts for the ten year period beginning with 
the first Wednesday in the fourth Januarj^ following such 
enumeration; provided, that such districts as established in 
the year nineteen hundred and twenty-six shall continue in 
effect until the first Wednesday in January in the year nine- 
teen hundred and thirty-nine. The senate shall consist of 
forty members. The general court shall, at its first regular 
session after the return of each special enumeration, divide 
the commonwealth into forty districts of contiguous territory, 
each district to contain, as nearly as may be, an equal number 
of legal voters, according to said special enumeration; pro- 
vided, however, that no town or ward of a city shall be di- 
vided therefor; and such districts shall be formed, as nearly 
as may be, without uniting two counties, or parts of two or 
more counties, into one district. The general court may by 
law limit the time within which judicial proceedings may be 
instituted calling in question such division. Each district 
shall elect one senator, who shall have been an inhabitant of 
this commonwealth five years at least immediately preceding 
his election, and at the time of his election shall be an inhabit- 
ant of the district for which he is chosen; and he shall cease 
to represent such senatorial district when he shall cease to be 
an inhabitant of the commonwealth. 

Art. LXXII. [Section 1. The general court shall assemble 
n regular session on the first Wednesday of January in the 



Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments. 127 

year following the approval of this article and biennially on 
said Wednesday thereafter. Nothing herein contained shall 
prevent the general court from assembling at such other 
times as they shall judge necessary or when called together 
by the governor. 

Section 2. The budget required by section two of Article 
LXIII of the amendments to the constitution shall be for the 
year in which the same is adopted and for the ensuing year. 

Section 3. All provisions of this constitution and of the 
amendments thereto requiring the general court to meet 
annually are hereby annulled.] [Annulled by Amendments, 
Art. LXXV.] 

Art. LXXIII. Article VIII of section I of chapter II of 
Part the Second of the constitution of the commonwealth 
is hereby annulled and the following is adopted in place 
thereof: — 

Article VIII. The power of pardoning offences, except 
such as persons may be convicted of before the senate by an 
impeachment of the house, shall be in the governor, by and 
with the advice of council, provided, that if the offence is a 
felony the general court shall have power to prescribe the 
terms and conditions upon which a pardon may be granted; 
but no charter of pardon, granted by the governor, with ad- 
vice of the council before conviction, shall avail the party 
pleading the same, notwithstanding any general or particular 
expressions contained therein, descriptive of the offence or 
offences intended to be pardoned. 

Art. LXXIV. Section 1. Article XLVIII of the amend- 
ments to the constitution is hereby amended by striking 
out section three, under the heading "The Initiative. 
//. Initiative Petitions." , and inserting in place thereof the 
following: — Section 3. Mode of Originating. — vSuch peti- 
tion shall first be signed by ten qualified voters of the com- 
monwealth and shall be submitted to the attorne3'-general 
not later than the first Wednesday of the August before the 
assembling of the general court into which it is to be intro- 
duced, and if he shall certify that the measure and the title 



128 Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments. 

thereof are in proper form for submission to the people, and 
that the measure is not, either affirmatively or negatively, 
substantially the same as any measure which has been quali- 
fied for submission or submitted to the people at either of the 
two preceding biennial state elections, and that it contains 
only subjects not excluded from the popular initiative and 
which are related or which are mutually dependent, it vaa.y 
then be filed with the secretary of the commonwealth. The 
secretary of the commonwealth shall provide blanks for the 
use of subsequent signers, and shall print at the top of each 
blank a fair, concise summary, as determined by the attorney- 
general, of the proposed measure as such summary will appear 
on the ballot together with the names and residences of the 
first ten signers. All initiative petitions, with the first ten 
signatures attached, shall be filed with the secretary of the 
commonwealth not earlier than the first Wednesday of the 
September before the assembling of the general court into 
which they are to be introduced, and the remainder of the 
required signatures shall be filed not later than the first 
Wednesday of the following December. 

Section 2. Section three of that part of said Article 
XLVI 1 1, under the heading "The Referendum. ///. Refer- 
endum Petitions.", is hereby amended by striking out the 
words "The secretary of the commonwealth shall provide 
blanks for the use of subsequent signers, and shall print at the 
top of each blank a description of the proposed law as such 
description will appear on the ballot together with the names 
and residences of the first ten signers.", and inserting in place 
thereof the words "The secretary of the commonwealth shall 
provide blanks for the use of subsequent signers, and shall 
print at the top of each blank a fair, concise summary of the 
proposed law as such summary will appear on the ballot 
together with the names and residences of the first ten signers." 

Section 3. Section four of that part of said Article XLVIII, 
under the heading "The Referendum. III. Referendum 
Petitions.", is hereby amended by striking out the words 
"The secretary of the commonwealth shall provide blanks 
for the use of subsequent signers, and shall print at the top 
of each blank a description of the proposed law as such de- 



CunstiUition of Massachusetts — Amendments. 129 

scription will appear on the ballot together with the name 
and residences of the first ten signers.", and inserting in 
place thereof the words "The secretary of the common- 
wealth shall provide blanks for the use of subsequent signers, 
and shall print at the top of each blank a fair, concise summary 
of the proposed law as such summary will appear on the ballot 
together with the names and residences of the first ten signers." 
Section 4. Said Article XLVIII is hereby further amended 
by striking out, under the heading "General Provisions", 
all of subheading "777. Form of Ballot.'' and all of subheading 
"7F. Information for Voters.'', and inserting in place thereof 
the following : — 

777. Form of Ballot. 

A fair, concise summary, as determined by the attorney 
general, subject to such provision as may be made by law, of 
each proposed amendment to the constitution, and each law 
submitted to the people, shall be printed on the ballot, and 
the secretary of the commonwealth shall give each question 
a number and cause such question, except as otherwise author- 
ized herein, to be printed on the ballot in the following form: — 

In the case of an amendment to the constitution: Do you 
approve of the adoption of an amendment to 
the constitution summarized below, (here 
state, in distinctive type, whether approved 
or disapproved by the general court, and by what vote 
thereon) ? 

(Set forth summary here) 

In the case of a law: Do you approve of a 
law summarized below, (here state, in distinc- 
tive type, whether approved or disapproved 



1 YKS. 




NO. 





YES. 

NoT 



by the general court, and by what vote thereon)? 
(Set forth summary here) 

IV. Information for Voters. 

The secretary of the commonwealth shall cause to be 
printed and sent to each registered voter in the common- 
wealth the full text of every measure to be submitted to the 
people, together with a copy of the legislative committee's 



130 Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments. 

majority and minority reports, if there be such, with the 
names of the majority and minority members thereon, a 
statement of the votes of the general court on the measure, 
and a fair, concise summary of the measure as such summary 
will appear on the ballot; and shall, in such manner as may 
be provided bj' law, cause to be prepared and sent to the voters 
other information and arguments for and against the measure. 

Art. LXXV. Article LXXII of the amendments to the 
constitution providing for biennial sessions of the general 
court and a biennial budget is hereby annulled, and all pro- 
visions of this constitution and of the amendments thereto 
which were annulled or affected by said Article shall have the 
same force and effect as though said Article had not been 
adopted. 

Art. LXXVI. Article XLV of the articles of amendment 
is hereby annulled and the following is adopted in place 
thereof: — 

Article XLV. The general court shall have power to 
provide bj' law for voting, in the choice of any officer to be 
elected or upon any question submitted at an election, by 
qualified voters of the commonwealth who, at the time of 
such an election, are absent from the city or town of which 
they are inhabitants or are unable by reason of physical 
disability to cast their votes in person at the polling places. 

Art. LXXVII. Article XVI of Part the First is hereby an- 
nulled and the following is adopted in place thereof: — 

Article XVI. The liberty of the press is essential to the 
security of freedom in a state: it ought not, therefore, to be 
restrained in this commonwealth. The right of free speech 
shall not be abridged. 

Art. LXXVIII. No revenue from fees, duties, excises or 
license taxes relating to registration, operation or use of vehi- 
cles on public highways, or to fuels used for propelling such 
vehicles, shall be expended for other than cost of administra- 
tion of laws providing for such revenue, making of refunds 
and adjustments in relation thereto, payment of highway ob- 



Constitution oj Massachusens — Amendments. 131 

ligations, or cost of construction, reconstruction, maintenance 
and repair of public highways and bridges and of the enforce- 
ment of state traffic laws; and such revenue shall be expended 
by the commonwealth or its counties, cities and towns for 
said highway purposes only and in such manner as the general 
court may direct; provided, that this amendment shall not 
apph^ to revenue from any excise tax imposed in lieu of local 
property taxes for the privilege of registering such vehicles. 

Art. LXXIX. Article XVII of the Amendments of the Con- 
stitution, as amended, is hereby further amended by striking 
out, in the third sentence, the words "two persons who had 
the highest number of votes for said offices on the day in 
November aforesaid" and inserting in place thereof the 
words: — people at large, — so that said sentence will read 
as follows: — In case of a failure to elect either of said officers 
on the day in November aforesaid, or in case of the decease, 
in the meantime, of the person elected as such, such officer 
shall be chosen on or before the third Wednesday in January 
next thereafter, from the people at large, by joint ballot of the 
senators and representatives, in one room; and in case the 
office of secretary, or treasurer and receiver-general, or auditor, 
or attornej'-general, shall become vacant, from any cause, 
during an annual or special session of the general court, such 
vacancy shall in like manner be filled by choice from the 
people at large; but if such vacancy shall occur at any other 
time, it shall be supplied by the governor by appointment, 
with the advice and consent of the council. 

Art. LXXX. Article LXIV of the Amendments to the Con- 
stitution is hereby amended by striking out section 1 and 
inserting in place thereof the following section : — 

Section 1. The governor, lieutenant-governor, councillors, 
secretary, treasurer and receiver-general, attorney-general, 
auditor, senators and representatives shall be elected bien- 
nially. The terms of the governor, lieutenant-governor and 
councillors shall begin at noon on the Thursday next following 
the first Wednesday in January succeeding their election and 
shall end at noon on the Thursday next following the first 



132 Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments. 

Wednesday in January in the third year following their elec- 
tion. If the governor elect shall have died before the quali- 
fication of the lieutenant-governor elect, the lieutenant- 
governor elect upon qualification shall become governor. If 
both the governor elect and the lieutenant-governor elect 
shall have died both said offices shall be deemed to be vacant 
and the provisions of Article LV of the Amendments to the 
Constitution shall apply. The terms of senators and repre- 
sentatives shall begin with the first Wednesday in January 
succeeding their election and shall extend to the first Wednes- 
day in January in the third year following their election and 
until their successors are chosen and qualified. The terms of 
the secretary, treasurer and receiver-general, attorney-general 
and auditor, shall begin with the third Wednesday in January 
succeeding their election and shall extend to the third Wednes- 
day in January in the third year following their election and 
until their successors are chosen and qualified. 

Art. LXXXI. Section 1. Article XLVIII of the Amend- 
ments to the Constitution is hereby amended by striking out 
section 2, under the heading "the initiative. IV. Legisla- 
tive Action on Proposed Constitutional Amendments", and 
inserting in place thereof the following: — 

Section 2. Joint Session. — If a proposal for a specific 
amendment of the constitution is introduced into the general 
court by initiative petition signed in the aggregate by not 
less than such number of voters as will equal three per cent 
of the entire vote cast for governor at the preceding biennial 
state election, or if in case of a proposal for amendment intro- 
duced into the general court by a member of either house, 
consideration thereof in joint session is called for by vote of 
either house, such proposal shall, not later than the second 
Wednesday in May, be laid before a joint session of the two 
houses, at which the president of the senate shall preside; 
and if the two houses fail to agree upon a time for holding 
any joint session hereby required, or fail to continue the same 
from time to time until final action has been taken upon all 
amendments pending, the governor shall call such joint session 
or continuance thereof. 



Constitution oj Massachusetts — Amendments. 133 

Section 2. Section 1 of that part of said Article XLVIII. 
under the heading "the INITIATIVE. V, Legislative Action on 
Proposed Laws.", is hereby amended by striking out said 
section and inserting in place thereof the following : — 

Section 1. Legislative Procedure. — If an initiative petition 
for a law is introduced into the general court, signed in the 
aggregate by not less than such number of voters as vvill equal 
three per cent of the entire vote cast for governor at the 
preceding biennial state election, a vote shall be taken by 
yeas and nays in both houses before the first Wednesday of 
May upon the enactment of such law in the form in which it 
stands in such petition. If the general court fails to enact 
such law before the first Wednesday of May, and if such 
petition is completed by filing with the secretary of the com- 
monwealth, not earlier than the first Wednesday of the fol- 
lowing June nor later than the first Wednesday of the following 
July, a number of signatures of qualified voters equal in 
number to not less than one half of one per cent of the entire 
vote cast for governor at the preceding biennial state election, 
in addition to those signing such initiative petition, which 
signatures must have been obtained after the first Wednesday 
of May aforesaid, then the secretary of the commonwealth 
shall submit such proposed law to the people at the next 
state election. If it shall be approved by voters equal in 
number to at least thirty per cent of the total number of 
ballots cast at such state election and also by a majority of 
the voters voting on such law, it shall become law, and shall 
take effect in thirty days after such state election or at such 
time after such election as may be provided in such law. 

Section 3. Section 2 of that part of said Article XLVIII, 
under the heading "the initiative. V. Legislative Action 
on Proposed Laws.", is hereby amended hy striking out said 
section and inserting in place thereof the following: — 

Section 2. Amendment by Petitioners. — If the general 
court fails to pass a proposed law before the first Wednesday 
of May, a majority of the first ten signers of the initiative 
petition therefor shall have the right, subject to certification 
by the attorney-general filed as hereinafter provided, to 
amend the measure which is the subject of such petition. An 



134 Constitution oj Massachusetts — Amendments. 

amendment so made shall not invalidate any signature at- 
tached to the petition. If the measure so amended, signed 
by a majority of the first ten signers, is filed with the secretary 
of the commonwealth before the first Wednesday of the fol- 
lowing June, together with a certificate signed by the attorney- 
general to the effect that the amendment made by such 
proposers is in his opinion perfecting in its nature and does 
not materially change the substance of the measure, and if 
such petition is completed by filing with the secretary of the 
commonwealth, not earlier than the first Wednesday of the 
following June nor later than the first Wednesday of the 
following July, a number of signatures of qualified voters 
equal in number to not less than one half of one per cent of 
the entire vote cast for governor at the preceding biennial 
state election in addition to those signing such initiative 
petition, which signatures must have been obtained after the 
first Wednesday of May aforesaid, then the secretary of the 
commonwealth shall submit the measure to the people in its 
amended form. 

Section 4. Section 3 of that part of said Article XLVIII, 
under the heading "the referendum. ///. Referendum 
Fetitions.", is hereby amended by striking out the sentence 
"If such petition is completed by filing with the secretary of 
the commonwealth not later than ninety days after the law 
which is the subject of the petition has become law the signa- 
tures of not less than fifteen thousand qualified voters of the 
commonwealth, then the operation of such law shall be sus- 
pended, and the secretary of the commonwealth shall submit 
such law to the people at the next state election, if thirty 
days intervene between the date when such petition is filed 
with the secretary of the commonwealth and the date for 
holding such state election; if thirty days do not so intervene, 
then such law shall be submitted to the people at the next 
following state election, unless in the meantime it shall have 
been repealed; and if it shall be approved by a majority of 
the qualified voters voting thereon, such law shall, subject to 
the provisions of the constitution, take effect in thirty days 
after such election, or at such time after such election as may 
be provided in such law; if not so approved such law shall 



Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments. 135 

be null and void ; but no such law shall be held to be dis- 
approved if the negative vote is less than thirty per cent of 
the total number of ballots cast at such state election." and 
inserting in place thereof the following sentence: — If such 
petition is completed by filing with the secretary of the com- 
monwealth not later than ninety days after the law which is 
the subject of the petition has become law a number of signa- 
tures of qualified voters equal in number to not less than 
two per cent of the entire vote cast for governor at the pre- 
ceding biennial state election, then the operation of such law 
shall be suspended, and the secretary of the commonwealth 
shall submit such law to the people at the next state election, 
if sixty days intervene between the date when such petition 
is filed with the secretary of the commonwealth and the date 
for holding such state election; if sixty days do not so inter- 
vene, then such law shall be submitted to the people at the 
next following state election, unless in the meantime it shall 
have been repealed ; and if it shall be approved by a majority 
of the qualified voters voting thereon, such law shall, subject 
to the provisions of the constitution, take effect in thirty 
days after such election, or at such time after such election 
as may be provided in such law; if not so approved such law 
shall be null and void; but no such law shall be held to be 
disapproved if the negative vote is less than thirty per cent 
of the total number of ballots cast at such state election. 

Section 5. Section 4 of that part of said Article XLVIII, 
under the heading "the referendum. ///. Referendum 
Petitions.", is hereby amended by striking out the words 
"If such petition filed as aforesaid is completed by filing with 
the secretary of the commonwealth not later than ninety days 
after the law which is the subject of the petition has become 
law the signatures of not less than ten thousand qualified 
voters of the commonwealth protesting against such law and 
asking for a referendum thereon, then the secretary of the 
commonwealth shall submit such law to the people at the 
next state election, if thirty'' days intervene between the date 
when such petition is filed with the secretary of the common- 
wealth and the date for holding such state election, If thirty 
days do not so intervene, then it shall be submitted to the 



136 Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments. 

people at the next following state election, unless in the mean- 
time it shall have been repealed; and if it shall not be ap- 
proved by a majority of the qualified voters voting thereon, 
it shall, at the expiration of thirty days after such election, 
be thereby repealed; but no such law shall be held to be 
disapproved if the negative vote is less than thirty per cent 
of the total number of ballots cast at such state election." 
and inserting in place thereof the following: — If such peti- 
tion filed as aforesaid is completed by filing with the secretary 
of the commonwealth not later than ninety days after the 
law which is the subject of the petition has become law a 
number of signatures of qualified voters equal in number to 
not less than one and one half per cent of the entire vote cast 
for governor at the preceding biennial state election protesting 
against such law and asking for a referendum thereon, then 
the secretary of the commonwealth shall submit such law to 
the people at the next state election, if sixty days intervene 
between the date when such petition is filed with the secre- 
tary of the commonwealth and the date for holding such 
state election. If sixty days do not so intervene, then it 
shall be submitted to the people at the next following state 
election, unless in the meantime it shall have been repealed; 
and if it shall not be approved by a majority of the qualified 
voters voting thereon, it shall, at the expiration of thirty 
days after such election, be thereby repealed; but no such 
law shall be held to be disapproved if the negative vote is 
less than thirty per cent of the total number of ballots cast 
at such state election. 

[Note. — Soon after the Declaration of Independence, steps were 
taken in Massachusetts toward framing a Constitution or Form of 
Government. The Council and House of Representatives, or the Gen- 
eral Court of 1777-78, in accordance with a recommendation of the Gen- 
eral Court, of the previous year, met together as a Convention, and 
adopted a form of Constitution "for the State of Massachusetts Bay." 
which was submitted to the people, and by them rejected. This at- 
tempt to form a Constitution having proved unsuccessful, the General 
Court on the 20th of February, 1779, passed a Resolve calhng upon the 
qualified voters to give in their votes upon the questions — Whether 
they chose to have a new Constitution or Form of Government made. 



i 



Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments. 137 

and, Whether they will empower their representatives to vote for calling 
a State Convention for that purpose. A large majority of the inhabitants 
having voted in the affirmative to both these questions, the General 
Court, on the 17th of June, 1779, passed a Resolve calling upon the in- 
habitants to meet and choose delegates to a Constitutional Convention, 
to be held at Cambridge, on the 1st of September, 1779. The Conven- 
tion met at time and place appointed, and organized by choosing James 
Bowdoin, President, and Samuel Barrett, Secretary. On the 11th of 
November the Convention adjourned, to meet at the Representatives' 
Chamber, in Boston, January 5th, 1780. On the 2d of March, of the 
same year, a form of Constitution having been agreed upon, a Resolve 
was passed by which the same was submitted to the people, and the 
Convention adjourned to meet at the Brattle Street Church, in Boston, 
June the 7th. At that time and place the Convention again met, and 
appointed a Committee to examine the returns of votes from the several 
towns. On the 14th of June the Committee reported, and on the 15th 
the Convention resolved, "That the people of the State of Massachu- 
setts Bay have accepted the Constitution as it stands, in the printed 
form submitted to their revision." A Resolve providing for carrying 
the new Constitution into effect was passed; and the Convention then, 
on the 16th of June, 1780, was finally dissolved. In accordance with 
the Resolves referred to, elections immediately took place in the several 
towns; and the first General Court of the Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts met at the State House, in Boston, on Wednesday, October 
25th, 1780. 

The Constitution contained a provision providing for taking, in 1795, 
the sense of the people as to the expediency or necessity of revising the 
original instrument. But no such revision was deemed necessary at 
that time. On the 16th of June, 1820, an Act was passed by the General 
Court, calling upon the people to meet in their several towns, and give 
in their votes upon the question, "Is it expedient that delegates should 
be chosen to meet in Convention for the purpose of revising or altering 
the Constitution of Government of this Commonwealth?" A large 
majority of the people of the State having voted in favor of revision, the 
Governor issued a proclamation announcing the fact, and calling upon 
the people to vote, in accordance with the provisions of the aforesaid 
Act, for delegates to the proposed Convention. The delegates met at 
the State House, in Boston, November 15, 1820, and organized by choos- 
ing John Adams, President, and Benjamin Pollard, Secretary. Mr. 
Adams, however, declined the appointment, and Isaac Parker was 
chosen in his stead. On the 9th of January, 1821, the Convention 
agreed to fourteen Articles of Amendment, and after passing a Resolve 
providing for submitting the same to the people, and appointing a com- 



138 Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments. 



mittee to meet to count the votes upon the subject, was dissolved. The 
people voted on Monday, April 9th, 1821, and the Committee of the 
Convention met at the State House to count the votes, on Wednesday, 
May 24th. They made their return to the General Court; and at the 
request of the latter the Governor issued his proclamation on the 5th of 
June, 1821, announcing that nine of the fourteen Articles of Amendment 
had been adopted. These articles are numbered in the preceding 
pages from one to nine inclusive. The fifth Article was annulled by 
the fifty-third Article, and the ninth Article by the forty-eighth Article. 

The tenth Article of Amendment was adopted by the General Court 
during the sessions of the political years 1829-30, and 1830-31, and 
was approved and ratified by the people May 11th, 1831. 

The eleventh Article of Amendment was adopted by the General Court 
during the sessions of the years 1832 and 1833, and was approved and 
ratified by the people November Uth, 1833. 

The twelfth Article of Amendment was adopted by the General Court 
during the sessions of the years 1835 and 1836, and was approved and 
ratified by the people November 14th, 1836. 

The thirteenth Article of Amendment was adopted by the General 
Court during the sessions of the years 1839 and 1840, and was approved 
and ratified by the people April 6th, 1840. 

The General Court of the year 1851 passed an Act calling a third Con- 
vention to revise the Constitution. The Act was submitted to the 
people, and a majority voted against the proposed Convention. In 1852, 
on the 7th of May, another Act was passed calling upon the people to 
vote upon the question of calling a Constitutional Convention. A ma- 
jority of the people having voted in favor of the proposed Convention, 
election for delegates thereto took place in March, 1853. The Conven- 
tion met in the State House, in Boston, on the 4th day of May, 1853, 
and organized by choosing Nathaniel P. Banks, Jr., President, and 
William S. Robinson and James T. Robinson, Secretaries. On the 1st of 
August, this Convention agreed to a form of Constitution, and on the 
same day was dissolved, after having provided for submitting the same 
to the people, and appointed a committee to meet to count the votes, 
and to make a return thereof to the General Court. The Committee 
met at the time and place agreed upon, and found that the proposed 
Constitution had been rejected. 

The fourteenth, fifteenth, sixteenth, seventeenth, eighteenth and nine- 
teenth Articles of Amendment were adopted by the General Court dur- 
ing the sessions of the years 1854 and 1855, and were approved and 



Constitutiun of Massachusetts — Amendments. 139 

ratified by the people May 23d, 1855. The eighteenth Article was 
superseded by the forty-sixth Article. 

The twentieth, twenty-first and twenty-second Articles of Amendment 
were adopted by the General Court during the sessions of the years 
1856 and 1857, and were approved and ratified by the people May 1st, 
1857. The twenty-first and twenty-second Articles were annulled and 
superseded by the seventy-first Article. 

The twenty-third Article of Amendment was adopted by the General 
Court during the sessions of the years 1858 and 1859, and was approved 
and ratified by the people May 9th, 1859, and was annulled by the 
twenty-sixth Article. 

The twenty-fourth and twenty-fifth Articles of Amendment were 
adopted by the General Court during the sessions of the years 1859 and 
1860, and were approved and ratified by the people May 7th, 1860. 

The twenty-sixth Article of Amendment was adopted by the General 
Court during the sessions of the years 1862 and 1863, and was approved 
and ratified by the people April 6th, 1863. 

The twenty-seventh Article of Amendment was adopted by the General 
Court during the sessions of the years 1876 and 1877, and was approved 
and ratified by the people on the 6th day of November, 1877. 

The twenty-eighth Article of Amendment was adopted by the General 
Court during the sessions of the years 1880 and 1881, and was approved 
and ratified by the people on the 8th day of November, 1881, 

The twenty-ninth Article of Amendment was adopted by the General 
Court during the sessions of the years 1884 and 1885, and was approved 
and ratified by the people on the 3d day of November, 1885. 

The thirtieth and thirty-first Articles of Amendment were adopted by 
the General Court during the sessions of the years 1889 and 1890, and 
were approved and ratified by the people on the 4th day of November, 
1890. 

The thirty-second and thirty-third Articles of Amendment were adopted 
by the General Court during the sessions of the years 1890 and 1891, and 
were approved and ratified by the people on the 3d day of November, 
1891. 

The thirty-fourth Article of Amendment was adopted by the General 
Court during the sessions of the years 1891 and 1892, and was approved 
and ratified by the people on the 8th day of November, 1892. 



140 Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments. 



The thirty-fifth Article of Amendment was adopted by the General 
Court during the sessions of the years 1892 and 1893, and was approved 
and ratified by the people on the 7th day of November, 1893. 

The thirty-sixth Article of Amendment was adopted by the General 
Court during the sessions of the years 1893 and 1894, and was approved 
and ratified by the people on the 6th day of November, 1894. 

The thirty-seventh Article of Amendment was adopted by the General 
Court during the sessions of the years 1906 and 1907, and was approved 
and ratified by the people on the 5th day of November, 1907. 

The thirty-eighth Article of Amendment was adopted by the General 
Court during the sessions of the years 1909 and 1910, and was approved 
and ratified by the people on the 7th day of November, 1911. 

The thirty-ninth Article of Amendment was adopted by the General 
Court during the sessions of the years 1910 and 1911, and was approved 
and ratified by the people on the 7th day of November, 1911. 

The fortieth and forty-first Articles of Amendment were adopted hy 
the General Court during the sessions of the years 1911 and 1912, and 
were approved and ratified by the people on the 5th day of Novem- 
ber, 1912. 

The forty-second Article of Amendment was adopted by the General 
Court during the sessions of the years 1912 and 1913, and was approved 
and ratified by the people on the 4th day of November, 1913, and was 
annulled by the forty-eighth Article. 

The forty-third and forty-fourth Articles of Amendment were adopted 
by the General Court during the sessions of the years 1914 and 1915, and 
were approved and ratified by the people on the 2d day of November, 
1915. 

In his inaugural address to the General Court of 1916, Governor 
McCall recommended that the question of revising the Constitution, 
through a constitutional Convention, be submitted to the people; and 
the General Court passed a law (chapter 98 of the General Acts of 
1916) to ascertain and carry out the will of the people relative thereto, 
the question to be submitted being "Shall there be a convention to re- 
vise, alter or amend the constitution of the Commonwealth?" The 
people voted on this question at the annual election, held on November 
7, casting 217,293 votes in the affirmative and 120,979 votes in the 
negative; and accordingly the Governor on Dec. 19, 1916, made proc- 
amation to that effect, and, by virtue of authority contained in the 



Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments. 141 

act, called upon the people to elect delegates at a special election to be 
held on the first Tuesday in May, 1917. The election was on May 1. 
In accordance with the provisions of the act, the delegates met at the 
State House on June 6, 1917, and organized by choosing John L. Bates, 
president, and James W. Kimball, secretary. After considering and 
acting adversely on numerous measures that had been brought before 
it, and after providing for submitting to the people the forty-fifth, 
forth-sixth and forty-seventh Articles, at the state election of 1917, 
and the Article relative to the establishment of the popular initiative 
and referendum and the legislative initiative of specific amendments of 
the Constitution (Article forty-eight) at the state election of 1918, the 
Convention adjourned on November 28 "until called by the President 
or Secretary to meet not later than within ten days after the proroga- 
tion of the General Court of 1918." 

The forty-fifth, forty-sixth and forty-seventh Articles of Amendment, 
ordered by the convention to be submitted to the people, were so 
submitted and were approved and ratified on the 6th day of November, 
1917. The forty-fifth Article was annulled and superseded by the 
seventy-sixth Article. 

On Wednesday, June 12, 1918, the convention reassembled and 
resumed its work. Eighteen more articles (Articles forty-nine to sixty- 
six, inclusive) were approved by the convention and were ordered to be 
submitted to the people. On Wednesday, August 21, 1918, the conven- 
tion adjourned, "to meet, subject to call by the President or Secretary, 
not later than within twenty days after the prorogation of the General 
Court of 1919, for the purpose of taking action on the report of the 
special committee on Rearrangement of the Constitution." 

The forty-eighth to the sixty-sixth (inclusive) Articles of Amendment, 
ordered by the convention to be submitted to the people, were so sub- 
mitted and were approved and ratified on the 5th day of November, 
1918. 

On Tuesday, August 12, 1919, pursuant to a call of its President, 
the Convention again convened. A rearrangement of the Constitution 
was adopted, and was ordered to be submitted to the people for their 
ratification. On the following day, a sub-committee of the Special 
Committee on Rearrangement of the Constitution was "emiwwered 
to correct clerical and typographical errors and establish the text of 
the rearrangement of the Constitution to be submitted to the people, 
in conformity with that adopted by the Convention. " On Wednesday, 
.August 13, 1919, the Convention adjourned, sine die. On Tuesday, 
November 4, 1919, the rearrangement was approved and ratified by 



142 Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments. 

the people; but, as to the effect thereof, see Opinion of the Justices, 
233 Mass. 603; and Loring v. Young, decided August 8, 1921 [see 239 
Mass. 349]. [For text of the Rearrangement, see Manuals for the years 
1920 to 1932. inclusive.] 

The sixty-seventh Article of Amendment was adopted by the General 
Court during the sessions of the years 1920 and 1921, and was ap- 
proved and ratified by the people on the 7th day of November, 1922. 

The sixty-eighth and sixty-ninth Article? of Amendment were adopted 
by the General Court during the sessions of the years 1921 and 1923, 
and were approved and ratified by the people on the 4th day of Novem- 
ber, 1924. 

The seventieth Article of Amendment was adopted by the General 
Court during the sessions of the years 1924 and 1925, and was approved 
and ratified by the people on the 2d day of November, 1926, 

The seventy-first Article of Amendment was adopted by the General 
Court during the sessions of the years 1928 and 1930, and was approved 
and ratified by the people on the 4th day of November, 1930. 

The seventy-second Article of Amendment (introduced by initiative 
petition) was approved by the General Court during the sessions of 
the years 1936 and 1937, and by the people on the 8th day of Novem- 
ber, 1938, and was annulled by the seventy-fifth Article. 

The seventy-third, seventy-fourth, seventy-fifth and seventy-sixth Articles 
of Amendment were adopted by the General Court during the sessions 
of the years 1941 and 1943, and were approved and ratified by the people 
on the 7th day of November, 1944. 

The seventy-seventh Article of Amendment was adopted by the 
General Court during the sessions of the years 1945 and 1947, and 
was approved and ratified by the people on the 2d day of November, 
1948. 

The seventy-eighth Article of Amendment was adopted by the Gen- 
eral Court during the sessions of the years 1946 and 1947, and was 
approved and ratified by the people on the 2d day of November, 1948. 

The seventy-ninth Article of Amendment was adopted by the General 
Court during the sessions of the years 1946 and 1948, and was ap- 
proved and ratified by the people on the 2d day of November, 1948. 



Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments. 143 

The eightieth Article of Amendment was adopted by the General 
Court during the sessions of the years 1947 and 1949, and was ap- 
proved and ratified by the people on the 7th day of November, 1950. 

The eighty-first Article of Amendment was adopted by the General 
Court during the sessions of the years 1948 and 1949, and was ap- 
proved and ratified by the people on the 7th day of November, 1950.] 

AMENDMENTS REJECTED BY THE PEOPLE. 

[A proposed Article of Amendment prohibiting the manufacture 
and sale of Intoxicating Liquor as a beverage, adopted by the General 
Court during the sessions of the years 1888 and 1889, was rejected by 
the people on the twenty-second day of April, 1889.] 

[Proposed Articles of Amendment, (1) Establishing biennial elec- 
tions of state officers, and (2) Establishing biennial elections of members 
of the General Court, adopted by the General Court during the ses- 
sions of the years 1895 and 1896, were rejected by the people at the 
annual election held on the third day ot November, 1896]. 

[A proposed Article of Amendment to make Women eligible to 
appointment as Notaries Public, adopted by the General Court during 
the sessions of the years 1912 and 1913, was rejected by the people on 
the fourth day of November, 1913.] 

[A proposed Article of Amendment enabling Women to vote, adopted 
by the General Court during the sessions of the years 1914 and 1915, 
was rejected by the people on the second day of November, 1915.] 

[A proposed Article of .\mendment to give the General Court the 
power to pass an income tax at graduated or proportioned rates, adopted 
by the General Court during the sessions of the years 1959 and 1961, 
Wcis rejected by the people on the sixth day of November, 1962.] 



THE STATE HOUSE, 

SEAL OF THE COMMONWEALTH, 

STATE LIBRARY, ETC. 



THE STATE HOUSE. 



The "Bulfinch Front" of the State House was erected in 1795-7, 
upon land purchased of the heirs of John Hancock, by the town of 
Boston, for the sum of £4,000, and conveyed by said town to the 
Commonwealth, May 2, 1795. The Commissioners on the part of 
the town to convey the "Governor's Pasture," as it was styled, to 
the Commonwealth, were William Tudor, Charles Jarvis, John Coffin 
Jonea, William Eustis, William Little, Thomas Dawes, Joseph Russell, 
Harrison Gray Otis and Perez Morton. The agents for erecting the 
State House were named in the deed as toUows: Thomas Dawes, 
Edward Hutchinson Robbins and Charles Bulfinch. 

The corner stone was laid July 4, 1795, by Governor Samuel Adams, 
assisted by Paul Revere, Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Masons. 
The stone was drawn to the spot by fifteen white horses, representing 
the number of States of the Union at that time. The original build- 
ing is 172 feet front; the height, from base course to pinnacle, is 155 
feet; and the foundation is about 106 feet above the waters of the 
bay. The dome is 53 feet in diameter and 35 feet high. The origi- 
nal cost ot the building was estimated at $133,333.33. 

Extensive improvements, including the " Bryant addition" extending 
backward upon Mount Vernon Street, were made, chiefly under the 
direction of a commission, in the years 1853, 1854 and 1855. 

Under a resolve of 1866 a commission was appointed to inquire and 
report concerning the whole subject of remodelling or rebuilding the 
State House. They reported three propositions, without deciding in 
favor of any. The first was a plan of remodelling at an expense of 
$375,430; the second, a plan of remodelling at an expense of $759,- 
872; and the third, a plan for a new building at an expense of $2,- 
042,574. The report of the commission was referred to the committee 
on the State House of the session of 1867, who recommended a plan 
of alterations at the estimated expense of $150,000; and by Resolve 
No. 84 of that year the work was ordered to be executed under the 
supervision of a commission consisting of the President of the Senate 
and the Speaker of the House of Representatives, who were authorized 
by the same resolve to expend $150,000, and, by a subsequent resolve, 
$20,000 in addition. The President of the Senate died on the 28th of 
October, and thereafter the w^ork was continued by the surviving 



148 The Stale House. 

commissioner. The improvements consisted of an almost entire re- 
construction of the interior of tlie building, except the "Bryant ad- 
dition," before referred to as having been added from 1853 to 1855. 
They were executed from the plans of the architects, Washburn & Son, 
and cost, including furniture, $270,256.96. 

The Legislature of 1868 made provision for reseating the Senate 
Chamber and the Hall of the House, which improvements were made 
under the supervision of legislative committees, in season for the 
accommodation of the Legislature of 1869, at a cost of about $6,500. 

By Resolve No. 68 of the year 1881, the sum of $45,000 was au- 
thorized to be expended for improving the basement of the State 
House, in accordance with plans submitted by the joint standing 
committee on the State House. The work was begun soon after the 
regular session of 1881, and was carried on under the supervision of 
the commissioners on the State House, consisting of Oreb F. Mitchell, 
Sergeant-at-Arms, Hon. Daniel A. Gleason, Treasurer and Receiver- 
General, and Hon. Henry B. Peirce. Secretary of State, assisted by 
John W. Leighton and Asa H. Caton, both of Boston, and appointed, 
under the resolve referred to, by the Governor and Council. Under 
the plans the floor of the basement was brought down to a common 
level, and numerous additional office rooms and needed accommoda- 
tions were obtained. 

Under authority of chapter 70 of the Resolves of 1885, passenger 
elevators were erected in the east and west ends of the building. 

In accordance with the provisions of chapter 349 of the Acts of the 
year 1888, the Governor and Council, "for the purpose of providing 
suitable and adequate accommodations for the legislative and executive 
departments of the State government and for the several bureaus, 
boards and officers of the Commonwealth, whose offices are, or may 
be, located in tJie city of Boston, and for any other necessary and 
convenient uses oi the Commonwealth," on November 7 of the same 
year, took possession in the name of the Commonwealth of the parcel 
of land lying next north of the State House, and bounded by Derne, 
Temple. Mount Vernon and Hancock streets, and also of a parcel of 
land lying to the east of Temple Street, between Mount Vernon and 
Derne streets, both lots with the buildings and improvements thereon, 
full power being given them to settle, by agreement or arbitration, 
the amount of compensation to be paid any person by reason of the 
taking of his property. They were also authorized to discontinue the 
whole of Temple Street between Mount Vernon and Derne streets, 
and to negotiate with the city of Boston concerning the construction 
of new streets or ways. 

By chapter 404 of the Acts of 1892, for the purpose of securing an 
open space around the State House, the commissioners were authorized 



The State House. 149 

to take, by purchase or otherwise, the land bounded north by Derne 
Street, east by Bowdoin Street, south by Beacon Hill Place and west 
by the State House, and by chapter 129, Acts of 1893, they were 
authorized to sell the buildings thereon. Subsequently, the com- 
missioners were authorized to take Beacon Hill Place (chapter 450, 
Acts of 1893) and also the land bounded east by Bowdoin Street, 
south by Beacon Street, west by Mount Vernon Street and north by 
the land then owned by the Commonwealth; and provision was made 
for the removal of buildings on said land and for the improvement 
thereof (chapter 532, Acts of 1894; chapter 223, Acts ot 1897; chapter 
382, Acts of 1900; and chapter 525, Acts of 1901). In 1901 authority 
was given to the Governor, with the advice and consent of the Council, 
to take in fee simple, in behalf of the Commonwealth, a parcel of 
land, with the buildings thereon, on the southerly side of Mount 
Vernon Street, immediately west of Hancock Avenue (chapter 525, 
Acts of 1901). 

By chapter 92 of the Resolves of 1888, the Governor and Council 
were allowed a sum not exceeding $5,000 to enable them to devise 
and report to the next General Court a general plan for the better 
accommodation of the State government. 

A plan was accordingly submitted to the General Court of 1889, and 
$2,500 were appropriated for the further perfecting of said plan. A 
bill to provide for the enlargement of the State House was subsequently 
reported in the Legislature and became a law (chapter 394 of the Acts 
of 1889). Under this act the Governor was authorized to appoint 
three persons, to be known as the State House Construction Com- 
mission, and Messrs. John D. Long, Wm. Endicott, Jr., and Benjamin 
D. Whitcomb were appointed the commissioners. Mr. Whitcomb 
died in 1894, and Mr. Charles Everett Clark was appointed to fill the 
vacancy. The latter died in 1899. 1894 Mr. Long resigned, and 
Mr. George W. Johnson was appointed a member of the commission. 
The architects selected were Messrs. Brigham & Spofford of Boston. 
Subsequently to March, 1892, Mr. Charles Brigham was the sole 
architect of the extension. 

On the twenty-first day of December, 1889, the corner stone of the 
new building was laid by His Excellency Governor Ames with appro- 
priate ceremonies. The removal of the various departments and com- 
missions to the new building was begun in the latter part of 1894. 
The House of Representatives of 1895 convened in the old Representa- 
tives' Chamber on tlie second day of January, and on the following 
day met for the first time in the hall set apart for it in the State House 
extension. It has occupied this hall ever since. Pending changes in 
the State House building, the Senate sat in a room numbered 239, 
240 and 241, in the extension. Its first meeting in this room was on 



150 The State llousf 



February 18, 1895. On April 8 it resumed its sittings in the old Senate- 
Chamber. 

By chapter 124 of the Resolves of 1896, the State House Construction' 
Commission was directed to provide temporary accommodations for 
the Senate of 1897 and its officers. A temporary floor was accordingly 
constructed across the apartment, then unfinished, that has since 
come to be known as Memorial Hall, on a level with the present gallery; 
and the room thus made was finished and furnished as a Senate Cham- 
ber, with accommodations for spectators. On January 6, 1897, the 
Senate met in this chamber, which it continued to occupy throughout 
the session of that year, and it also, for the first time, made use of 
the reading room and the other rooms and offices intended for its 
permanent occupancy. 

By chapter 531 of the Acts of 1896, His Honor Roger Wolcott, 
Acting Governor, Hon. George P. Lawrence, President of the Senate, 
and Hon. George v. L. Meyer, Speaker of the House, were made a 
committee to decide upon a plan for preserving, restoring and render- 
ing practically fire-proof the so-called Bulfinch State House. The 
committee was directed to employ an architect, who was to superintend 
the execution of the work in accordance with such drawings and speci- 
fications as should be approved by said committee. It was provided 
that the State House Construction Commission should have charge 
of the work. Mr. Arthur G. Everett was the architect selected by the 
committee, and with him was associated Mr. Robert D. Andrews. 
Mr. Charles A. Cummings was made consulting architect. 

By chapter 470 of the Acts of 1897, His Excellency Roger Wolcott, 
Hon. George P. Lawrence, President of the Senate, and Hon. John 
L. Bates, Speaker of the House, were made a committee to decide 
upon plans for furnishing the so-called Bulfinch State House, with 
authority to employ an architect to make drawings, specifications 
and designs therefor, and also to superintend the execution of the 
work. Mr. Everett was selected for the purpose. 

On the convening of the General Court of 1898. the Senate occupied 
for the first time the chamber in the Bulfinch building that had formerly 
been the Hall of the House of Representatives. The original Senate 
Chamber was assigned to the Senate by the Governor and Council 
as one of its apartments. The Senate has continued to occupy its 
new chamber ever since. 

For the purpose of meeting the expenses incurred between 1889 
and 1913 in connection with taking of land, including land damages, 
the construction and furnishing of the State House Extension, the 
finishing of the Memorial Hall therein, and the restoring and furnishing 
of the Bulfinch front, etc., bonds to the amount of $7,120,000 were 
issued from time to time. 



The State House. 151 

By chapter 150 of the Resolves of 1912, the State House Commission 
(the Secretary of the Commonwealth, the Treasurer and Receiver- 
General and the Sergeant-at-Arms) was directed, with the co-operation 
ot the State Art Commission, to cause to be prepared plans for altera- 
tions in. and additions to, the State House, and to report to the next 
General Court. Report was made to the General Court of 1913 (House 
Document No. 13S); and, by chapter 830 ot the Acts of that year the 
State House Building Commission, to be appointed by the Governor 
with the advice and consent of the Council, was created, for the purpose 
of constructing additions substantially in accordance with the plan 
recommended in the report. Messrs. .Albert P. Langtry, chairman, 
Joseph B. Russell and Neil McNeil werp appointed the members of the 
building commission. Messrs. Robert D. Andrews, William Chapman 
and R. Clipston Sturgis were the architects selected by the commission. 
The work was begun in August, 1914. In 1915 Mr. John A. Keliher 
succeeded Mr. Langtry as a member of the commission and as its 
chairman, and Mr. J. Edward Fuller succeeded Mr. Russell. 

By chapter 256 of the General Acts of 1915, the Commission was 
directed to construct a forward projection of the West wing, substan- 
tially the same as that already built in connection with the new East 
wing, and provision was made for the purchasing or taking of certain 
property and for the removal of the buildings thereon, etc. To meet 
the expenses connected with the making of these several alterations 
and additions, bonds to the amount of $2,265,000 were authorized 
and issued, as follows: chapter 8.^0 of the Acts of 191.S, $900,000; 
chapter 256 of the Acts of 1915, $600,000; chapter 181 of the Acts 
of 1916, §65,000; and chapter 250 of the Acts of 1916, $700,000. 
By chapter 17 of the General Acts of 1916. taking effect March 2, the 
State House Building Commission was abolished and its powers were 
transferred to the State House Commission. The members of this 
latter commission were Albert P. Langtry (Secretary of the Common- 
wealth), Charles L. Burrill (Treasurer and Receiver-General) and 
Thomad F. Pedrick (Sergeant-at-Arms of the General Court), Chair- 
man; and, under their direction, the work was completed. 

By item 8157-08. section 2, Chapter 711, Acts ot 1956 The State 
Superintendent of Buildings was directed to cause the preparation of 
plans for. and the construction of, an archives building on the grounds 
of the State House. This item appropriated $1,005,000 for the project. 
With Maurice A. and F. Parker Reidy of Boston, engineers in charge, 
and the Boston firm of Perry Shaw, Hepburn and Dean as consulting 
architect, construction was begun July 1, 1958. The Archives Building 
was completed and accepted by the Commonwealth on September 
27, 1960. 



152 



Seal of the Commonwealth. 



SEAL OF THE COMMONWEALTH. 




COUNCIL RECORDS. WEDNESDAY. DECEMBER 13th. 1780. 



Ordered. That Nathan Cushing, Esqr., be a committee to prepare 
a Seal for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, who reported a Device 
for a Seal for said Commonwealth as follows, viz.: Sapphire, an 
Indian, dressed in his Shirt, Moggosins, belted proper, in his right 
hand a Bow, Topaz, in his left an Arrow, its point towards the Base; 
of the second, on the Dexter side of the Indian's head, a Star. Pearl. 
for one of the United States of America. 

CREST. On a Wreath a Dexter Arm clothed and ruffled proper, 
grasping a Broad Sword, the Pummel and Hilt, Topaz, with this 
Motto: Ense petit placidam Sub Libertate Quietem. And around the 
Seal: Sigillum Reipublicas Massachusettensis. 

Advised that the said Report be Accepted as the Arms of the Com- 
monwealth of Massachusetts. 



Arms and Emblems of the Commonwealth. 153 

[Chapter 2 of the General Laws.] 

Arms, Great Seal, Flag, Flower, Tree and Bird of the Commonwealth. 

Section 1 . The arms of the commonwealth shall consist of a shield 
having a blue field or surface with an Indian thereon, dressed in a shirt 
and moccasins, holding in his right hand a bow, and in his left hand an 
arrow, point downward, all of gold; and, in the upper corner of the field, 
above his right arm, a silver star with five points. The crest shall be a 
wreath of blue and gold, whereon, in gold, shall be a right arm, bent at 
the elbow, clothed and ruffled, with the hand grasping a broadsword. 
The motto shall be "Ense petit placidam sub libertate quietem." 

Section 2. The coat-of-arms as drawn and emblazoned under the 
direction of the state secretary in the year eighteen hundred and ninety- 
eight and deposited in his office shall be the official representation of the 
arms of the commonwealth of Massachusetts, and all designs of said 
coat-of-arms for official use shall conform strictly to said representation. 

Section 3. The great seal of the commonwealth shall be circular in 
form, bearing upon its face a representation of the arms of the common- 
wealth encircled with the inscription, "Sigillum Reipublica Massachu- 
settensis." The colors of the arms shall not be an essential part of said 
seal, and an impression from a seal engraved according to said design, 
on any commission, paper or document shall be valid without such colors 
or the representation thereof by heraldic lines or marks. 

Section 4. The seal of the commonwealth now in use in the office 
of the state secretary shall be the authorized seal so long as its use may 
be continued. 

Section 5. The flag of the commonwealth shall bear on one side a 
representation of the arms of the commonwealth, as prescribed by sec- 
tions one and two, upon a white field, and on the other side a blue shield 
bearing a representation of a green pine tree, upon a white field. 

Section 6. The flag of the United States and the flag of the com- 
monwealth shall be displayed on the main or administration building 
of each public institution of the commonwealth. The flags shall be of 
suitable dimensions and shall be flown every day when the weather 
permits. 

Section 7. The mayflower (epigaea repens) shall be the flower or 
floral emblem of the commonwealth. 

Section 8. The American elm (Ulmus americana) shall be the tree 
or tree emblem of the commonwealth. 

Section 9. The chickadee (Penthestes atricapillus) shall be the bird 
or bird emblem of the commonwealth. 



154 Oath or Affirmation of Office. 



OATH OR AFFIRMATION OF OFFICE. 



Under the Constitutions and Laws of the Commonwealth 
and of the United States every person chosen or appointed to 
any office, civil or military, under the government of this Cora 
monwealth, before he enters on the duties of his office, is re- 
quired to take and subscribe the following oath or afiirma- 
tion: — 

The Oath of Office. 

I, (name), do solemnly swear, that I will bear true faith and 
allegiance to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and will 
support the constitution thereof. So help me God. 

I, (name), do solemnly swear and affirm, that 1 will faith- 
fully and impartially discharge and perform all the duties 
incumbent on me as : according to the best of my 

abilities and understanding, agreeably, to the rules and regu- 
lations of the Constitution, and the laws of this Common- 
wealth. So help me God. 

I, (name), do solemnly swear that I will support the Consti- 
tution of the United States. 



Affirmation. 

I, (name), do solemnly affirm, that I will bear true faith and 
allegiance to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and will 
support the Constitution thereof. T'his I do under the pains 
and penalties of perjury. 

I, (name), do solemnly affirm, that I will faithfully and 
impartially discharge and perform all the duties incumbent 
on me as : according to the best of my abilities 

and understanding, agreeably, to the rules and regulations of 
the Constitution, and the laws of this Commonwealth. This 
I do under the pains and penalties of perjury. 

I, (name), do solemnly affirm that I will support the Consti- 
tution of the United States. 



State Library. 155 



STATE LIBRARY OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

Room 341, State House. 



In 1811 the Legislature of Massachusetts made provision for the 
annual exchange of statutes with the several States of the Union, and 
in 1826 it provided that the books and maps which had accumulated in 
the various departments in the State House should be collected and 
arranged in the Land Office under the care of the Land Agent. This 
act marks the formal establishment of the State Library of Massachu- 
setts. In 1849 the custody of the Library was transferred from the 
Land Agent to the Secretary of the State Board of Education. In 1893 
the office of State Librarian was created, and Caleb B. Tillinghast, 
to whose extraordinary knowledge of books the Library owes so much, 
and who had served as acting librarian since 1879, became the first 
encumbent. 

Chapter 380. Acts of 1960, designated the Library as the George 
Fingold Library. On December 22, 1960, the plaque of George Fingold, 
sculptored by George Cooper was unveiled by Mrs. George Fingold, the 
widow of the former Attorney General of the Commonwealth. 

The State Library now contains more than 850,000 books and pam- 
phlets. As it is primarily a reference library for State officers and mem- 
bers of the General Court, it is especially rich in the laws, public docu- 
ments and judicial decisions of the United States, Great Britain and the 
British colonies, and in works of current governmental interest. It 
has a large collection of statute law, and its collection of foreign laws 
is notable. 

It is provided by the General Laws, chapter 6, section 38, that the 
State Library shall be for the use of the Governor, Lieutenant-Gover- 
nor, Council, General Court and such officers of the government and 
other persons as may be permitted to use it. 

Trustees. John E. Powers of Boston (President of the Senate), Chair- 
man; Paul Buck, Cambridge; J. Paul Marini, Quincy; Edward 
Michael Doherty, Beverly; the Speaker of the House of Representa- 
tives, ex officio. 

State Librarian. — Ignatius Albert Matkov. 

Assistant State Librarians. — Anna E. Lima and Allan Fox. 

Legislative Reference Librarian. — Caspar Caso, Jr. 



156 Agricultural Library, etc. 



AGRICULTURAL LIBRARY. 

41 Tremont Street, Room 604, Boston. 



A valuable Agricultural Library, connected with the office of the 
Commissioner of Agriculture, is also open, during the usual business 
hours, for the use of the members of the General Court. 



BOSTON ATHEN^UM. 

10 H Beacon Street. 



By the act of the General Court incorporating the Proprietors of 
the Boston Athena?um, it is provided that the Governor, Lieutenant- 
Governor, the members of the Council, of the Senate, and of the House 
of Representatives, for the time being, shall have free access to the 
Library of the said corporation, and may visit and consult the same at 
all times, under the same regulations as may be provided by the4by- 
laws of said corporation for the proprietors thereof. 

The Boston Athenaeum is near the State House; and members who 
may wish to avail themselves of their privilege can receive a note of 
introduction to the Librarian by applying to the Sergeant-at-Arms. 



MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

1154 BoYLSTON Street, Boston. 



Section 6 of the Act of Feb. 19, 1794, incorporating the Massa- 
chusetts Historical Society, provides that "either branch of the Legis- 
lature shall, and may have free access to the library and museum of 
said Society." 



Legal Holidays and Proclamations. 



157 



LEGAL HOLIDAYS IN MASSACHUSETTS. 

(See General Laws, Chapter 4, Section 7, Eighteenth paragraph, as 
most recently amended by Chapter 616 of the Acts of 1962.) 



New Year's Day 
Washington's Birthday 
Patriots' Day . 
Memorial Day 
Cndependence Day . 
Labor Day 
Columbns Day 
Veterans Day . 
Christmas Day 

And the Day designated by 
customarily the 

In Suffolk County only 



. January the first 

. February the twenty-second 

. April the nineteenth 

May the thirtieth 

July the fourth 

First Monday of September 
. October the twelfth 
. November the eleventh 
. December the twenty-fifth 

■ the Governor as a Day of Thanksgiving, 
fourth Thursday in November. 

{March the seventeenth 
(Acts of 1962, Chapter 616) 
June the seventeenth 
(Acts of 1962. Chapter 616) 



PROCLAMATIONS REQUIRED TO BE ISSUED 
ANNUALLY BY THE GOVERNOR. 



New Orleans Day .... January the eighth 

(Acts of 1938, Chapter 49) 
American History Month . . . Month of February 

(Acts ol 1957. Chapter 44) 
Lincoln Day ..... February the twelfth 
(General Laws. Chapter 6, Section 13) 

Spanish War Memorial Day and Maine 

Memorial Day .... February the fifteenth 
(.\cts of 1927. Chapter 58) 
Washington Day .... February the twenty-second 
(.Acts of 1955, Chapter 265) 



158 Legal Holidays and Proclamations. 

Boston Massacre .... March the fifth 

(Acts of 1932, Chapter 242) 
Peter Francisco Day . . . March the fifteenth 

(Acts of 1954. Chapter 124) 
Evacuation Day .... March the seventeenth 

(Acts of 1938, Chapter 80) 
Student Government Day . . First Friday of April 

(Chapter 650, Acts of 1951, as amended by Chapter 368. Acts of 1959 
and Chapter 138, Acts of 1961) 

Patriots' Day April the nineteenth 

(Acts of 1938, Chapter 22) 
Arbor and Bird Day . . . Last Friday in April 

(Acts of 1946, Chapter 201) 
Loyalty Day ..... May the first 

(Acts of 1949. Cliapter 263) 
Polish Constitution Day . . . May the third 

(Acts of 1953, Chapter 172) 
Mothers' Day ..... Second Sunday in May 

(Acts of 1955, Chapter 265) 
Lafayette Day .... May the twentieth 

(Acts of 1935, Chapter 148) 
Massachusetts Art Week . . . Last Week in May 

(Acts of 1958. Chapter 125) 
Memorial Day .... May the thirtieth 

(Acts of 1953. Chapter 84) 
Teachers' Day .... First Sunday in June 

(Acts of 1960. Chapter 46) 
Children's Day .... Second Sunday in June 

(Acts of 1958. Chapter 81) 

Flag Day June the fourteenth 

(General Laws, Chapter 6, Section 14) 
Bunker Hill Day .... June the seventeenth 

(Acts of 1932, Chapter 153) 
Fathers' Day Third Sunday in June 

(Acts of 1955, Chapter 265) 
Purple Heart Day .... August the seventh 

(Acts of 1955. Chapter 265) 
Indian Day August the twelfth 

(Acts of 1939, Chapter 56) 



Legal Holidays and Proclamations. 159 

Susan B. Anthony Day . . . August the twenty-sixth 

(Acts of 1958, Chapter 265) 
Sight-Saving Month . . . Month of September 

(Acts of 1959, Chapter 358) 
Commodore John Barry Day . . September the thirteenth 

(Acts of 1934. Chapter 191) 
Constitution Day .... September the seventeenth 

(Acts of 1953. Chapter 170) 
Senior Citizen's Day . . . Third Sunday in September 

(Acts of 1957, Chapter 39) 
Employ the Handicapped Week . First Full Week in October 

(Acts of 1958, Chapter 662) 
Fire Prevention Week . . . Date fixed by Fire Marshal 

Piilaski Day October the eleventh 

(Acts of 1932, Chapter 14) 
Columbus Day .... October the twelfth 

(Acts of 1958, Chapter 110) 
United Nations Day . . . October the twenty-fourth 

(Acts of 1955, Chapter 265) 
Youth Honor Day .... October the thirty-first 

(Acts of 1960. Chapter 536) 
Veterans Day .... November the eleventh 

(Acts of 1954, Chapter 661) 
American Education Week . . Usually the week including 

November the eleventh 
(Acts of 1935. Chapter 96) 
Thanksgiving Day .... Customarily the fourth Thurs- 
day in November 
(Proclamation not required by law but customarily issued by the 
Governor) 
Disabled American Veterans' 

Hospital Day .... First Sunday in December 

(Acts of 1955, Chapter 265) 

Civil Rights Week .... December eighth to fifteenth 

(Acts of 1952, Chapter 104) 
Army and Navy Union Day . . Second Saturday in December 

(Acts of 1955, Chapter 265) 
Veteran Firemen's Muster Day , No date specified 

(Acts of 1941, Chapter 387^ 



160 General Court Parking Privileges. 

Chapter 140 of the Acts of 1934. 
An Act providing facilities for the parking of 

MOTOR vehicles NEAR THE STATE HOUSE BY MEM- 
BERS AND OFFICERS OF THE GENERAL COURT. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. The traffic commission of the city of 
Boston is hereby directed to provide in its regulations 
prohibiting or restricting the parking and standing of 
motor vehicles on public ways in said city that they 
shall not, so far as they relate to the easterly side of 
Hancock street between Mount \ ernon and Derne 
streets, the southerly side of Derne street between 
Hancock and Bowdoin streets, and the westerly side of 
Bowdoin street between Mount X^ernon and Beacon 
streets, apply to motor vehicles owned or used by mem- 
bers and officers of the general court. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 

Chapter 183 of the Acts of 1962, 
An Act revising the law relative to parking on 

THE state house GROUNDS. 

Whereas. The deferred operation of this act would tend to 
defeat its purpose, which is to provide forthwith for the es- 
tablishment of rules and regulations relative to the parking 
of motor vehicles on the state house grounds in order to re- 
lieve traffic congestion in the vicinity of the state house, there- 
fore it is hereby declared to be an emergency law, necessary 
for the immediate preservation of the public convenience. 
Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. The parking area on the state house 
grounds, including that portion of Mount Vernon street 
between the westerly curb of Bowdoin street and the 
easterly curb of Hancock street, is hereby designated for 
the use of members of the general court, subject to such 
rules and regulations as the committee on rules of the 
two branches acting concurrently may adopt and for the 
use of such other persons as said committee may by such 
rules and regulations prescribe. Whoever violates any 
such rule or regulation shall be punished by a fine of not 
more than ten dollars for each such violation. The 
capitol police shall enforce said rules and regulations and 
for said purpose may exercise the powers conferred on them 
by section twelve of chapter eight of the General Laws. 

Section 2. Chapter two hundred and eleven of the 
acts of nineteen hundred and fifty-one is hereby repealed, 



DISTRICTS 



CONGRESSIONAL. COUNCILLOR, 
SENATORIAL AND REPRESENTATIVE 



CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICTS. 

[As established by Chapter 315 of the Acts of 1962. See General Law3, 
Chapter 57.] 



The United States census of 1960 was the basis of the apportionment. 



DISTRICT No. 1. 





Popu- 




Popu- 


Cities and Towns. 


lation, 
1960. 


Cities and Towns. 


lation, 
1960. 


Berkshire County. 




Franklin County. 




Adams .... 


12.391 


Ashfield 


1.131 


Alford .... 


256 


Bernardston 






1.370 


Becket .... 


770 


Buckland 






1.664 


Cheshire 


2,472 


Charlemont 








897 


Clarksburg . 


1.741 


Colrain . 








1.426 


Dalton .... 


6.436 


Conway 








875 


Egremont 


895 


Deerfield 








3.338 


Florida .... 


569 


Erving . 








1.272 


Great Barrington 


6,624 


Gill . . 








1,203 


Hancock 


455 


Greenfield 








17.690 


Hinsdale 


1,414 


Hawley 








251 


Lanesborough 


2,933 


Heath . 








304 


Lee .... 


5.271 


Leverett 








914 


Lenox .... 


4.253 


Leyden . 








343 


Monterey 


480 


Monroe 








210 


Mount Washington . 


34 


Montague 








7,836 


New Ashford 


165 


New Salem 








397 


New Marlborough 


1.083 


Northfield 








2.320 


North Adams . 


19,905 


Orange . 








6.154 


Otis . . . . 1 


473 


Rowe 








231 


Peru 




197 


Shelburne 








1,739 


PiTTSFIELD 




57,879 


Shutesbury 








265 


Richmond 




890 


Sunderland 








1.279 


Sandisfield 




536 


Warwick 








426 


Savoy . 




277 


Wendell 








292 


Sheffield 




2.138 


Whately 








1.037 


Stockbridge 




2,161 






Tyringham 




197 






Washington 




290 


Hampden County. 




West Stockbridge 


1.244 


Blandford . 


636 


Williamstown 


7.322 


Chester 


1.155 


Windsor 


• • 1 


384 


Granville 






1 


874 



103 



164 



Congressional Districts. 



DISTRICT No. 1 — Concluded. 



Cities and Towns. 



Popu- 
lation, 
1960. 



Cities and Towns. 



Hampden Co. — Con. 

HOLYOKE 

Montgomery 
Russell . 
Southwick 
Tolland 
Westfield . 

Hampshire County. 
Amherst 
Chesterfield . 
Cummington 
Easthampton 
Goshen 
Hadley . 
Hatfield 
Huntington . 
Middlefield . 
Northampton 



52,689 

333 

1,366 

5.139 

101 

26,302 



13,718 

556 

550 

12,326 

385 

3,099 

2,350 

1,392 

315 

30,058 



Hampshire Co. — Con 

Pelham . 

Plainfield 

Southampton 

Westhampton 

Williamsburg 

Worthington 



Worcester County. 
Athol . 
Petersham 
Phillipston 
Royalston 
Templeton 

Total . 

[Silvio O. Conte.] 



DISTRICT No. 2. 



Hampden County. 


I 


Hampshire County. 




Agawam 


15,718 


Belchertown 


5,186 


Brimfield 


1,414 


Gran by 


4.221 


Chicopee . 


61,553 


South Hadley 


14,956 


East Longmeadow 


10,294 ! 


Ware .... 


7,517 


Hampden 


2,345 ' 






Holland 


561 1 


Worcester County. 




Longmeadow 


10,565 1 


Brookfield . 


1,751 


Ludlow 


13,805 


East Brookfield . 


1,533 


Monson 


6,712 


North Brookfield 


3,616 


Palmer .... 


10,358 


Sturbridge . 


3,604 


Springfield 


174,463 


Warren .... 


3,383 


Wales .... 


659 


W'est Brookfield . 


2,053 


West Springfield . 








Wilbraham . 


7,387 


Total . 
[Edward P. Boland.] 


388,578 



Congressional Districts. 



165 



DISTRICT No. 3. 





Popu- 


Popn- 


Cities and Towns. 


lation, 
1960. 


CiTiEs AND Towns. 


lation, 
19C0. 


Middlesex County. 


: 


Worcester Co. — Con. | 


Acton .... 


7,238 


Douglas 


1 2,559 


Ashby . 




1.883 


Dudley . 






6,510 


Ayer 




14,927 


FiTCHBURG . 






43,021 


Boxborough . 




744 


Gardner 






19.038 


Dunstable . 




824 


Hardwick 




2.340 


Groton . 




3,904 


Harvard 




1 2,563 


Holliston 




6,222 


1 Hopedale 




3,987 


Hudson 




9,666 


Hubbardston 






1.217 


Littleton 




5,109 


Lancaster 






3,958 


Marlborough 




18,819 


1 Leicester 






8,177 


Maynard 




7,695 


1 Leominster 






27,929 


Natick . 




28,831 


Lunenburg . 






6,334 


Pepperell 




4,336 


Mendon 






2,068 


Sherborn 




1,806 


Milford 






15.749 


Shirley . 




5,202 


Millbury 






9,623 


Stow 




2,573 


Millville 






1,567 


Townsend 




3,650 


New Braintree 






509 


Tyngsborough 




1 3.302 


Northbridge 






10,800 


Westford 




6,261 


Oakham 






524 






Oxford. 




'. 1 9.282 






Paxton . 






2,399 


Norfolk County. 


1 


Princeton 






1,360 


Bellingham . 


i 6,774 


Rutland 






3,253 


Franklin 


10,530 


Southbridge 






16,523 


Medway 


5,168 


Spencer 






7,838 


Millis .... 


4,374 


Sterling 
Sutton . 
Upton . 






3,193 
3.638 
3,127 


Worcester County. 




Uxbridge 






7,789 


Ashburnham 


2,758 


1 \\'ebster 






13.680 


Barre . 




3,479 


1 Westminster 






4,022 


Berlin . 




1.742 


j Winchendon 




'. 1 6,237 


Blackstone . 




5,130 










Bolton . 




1 1,264 


Total . 


_ 


441.558 


Charlton 




1 3,685 








Clinton 




12.848 


[Philip J. Philbin 

1 


] 





DISTRICT No. 4. 



Middlesex County. 




Middlesex Co. — Con. 




Ashland 


7.779 


VVayland 


10.444 


Framingham 


44,526 


Weston .... 


8.261 


Hopkinton . 


4,932 






Sudbury 


7.447 


Worcester County. 




Waltham 


55.413 


Auburn 


14.047 


Watertown . 


39,092 


Boylston 


2,367 



166 



Congressional Districts. 

DISTRICT No. A: — Concluded. 



Cities and Towns. 


Popu- 
lation, 
1960. 


Cities and Towns. 


Popu- 
lation. 
1960. 


Worcester Co. — Con. 
Grafton 

Holclen .... 
Northborough 
Shrewsbury . 
Southborough 
Westborough 


10,627 

10.117 

6,687 

16,622 

3,996 

9,599 


Worcester Co. — Con. 
West Boylston 
Worcester . 

Total . 

[Harold D. Donohue.] 


5,526 
186,587 


444,069 



DISTRICT No. 5. 



Essex County. 




Middlesex Co. — Con. 




Andover .... 


15,878 


Lowell .... 


92,107 


Lawrence . . . 


70,933 


Melrose 


29,619 






North Reading . 


8,331 


Middlesex County. 




Reading 


19,259 


:Bedford .... 


10,969 


Stoneham 


17,821 


Billerica 








17,867 


Tewksbury . 


15,902 


Burlington 








12,852 


Wilmington . 


12,475 


Carlisle . 








1,488 


Winchester . 


19,376 


Chelmsford 
Concord 








15,130 
12,517 


WOBURN 


31,214 












Dracut . 








13,674 


Total . 


450,716 


Lexington 








27,691 






Lincoln . 








5,613 


[F. Bradford Morse.] 





DISTRICT No. 6. 



Essex County. 




Essex Co. — Con. 




Amesbury . 


10,787 


Nahant .... 


3,960 


Beverly 






36,108 


Newbury 






2,519 


Boxford 






2,010 


Newburyport 






14,004 


Danvers 






21,926 


North Andover 






10,908 


Essex . 






2,238 


Peabodv 






32,202 


Georgetown . 






3,755 


Rockport 






4.616 


Gloucester 






25,789 


Rowley . 






2,783 


Groveland . 






3,297 


Salem . 






39,211 


Hamilton 






5,488 


Salisbury . 






3,154 


Haverhill. 






46,346 


Swampscott . 






13,294 


Ipswich 






8,544 


Topsfield 






3,351 


Lynn . 






94,478 


Wen ham 






2,798 


Manchester . 
Marblehead . 






3,932 
18,521 


West Newbury 






1.844 










Merrimac 






3,261 


Total . . . 


452.956 


Methuen 






28.114 






Middleton . 






3,718 


[William H. Bates.] 





Congressional Districts, 



167 



DISTRICT No. 7. 





Popu- 




Popu- 


Cities and Towns. 


lation, 


Cities and Towns. 


lation, 




1960. 




1960. 


Essex County. 




Suffolk County. 




Lynnfield 


8,398 


Chelsea 


33.749 


Saugus .... 


20,666 


Revere 


40.080 






Winthrop 


20,303 


Middlesex County. 










Arlington 


49,953 


Total . . . 


392,350 


Belmont 


28,715 






Everett 


43.544 






Malden 


57,676 






Medford . 


64,971 






Wakefield . 


24,295 


[Torbert H. Macdonald.] 





DISTRICT No. 



Middlesex County. 




1 
Suffolk County — 


Con. 




Cambridge . 


107.716 


Boston — Con. 






SOMERVILLE . 


94.697 


Ward 3 . 
i Ward 21 . 




29,240 
36.977 


Norfolk County. 




! Ward 22 . 




32.170 


Brookline 


54.044 














Total . . 




420.596 


Suffolk County. 










Boston: 










Ward 1 . . . 


45,114 








Ward 2 . . . 


20,638 


[Thomas P. O'Neill. Jr.] 





DISTRICT No. 9. 



Suffolk County. 




Suffolk County — 


■Con. 




Boston: 




Boston — Con. 






Ward 4 . . . 


28.524 


Ward 14 . 




47,766 


Ward 5 








36,920 


Ward 15 . 




24.051 


Ward 6 








28,426 


Ward 16 . 




30.689 


Ward 7 








27.689 


Ward 17 . 




30,407 


Ward 8 








20.140 


Ward 19 . 




29.533 


Ward 9 








19.485 


Ward 20 . 




41.590 


Ward 10 








26,595 










Ward 1 1 








25.532 


Total . 




478,962 


Ward 12 








30.744 








Ward 13 






30,871 

1 


[John W. McCorn 


lack.J 





168 



Congressional Districts. 



DISTRICT No. 10. 





Popu- 




Popu- 


Cities A^fD Towns. 


lation, 


Cities and Towns. 


lation, 




1960. 




1960. 


Bristol County. 




t 

Middlesex County. 




Attleboro . 


27,118 


Newton 


92,384 


Berkley 
Dighton 


1,609 
3.769 


Norfolk County. 




Easton 


9,078 


Dover . 






2,846 


Fall River 


99,942 


Foxborough 






10,136 


Freetown 


3,0.39 


Medfield 






6,021 


Mansfield 


7,773 


Needham 






25,793 


North Attleborough . 


14,777 


Norfolk . 






3,471 


Norton .... 


6,818 


Plamville 






3,810 


Raynham 


4,150 


\\ aloole 






14,068 


Rehoboth . 


4,953 


\\ eliesley 






26,071 


Seekonk 


8,399 


\\ estwood 






10.354 


Somerset 
Swansea 
Taunton 


12,196 
9.916 

41,132 


\\ rentham 






6,685 


Total 






456,308 






[Joseph W. Martin, Jr.] 





DISTRICT No. 11. 



Norfolk County. 




Plymouth County. 




Avon .... 


4,301 


Brockton . 


72,813 


Braintree 








31,069 






Canton . 








12,771 






Dedham 








23,869 


Suffolk County. 




Holbrook 








10,104 


Boston, Ward 18 


54,096 


Milton . 
Norwood 








26,375 
24,898 












Total . . . 


441,180 


QUINCY . 








87,409 , 






Randolph 








18,900 




Sharon . 








10,070 






Stoughton 








16,328 






\\'eymouth 








48,177 


, [James A. Burke.] 





DISTRICT No. !■ 



Barnstable County. 




Barnstable Co. — Con. 




Barnstable . 


13,465 


Mashpee 


867 


Bourne . 








14,011 


! Orleans . 






2.342 


Brewster 








1,236 


Provincetown 






3.389 


Chatham 








3,273 


Sandwich 






2,082 


Dennis . 








3,727 


1 Truro . 






1,002 


Eastham 








1,200 


j Wellfleet 






1,404 


Falmouth 








13,037 


Yarmouth . 






5.504 


Harwich 








3.747 







Congressional Districts. 



169 



DISTRICT No. n— Concluded. 





Popu- 




Popu- 


Cities and Towns. 


lation, 


Cities and Towns. 


lation, 




19,0. 




19 0. 


Bristol County 




Plymouth Co. — Con. 




Acushnet 


5,7.55 


East Bridgewater 


6,139 


Dartmouth . 


14,607 


Halifax .... 


1,599 


Fairhaven 


14,339 


Hanover 




5,923 


New Bedford . 


102,477 


Hanson . 




4,370 


Westport 


6,641 


Hingham 
Hull . 




15,378 
7,055 


Dukes County. 




Kingston 


_ 


4.302 


Chilmark . 


238 


Lakeville 




3,209 


Edgartown . 


1,474 


Marion . 




2,881 


Gay Head . 


103 


Marshfield 




6,748 


Gosnold .... 


66 


Mattapoisett . 


3.117 


Oak Bluffs . 


1,419 


Middleborough . 


11,065 


Tisbury 


2,169 


Norwell 


5,207 


West Tisbury 


360 


Pembroke 


4,919 






Plymouth 


14,445 


Nantucket County. 




Plympton 


821 


Nantucket . 


3,559 


Rochester 


1,559 






Rockland 


13,119 


Norfolk County. 




Scituate 


11.214 


Cohasset 


5,840 


Wareham 


9,461 






West Bridgewater 


5,061 


Plymouth County. 




Whitman 


10,485 


Abington 


10,607 








Bridgewater . 


10.276 


Total . 


404,969 


Carver. 


1,949 






Duxbury 


4.727 


[Hastings Keith.] 





Councillor Districts. 171 



COUNCILLOR DISTRICTS. 

(With Councillors for 1963-64.) 

lAs established by Chapter 432, Section 1, of the Acts of 1960, based on 
the State census ot 1955. See General Laws, Chapter 57.] 



I. — The Cape and Plymouth, the First, Second and Third Bristol, and 

the Norfolk and Plymouth Senatorial Districts. 

Barnstable, Bourne, Brewster, Chatham, Dennis, Eastham, Falmouth, 
Harwich, Mashpee, Orleans, Provincetown, Sandwich, Truro, 
Wellfleet and Yarmouth, in the county of Barnstable; Acushnet, 
Attleboro, Berkley, Dartmouth, Dighton, Fairhaven, Fall River, 
Freetown, New Bedford, North Attleborough, Norton, Raynham, 
Rehoboth, Seekonk, Somerset, Swansea, Taunton and Westport, 
in the county of Bristol; Chilmark, Edgartown, Gay Head, Gosnold, 
Oak Bluffs, Tisbury and West Tisbury, in the county of Dukes 
County; Nantucket, in the county of Nantucket; Cohasset, Hol- 
brook and Weymouth, in the county of Norfolk; and Carver, Dux- 
bury, Halifax, Hanover, Hanson, Hingham, Hull, Kingston, 
Lakeville, Marion, Marshfield, Mattapoisett, Middleborough, 
Norwell, Pembroke, Plymouth, Plympton, Rochester, Scituate, 
Wareham and Whitman, in the county of Plymouth. Legal voters, 
314,050. [Ernest C. Stasiun, Fairhaven.] 

II. — The Second Norfolk, the Norfolk and Middlesex, the Norfolk 

and Suffolk, the Plymouth, and the Sixth Suffolk Senatorial 
Districts. 

Easton and Mansfield, in the county of Bristol; Newt.on and Weston, 
in the county cf Middlesex; .Avon, Bellingham, Brookline. Canton, 
Dedham, Dover, Foxborough, Franklin, Medfield, Medway, Millis, 
Needham, Norfolk. Norwood, Plainville, Sharon, Stoughton, Wal- 
pole, Wellesley, Westwood and Wrentham. in the county of Norfolk; 
Abington, Bridgewater, Brockton, East Bridgewater, Rockland 
and West Bridgewater, in the county of Plymouth; and Wards 
Nos. 12, 14, 18 and 22 of Boston, in the county of Suffolk. Legal 
voters, 322.309. [Margaret M. Heckler, Wellesley.] 

III. — The Second and Fifth Middlesex, the Middlesex and Worcester, 
and the Third and Fifth Suffolk Senatorial Districts. 



172 Councillor Districts. 

Acton, Ashland, Ayer, Bedford, Belmont, Boxborough. Wards Nos. 2. 
4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 and 11 of Cambridge, Carlisle, Chelmsford, Con- 
cord, Fraraingham, HoUiston, HopkintOTi, Hudson, Lincoln, Little- 
ton, Marlborough, Maynard, Natick, Sherborn, Shirley, Ward 7 
of Somerville, Stow, Sudbury, Waltham, Watertovvn, VVayland 
and Westford, in the county of Middlesex; Wards Nos. 4, 5, 10, 
11, 19, 20 and 21 of Boston, in the county of Suffolk; and Berlin, 
Bolton, Harvard, Lancaster and Northborough, in the county of 
Worcester. Legal voters, 322,111. [John W. Costello, Boston.] 

IV. — The First Norfolk, and the First, Second, Fourth and Seventh 
Suffolk Senatorial Districts. 

Saugus, in the county of Essex; Ward 1 of Cambridge, and W'ards 1 and 
5 of Everett, in the county of Middlesex; Braintree, Milton, Quincy 
and Randolph, in the county of Norfolk; and Wards 1, 2, 3, 6, 7, 
8, 9, 13. 15, 16 and 17 of Boston, Chelsea, Revere and Winthrop, 
in the county of Suffolk. Legal voters, 306,895. [Patrick J. 
McDonough, Boston.] 

V. — The First, Second, Third, Fourth and Fifth Essex Senatorial 
Districts. 

Amesbury, Andover, Beverly, Boxford, Dan vers, Essex, Georgetown, 
Gloucester, Groveland, Hamilton, Haverhill, Ipswich, Lawrence, 
Lynn, Lynnfield, Manchester, Marblehead, Merrimac, Methuen, 
Middleton, Nahant, Newbury, Newburyport, North Andover, 
Peabody, Rockport, Rowley, Salem, Salisbury, Swampscott, Tops- 
field, Wenham and West Newbury, in the county of Essex; and 
North Reading and Reading, in the county of Middlesex. Legal 
voters, 307,006. [John J. Buckley, Lawrence.] 

VI. — The First, Third, Fourth, Sixth and Seventh Middlesex Sena- 

torial Districts. 

Arlington, Ashby, Billerica, Burlington, Ward 3 of Cambridge, Dracut, 
Dunstable, Wards Nos. 2, 3. 4 and 6 of Everett, Groton, Lexing- 
ton, Lowell, Maiden, Medford, Melrose, Pepperell, Wards Nos. 
1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 of Somerville, Stoneham, Tewksbury, Townsend, 
Tyngsborough, Wakefield, Wilmington, W'inchester and Woburn, 
in the county of Middlesex. Legal voters, 305,043. [Joseph R. 
Crimmins, Somerville.] 

VII. — The First. Second, Third and Fourth Worcester, and the 
Worcester and Hampden Senatorial Districts. 



Councillor Districts. 173 



Brimfield, Hampden, Holland, Monson, Palmer. Wales and Wilbraham, 
in the county of Hampden; Belchertown and Ware, in the county of 
Hampshire; and Ashburnhara, Athol, Auburn, Barre, Blackstone, 
Boylston. Brookfield. Charlton, Clinton, Douglas, Dudley, East 
Brookfield, Fitchburg, Gardner, Grafton, Hardwick, Holden, Hope- 
dale, Hubbardston, Leicester, Leominster, Lunenburg, Mendon, 
Milford, Millbury, Millville, New Braintree, North Brookfield, 
Northbridge, Oakham, Oxford, Paxton, Petersham, Phillipston, 
Princeton, Royalston, Rutland, Shrewsbury, Southborough, South- 
bridge, Spencer, Sterling, Sturbridge, Sutton, Templeton, Upton, 
Uxbridge. Warren, Webster, West Brookfield, West Boylston, 
Westborough, Westminster, Winchendon and Worcester, in the 
county of Worcester. Legal voters, 304,677. [Walter F. Kelly, 
Worcester.] 

Vni. — The Berkshire, the Franklin and Hampshire, the First and 
Second Hampden, and the Hampden and Berkshire Senatorial 
Districts. 

Adams, Alford, Becket, Cheshire, Clarksburg, Dalton, Egremont. 
Florida, Great Barrington, Hancock, Hinsdale, Lanesborough, 
Lee, Lenox, Monterey, Mount Washington, New Ashford, New 
Marlborough, North Adams, Otis, Peru, Pittsfield, Richmond. 
Sandisfield, Savoy, Sheffield, Stockbridge, Tyringham, Washing- 
ton, West Stockbridge, Williamstown and Windsor, in the county 
of Berkshire; Ashfield, Bernardston, Buckland, Charlemont, Col- 
rain, Conway, Deerfield, Erving, Gill, Greenfield, Hawley, Heath, 
Leverett, Leyden, Monroe, Montague, New Salem, Northfield, 
Orange, Rowe, Shelburne, Shutesbury, Sunderland, Warwick, 
Wendell and Whately, in the county of Franklin; Agawam, Bland- 
ford, Chester, Chicopee, East Longmeadow, Granville, Holyoke, 
Longmeadow, Ludlow, Montgomery, Russell, Southwick, Spring- 
field. Tolland, West Springfield and Westfield, in the county of 
Hampden; and Amherst, Chesterfield. Cummington, Easthampton, 
Goshen, Granby, Hadley, Hatfield, Huntington, Middlefield, 
Northampton, Pelham, Plainfield, South Hadley, Southampton, 
Westhampton, Williamsburg and Worthington, in the county of 
Hampshire. Legal voters, 328,494. [Raymond F. Sullivan, 
Springfield.] 



174 Senatorial Districts. 



SENATORIAL DISTRICTS. 

(With Senators for 1963-64.) 

(As established by Chapter 432. Section 2, of the Acts of 1960, based on 
the State census of 1955, See General Laws, Chapter 57.] 



[Average ratio for the State, legal voters, 62,765.] 



Berkshire. — .A.dams, Cheshire, Clarksburg, Dalton, Florida, Han- 
cock, Hinsdale, Lanesborough, Lee, Lenox, New Ashford, North 
Adams, Peru, Pittsfield, Savoy, Washington, Williamstown and 
Windsor. Legal voters, 63,280. [Edmund R. St. John, Jr., Adams.] 

First Bristol. — Attleboro, Berkley, Dighton, North Attleborough, 
Norton, Raynham, Rehoboth, Seekonk, Somerset, Swansea and 
Taunton. Legal voters, 61,645. [John F. Parker, Taunton.] 

Second Bristol. — Acushnet, Fall River and Freetown. Legal 
voters, 62,761. [Mary L, Fonseca, Fall River.] 

Third Bristol. — Dartmouth and New Bedford. Legal voters, 
64,267. [Antone L. Silva, New Bedford.] 

Cape and Plymouth. — Barnstable, Bourne, Brewster, Chatham, 
Dennis, Eastham, Falmouth, Harwich, Mashpee, Orleans, Prov- 
incetown. Sandwich, Truro, Wellfleet and Yarmouth, tn the county 
of Barnstable; Fairhaven and Westport, in the county of Bristol; 
Chilmark, Edgartown, Gay Head, Gosnold, Oak Bluffs, Tisbury 
and West Tisbury, in the county of Dukes County; Nantucket, in 
the county of Nantucket; and Marion, Mattapoisett, Plymouth, 
Rochester and Wareham, m the county of Plymouth. Legal voters, 
62,288. [Allan F. Jones, Barnstable.] 

First Essex. — Lynn, Nahant and Swampscott. Legal voters, 
63.430. [Charles V. Hogan, Lynn.] 

Second Essex. — Beverly, Marblehead, Peabody and Salem. Legal 
voters, 62,858. [Kevin B. Harrington, Salem.] 

Third Essex. — Boxford, Danvers, Essex, Georgetown, Gloucester, 
Groveland, Hamilton, Ipswich, Lynnfield, Manchester, Middleton, 
Newbury, Rockport, Rowley, Topsfield, Wenham and West New- 



Senatorial Districts. 175 

bury, in the county of Essex; and North Reading and Reading, in 
the comity of Middlesex. Legal voters, 61,640. [Philip A. Graham, 
Hamilton.] 

Fourth Essex. — Amesbury, Andover, Haverhill, Merrimac, New- 
buryport, North Andover and Salisbury. Legal voters, 60,368. 
[James P. Rurak, Haverhill.] 

Fifth Essex. — Lawrence and Methuen. Legal voters, 58,710. 
[William X. Wall, Lawrence.] 

Franklin and Hampshire. — Ashfield. Bernardston, Buckland, 
Charlemont. Colrain, Conway, Deerfield, Erving, Gill, Green- 
field, Hawley, Heath. Leverett, Leyden. Monroe, Montague, 
New Salem, Northfield, Orange, Rowe, Shelburne. Shutesbury, 
Sunderland, Warwick, Wendell and Whately, in the county of 
Franklin; and Amherst, Chesterfield, Cummington, Easthampton, 
Goshen, Granby, Hadley, Hatfield. Huntington, Northampton, 
Pelham, Plainfield, South Hadley, Southampton, Westhampton 
and Williamsburg, in the county of Hampshire. Legal voters, 
67,662. [Charles A. Bishee, Jr., Chesterfield.] 

First Hampden. — Ludlow and Wards Nos. 2, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8 of 
Springfield. Legal voters, 68,053. [Stanley J. Zarod, Indian 
Orchard.] 

Second Hampden. — Chicopee, Holyoke and Ward No. 1 of Spring- 
field. Legal voters, 64,996. [Maurice A. Donahue, Holyoke.] 

Hampden and Berkshire. — Alford, Becket, Egremont, Great Bar- 
rington, Monterey, Mount Washington, New Marlborough, Otis, 
Richmond, Sandisfield, Sheffield, Stockbridge, Tyringham and 
West Stockbridge, m the county of Berkshire; Agawam, Blandford, 
Chester, East Longmeadow, Granville, Longmeadow, Montgom- 
ery, Russell, Southwick, Ward No. 3 of Springfield, Tolland, West 
Springfield and Westfield, in the county of Hampden; and Middle- 
field and Worthington, in the county of Hampshire. Legal voters, 
64.503. [George D. Hammond, Westfield.] 

First Middlesex. — Ashby, Dracut, Dunstable, Groton, Lowell, 
Pepperell, Townsend and Tyngsborough. Legal voters, 64,400. 
[John E. Hzirrington, Jr., Lowell.] 

Second Middlesex. — Belmont, Wards Nos. 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 and 11 
of Cambridge and Ward 7 of Somerville. Legal voters, 55,703. 
[Francis X. McCann, Cambridge.] 



176 Senatorial Districts. 

Third Middlesex. — Ward No. 3 of Cambridge. Ward No. 2 of 

Maiden, Wards Nos. 1 and 7 of Medford and Wards Nos. 1, 2. 

3, 4, 5 and 6 of Somerville. Legal voters, 60,316. [Denis L. 

McKenna, Somerville.] 
Fourth Middlesex. — Wards Nos. 2, 3, 4 and 6 of Everett, Wards 

Nos. 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8 of Maiden and Melrose. Legal voters, 

65,735. [Fred Lamson, Maiden.] 

Fifth Middlesex. — Ayer, Bedford, Carlisle, Chelmsford, Concord, 
Lincoln, Littleton, Shirley, Waltham, Watertown and Westford. 
Legal voters, 62,598. [William E. Hays, Waltham.] 

Sixth Middlesex. — Arlington, Wards Nos. 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 of Med- 
ford and Winchester. Legal voters, 60,859. [Philibert L. Pelle- 
grini, Arlington.] 

Seventh Middlesex. — Billerica, Burlington, Lexington, Stoneham, 
Tewksbury, Wakefield, Wilmington and Woburn. Legal voters, 
66,515. [James J. Long, Woburn.] 

Middlesex and Worcester. — Acton, Ashland, Boxborough, Fra- 
mingham, Holliston, Hopkinton, Hudson, Marlborough, Maynard, 
Natick, Sherborn, Stow, Sudbury and Wayland, in the county of 
Middlesex; Berlin, Bolton, Harvard, Lancaster and Northborough, 
in the county of Worcester. Legal voters, 65,318. [Charles W. 
Olson, Ashland.] 

First Norfolk. — Braintree, Quincy and Randolph. Legal voters, 
61,681. [James S. McCormack, Quincy.] 

Second Norfolk. — Easton and Mansfield, in the county of Bristol; 
and Bellingham, Canton, Dover, Foxborough, Franklin, Medfield, 
Medway, Millis, Norfolk, Norwood, Plainville, Sharon, Walpole, 
Westwood and Wrentham, in the county of Norfolk. Legal voters, 
64,024. [George A. Sullivan, Jr., Norwood.] 

Norfolk and Middlesex. — Wards Nos. 2, 3. 4, 5 and 8 of Newton 
and Weston, in the county of Middlesex; and Dedham, Needham 
and Wellesley, in the county of Norfolk. Legal voters, 67,246. 
[Leslie B. Cutler, Needham.] 

Norfolk and Plymouth. — Cohasset, Holbrook and Weymouth, in 
the county of Norfolk; and Carver, Duxbury, Halifax, Hanover, 
Hanson, Hingham, Hull, Kingston, Lakeville, Marshfield, Middle- 
borough, Norwell, Pembroke, Plympton, Scituate and Whitman, 
in the county of Plymouth. Legal voters, 63,089. [Newland H. 
Holmes. Weymouth.] 



Senatorial Districts. 177 



Norfolk and Suffolk. — Wards Nos. 1, 6 and 7 of Newton, in the 
county of Middlesex; Brookline, in the county of Norfolk; and Ward 
No. 22 of Boston, in the county of Suffolk. Legal voters, 65,567. 
[Michael J. Galvin, Newton.] 

Plymouth. — Avon and Stoughton, in the county of Norfolk; and 
Abington, Bridgewater, Brockton, East Bridgewater, Rockland 
and West Bridgewater, in the county of Plymouth. Legal voters, 
61,645. [James F. Burke, Brockton.] 

First Suffolk. — Saugus, in the county of Essex; Wards Nos. 1 and 5 
of Everett, in the county of Middlesex; and Chelsea, Revere and 
Winthrop, in the county of Suffolk. Legal voters, 60,143. [Harry 
Delia Russo, Revere.] 

Second Suffolk. — Ward No. 1 of Cambridge, in the county of Mid- 
dlesex; and Wards Nos. 1, 2 and 3 of Boston, in the county of 
Suffolk. Legal voters, 58,456. [Mario Umana, East Boston.] 

Third Suffolk. — Ward No. 2 of Cambridge, in the county of Middle- 
sex; and Wards Nos. 4, 5 and 21 of Boston, in the county of Suffolk. 
Legal voters, 64,165. [Oliver F. Ames, Boston.] 

Fourth Suffolk. — Wards Nos. 6, 7, 8, 9 and 13 of Boston. Legal 
voters, 53,957. [John E. Powers, Boston.] 

Fifth Suffolk. — Wards Nos, 10, 11, 19 and 20 of Boston. Legal 
voters, 67,163. [James W. Hennigan, Jr., Boston.] 

Sixth Suffolk. — Wards Nos. 12, 14 and 18 of Boston. Legal voters, 
67,713. [A. Frank Foster, Boston.] 

Seventh Suffolk. — Milton, in the county of NorfoU; and Wards 
Nos. 15, 16 and 17 of Boston, in the county of Suffolk. Legal voters, 
63,154. [George V. Kenneally, Jr., Boston.] 

First Worcester. — Leicester, Millbury and Wards Nos. 4, 5, 6, 7 
and 8 of Worcester. Legal voters, 54.908. [William D. Fleming, 
Worcester.] 

Second Worcester. — Holden, West Boylston and Wards Nos. 1, 
2, 3, 9 and 10 of Worcester. Legal voters, 60,436. [John J. Conte, 
Worcester.] 

Third Worcester. — Ashburnham, Boylston, Clinton, Fitchburg, 
Gardner, Leominster, Lunenburg, Sterling and Westminster. 
Legal voters, 61,913. [Joseph D. Ward, Fitchburg.] 



178 Senatorial Districts, 



FoiniTH Worcester. — Auburn, Blackstone, Douglas, Dudley, Graf- 
ton, Hopedale, Mendon, Milford, Millville, Northbridge, Oxford, 
Shrewsbury, Southborough, Sutton, Upton, Uxbridge, Webster 
and Westborough. Legal voters, 65,468. [Joseph F. Gibney, 
Webster.] 

Worcester and Hampden. — Brimfield, Hampden, Holland, Mon- 
son. Palmer, Wales and Wilbraham, in the county of Hampden; 
Belchertown and Ware, in the county of Hampshire; and Athol, 
Barre, Brookfield, Charlton. East Brookfield, Hardwick. Hubbard- 
ston, New Braintree, North Brookfield, Oakham, Paxton, Peter- 
sham, Phillipston, Princeton, Royalston, Rutland, Southbridge, 
Spencer, Sturbridge, Templeton, Warren, West Brookfield and 
Winchendon, tn the county of Worcester. Legal voters, 61,952. 
I Paul H. Benoit, Southbridge.] 



Representative Districts. 179 



REPRESENTATIVE DISTRICTS.* 

[A3 established under authority of Chapter 182 of the Acts of 1947. 
See General Laws, Chapter 57.] 



This table was furnished by the Secretary of the Commonwealth. 



Average ratio for Representatives: legal voters, 9,667. 



BARNSTABLE COUNTY. 
Two Representatives. 
District 

1. — Barnstable, Bourne, Falmouth, Mashpee and Sandwich. Legal 

voters, 11,112; population, 21,784. One representative. 

2. — Brewster, Chatham, Dennis, Eastham, Harwich, Orleans, Prov- 

incetown, Truro, Wellfieet and Yarmouth. Legal voters, 
10,785; population, 16,432. One representative. 

BERKSHIRE COUNTY. 
Seven Representatives. 
District 

1. — North Adams. Legal voters, 11,137; population, 22,230. One 

representative. 

2. — Adams, Clarksburg, Florida, New Ashford, Savoy and Williams- 

town. Legal voters, 10,648; population, 19,542. One repre- 
sentative. 

3. — Cheshire, Lanesborough and Pittsfield, 1st Ward and 2d Ward. 

Legal voters, 9,660; population, 18,865. One representative. 

4. — Pittsfield. 3d Ward, 4th Ward and 5th Ward. Legal voters, 

11,454; population, 21,794. One representative. 

5. — Hancock, Pittsfield, 6th Ward and 7th Ward. Legal voters, 

7,734; population, 16.524. One representative. 

6. — Becket. Dalton, Hinsdale, Lee, Lenox, Otis. Peru, Tyringham, 

Washington and Windsor. Legal voters, 8,883; population, 
14,843. One representative. 

* The State census of 1945 was the basis of the apportionment. 



180 Representative Districts. 

District 
7. — Alford, Egremont, Great Barrington, Monterey, Mount Wash- 
ington, New Marlborough, Richmond, Sandisfield, Sheffield, 
Stockbridge and West Stockbridge. Legal voters, 8,195; 
population, 13,822. One representative. 

BRISTOL COUNTY. 
Eighteen Representatives. 
District 

1. — Attleboro and North Attleborough. Legal voters, 17,458; 

population, 33,927. Two representatives. 

2. — Easton, Mansfield, Norton and Raynham. Legal voters, 9,973; 

population, 18,011. One representative. 

3. — Taunton, 5th Ward, 7th Ward and 8th Ward. Legal voters 

8,613; population, 18,520. One representative. 

4. — Taunton, 1st Ward, 2d Ward, 3d Ward and 4th Ward. Legal 

voters, 8,270; population, 16,255. One representative. 

5. — Berkley, Dighton, Freetown, Rehoboth, Seekonk, Swansea and 

Taunton, 6th Ward. Legal voters, 11,343; population, 23,720. 
One representative. 

6. — New Bedford, 1st Ward and 2d Ward. Legal voters, 18,261; 

population, 37,286. Two representatives. 

7. — New Bedford, 3d Ward. 4th Ward and 5th Ward. Legal voters, 

27,296; population, 55,545. Two representatives. 

8. — New Bedford, 6th Ward. Legal voters, 8,071; population, 

17,477. One representative. 

9. — Acushnet, Dartmouth and Fairhaven. Legal voters, 12,050; 

population, 26,253. One representative. 

10. — Fall River, 1st Ward, 2d Ward and 3d Ward. Legal voters, 

20,844; population, 49,169. Two representatives. 

11. — Fall River, 4th Ward, 5th Ward, 6th Ward and 7th Ward. 

Legal voters, 17,886; population, 39,881. Two representatives. 

12. — Fall River, 8th Ward, and Westport. Legal voters, 9,186; 

population, 17,291. One representative. 

13. — Fall River, 9th Ward, and Somerset. Legal voters, 9,709; 

population, 20,284. One representative. 

DUKES COUNTY. 
One Representative. 
District 
1. — Chilmark, Edgartown, Gay Head, Gosnold, Oak Bluffs, Tis- 
bury and West Tisbury. Legal voters, 3,345; population, 
5,050. One representative. 



Representative Districts. 181 



ESSEX COUNTY. 

twexty-nine representatives. 
District 

1. — Newburyport and Salisbury. Legal voters, 9.978; population, 

16,701. One representative. 

2. — Araesbury, Essex, Georgetown and Gloucester, 6th Ward, 7th 

Ward and 8th Ward. Ipswich, Newbur^', Rowley and West 
Newbury. Legal voters, 18.631; population. 34.058. Two 
representatives. 

3. — Groveland, Haverhill. 2d Ward. 4th Ward. 6th Ward and 7th 

Ward and Merrimac. Legal voters, 18.308; population, 
32,272. Two representatives. 

4. — Haverhill, 1st Ward, 3d Ward and 5th Ward. Legal voters, 

9,132; population, 18,424. One representative. 

5. — Andover, Lawrence, 1st Ward, Methuen, 1st Precinct, 2d Pre- 

cinct, 4th Precinct and 5th Precinct and North Andover. 
Legal voters, 28,803; population, 50,953. Three representa- 
tives. 

6. — Lawrence, 2d Ward and 6th Ward and Methuen, 3d Precinct. 

Legal voters, 20,288; population, 37,898. Two representa- 
tives. 

7. — Lawrence. 3d Ward and 4th Ward. Legal voters, 9.486; popu- 

lation, 21,130. One representative. 

8. — Lawrence, 5th Ward. Legal voters, 9,720; population, 18,638. 

One representative. 

9. — Boxlord, Danvers, Middleton and Topsfield. Legal voters, 

8,892; population, 18,993 One representative. 

10. — Peabody, 2d Ward. 3d Ward, 4th Ward, 5th Ward and 6th 

Ward and Salem, 2d Ward, 4th Ward and 6th Ward. Legal 
voters, 18,896; population, 36,785. Two representatives. 

11. — Lynn, 1st Ward and 7th Ward, Lynnfield. Peabody. 1st Ward 

and Saugus. Legal voters. 19,331; population, 36,336. Two 
representatives. 

12. — Lynn, 5th Ward and 6th Ward. Legal voters. 20,301; popula- 

tion, 42.851. Two representatives. 

13. — Lynn, 2d Ward, 3d Ward and 4th Ward and Nahant. Legal 

voters. 27,430; population, 52,199. Three representatives. 

14. — Marblehead, Salem. 1st Ward, 3d Ward and 5th Ward and 

Swampscott. Legal voters. 28,498; population. 48,448. Three 
representatives. 

15. — Beverly. Hamilton, Manchester and Wenham. Legal voters, 

18,550; population, 33.146. Two representatives. 



182 Representative Districts. 

District 

16. — Gloucester. 1st Ward, 2d Ward, 3d Ward, 4th Ward and 5th 

Ward and Rockport. Legal voters, 10,016; population, 

20,493. One representative. 



FRANKLIN COUNTY. 
Three Representatives. 
District 

1. — Ashfield, Bemardston, Buckland, Charlemont, Colrain, Conway, 

Deerfield, Hawley, Heath, Leverett, Leyden, Monroe, North- 
field, Rowe, Shelburne, Sunderland and Whately. Legal 
voters, 9,138; population, 17.135. One representative. 

2. — Greenfield. Legal voters. 10,421; population, 17,020. One 

representative. 

3. — Erving, Gill, Montague, New Salem, Orange, Shutesbury, 

Warwick and Wendell. Legal voters, 9,242; population, 
16,911. One representative. 



HAMPDEN COUNTY. 
Nineteen Representatives. 
District 

1. — Brimfield. East Longmeadow, Hampden, Holland, Longmeadow, 

Monson, Palmer, Wales and Wilbraham. Legal voters, 
16.459; population. 31,783. Two representatives. 

2. — Chicopee, 5th Ward and 6th Ward and Ludlow. Legal voters, 

9,152; population. 18.249. One representative. 

3. — Chicopee, 7th Ward, 8th Ward and 9th Ward. Legal voters, 

7,837; population, 15,873. One representative. 

4. — Chicopee, 1st Ward, 2d Ward, 3d Ward and 4th Ward. Legal 

voters, 9,839; population, 18.569. One representative. 

5. — Springfield, 2d Ward and 8th Ward. Legal voters, 21,151; 

population, 43.497. Two representatives. 

6. — Springfield, 3d Ward and 4th Ward. Legal voters, 23,138; 

population, 44,831. Two representatives. 

7. — Springfield. 5th Ward. Legal voters, 8,263; population, 14,448. 

One representative. 

8. — Springfield, 6th Ward. Legal voters, 10,099; population. 17.492. 

One representative. 



Representative Districts. 183 

District 
9. — Springfield. 7th Ward. Legal voters, 10.253; population, 17,834. 
One representative. 

10. — Springfield. 1st Ward. Legal voters, 9.058; population, 21,794. 

One representative. 

11. — Agawam, Blandford, Chester, Granville, Montgomery, Russell, 

Southwick, Tolland and West Springfield. Legal voters, 
10.266; population, 33,656. Two representatives. 

12. — Holyoke, 1st Ward, 2d Ward and 4th Ward. Legal voters, 

10,607; population. 20.602. One representative. 

13. — Holyoke. 3d Ward and 6th Ward. Legal voters, 10.555; popula- 

tion, 18,146. One representative. 

14. — Holyoke, 5th Ward and 7th Ward. Legal voters, 9,905; popu- 

lation, 15.027. One representative. 

15. — Westfield. Legal voters, 10.384; population, 19,956. One repre- 

sentative. 

HAMPSHIRE COUNTY. 
Four Representatives. 
District 

1. — Northampton, 1st Ward, 2d Ward, 3d Ward. 4th Ward and 

5th Ward. Legal voters, 10,249; population, 18.883. One 
representative. 

2. — Chesterfield, Cummington. Goshen, Hatfield, Huntington, 

Middlefield, Northampton, 6th Ward and 7th Ward, Plain- 
field, Southampton, Westhampton, Williamsburg and Worth- 
ington. Legal voters, 7,629; population, 14,865. One repre- 
sentative. 

3. — Easthampton. Hadley and South Hadley. Legal voters, 10.966; 

population, 20.536. One representative. 

4. — Amherst. Belchertown. Granby, Pelham and Ware. Legal 

voters. 10.527; population, 20,091. One representative. 



MIDDLESEX COUNTY. 
FiFTY-Fotm Representatives. 
District 
1. — Cambridge, 1st Ward, 2d Ward and 3d Ward, and Somerville, 
2d Ward. Legal voters, 22,190; population, 54,217. Two 
representatives. 



184 Represejitative Districts. 

District 

2. — Cambridge. 4th Ward, 5th Ward, 6th Ward, 7th Ward and 8th 

Ward. Legal voters, 26,543; population, 48,523. Three 
representatives. 

3. — Cambridge, 9th Ward, 10th Ward and 11th Ward and Water- 

town, 1st Precinct and 2d Precinct. Legal voters, 17,894; 
population, 36,472. Two representatives. 

4. — Newton, 1st Ward, 2d Ward, 3d Ward and 7th Ward. Legal 

voters, 20,538; population, 38,819. Two representatives. 

5. — Newton, 4th Ward, 5th Ward and 6th Ward. Legal voters, 

21,504; population, 38.438. Two representatives. 

6. — Natick. Legal voters, 8,268; population, 15,789. One repre- 

sentative. 

7. — Waltham, 1st Ward, 2d Ward, 4th Ward and 6th Ward and 

Weston. Legal voters, 18,123; population, 35,603. Two 
representatives. 

8. — Ashland, p-ramingham, Holliston, Hopkinton and Sherborn. 

Legal voters, 17,963; population, 35,625. Two representatives. 

9. — Marlborough. Legal voters, 8,921; population, 15,680. One 

representative. 

10. — Hudson, Lincoln, Sudbury and Wayland. Legal voters, 8,452; 

population, 16,076. One representative. 

11. — Acton, Chelmsford, Tyngsborough and Westford. Legal voters, 

8,947; population, 16,905. One representative. 

12. — Ashby, Ayer, Boxborough, Dunstable, Groton, Littleton 

Pepperell, Shirley and Townsend. Legal voters, 9,185, 
population, 18,259. One representative. 

13. — Carlisle, Concord, Maynard and Stow. Legal voters, 8,944; 

population, 17,433. One representative. 
14. — Lowell, 3d Ward. 6th Ward, 7th Ward and 8th Ward. Legal 
voters, 19,377; population, 38.480. Two representatives. 

15. — Lowell. 1st Ward, 2d Ward, 4th Ward, 5th Ward, 9th Ward, 

10th Ward and 11th Ward. Legal voters, 30,071; popula- 
tion, 62.749. Three representatives. 

16. — Maiden, 2d Ward and 3d Ward. Legal voters, 8,309; popula- 

tion, 14,978. One representative. 

17. — Waltham, 3d Ward 5th Ward and 7th Ward and Watertown, 
8th Precinct and 10th Precinct. Legal voters, 9.247; popula- 
tion, 20,063. One representative. 

18. — North Reading, Reading, Wilmington and Woburn, 2d Ward, 
3d Ward. 4th Ward, 5th Ward, 6th Ward and 7th Ward. 
Legal voters, 20,018; population, 37,807. Two representa- 
tives. 



Representative Districts. 185 



District 

19. — Bedford. Billerica, Burlington, Dracut, Lexington and Tewks- 

bury. Legal voters, 19,071; population. 43,165. Two repre- 
sentatives. 

20. — Everett, 2d Ward, 3d Ward, 4th Ward and 6th Ward. Legal 

voters, 20,136; population, 40,245. Two representatives. 

21. — Maiden, 1st Ward, 4th Ward. 5th Ward. 6th Ward and 7th 

Ward. Legal voters, 22,833; population. 44,58Q. Two 
representatives. 

22. — Melrose. Stoneham and Wakefield. Legal voters, 32.329; popu- 

lation. 58.680. Three representatives. 

23. — Belmont and Watertown, 3d Precinct and 9th Precinct. Legal 

voters, 19,590; population, 35,159. Two representatives. 

24. — Everett. 1st Ward, Somerville, 1st Ward, 3d Ward, 4th V\ ard 

and 5th Ward. Legal voters. 30,321; population, 64.513. 
Three representatives. 

25. — Arlington, 1st Precinct, 3d Precinct and 5th Precinct and 

Somerville. 6th Ward and 7th Ward. Legal voters. 18.250; 
population. 34,840. Two representatives. 

26. — Medford, 2d Ward, 3d Ward, 4th Ward, 5th W^ard and 6th 

Ward. Legal voters, 27,692; population. 53.974. Three 
representatives. 

27. — Everett. 5th Ward and Medford. 1st Ward and 7th Ward. 

Legal voters. 9.008; population. 18.045. One representative. 

28. — Arlington, 2d Precinct. 4th Precinct. 6th Precinct. 7th Precinct. 

8th Precinct. 9th Precinct. 10th Precinct. 11th Precinct, 12th 
Precinct, 13th Precinct and 14th Precinct. Legal voters, 
18,853; population. 35.346. Two representatives. 

29. — Winchester and Woburn 1st Ward. Legal voters, 10,217; 

population, 18,359. One representative. 

30. — Watertown, 4th Precinct, 5th Precinct, 6th Precinct and 7th 

Precinct. Legal voters, 7,427; population, 13.500. One 
representative. 



NANTUCKET COUNTY. 
One Representative. 
District 
1. — Nantucket. Legal voters. 1.881; population. 2.870. One 
representative. 



186 Representative Districts. 



NORFOLK COUNTY.* 

Nineteen Representatives. 
District 

1. — Quincy, 3d Ward. 4th Ward, 5th Ward and 6th Ward. Legal 

voters, 27,969; population, 53,581. Three representatives. 

2. — Quincy, 1st Ward. Legal voters, 8,744; population, 17,430. 

One representative. 

3. — Braintree, Quincy, 2d Ward and Weymouth. Legal voters, 

29,477; population, 59,309. Three representatives. 

4. — Holbrook, Milton and Randolph. Legal voters, 19,366; popu- 

lation, 33,897. Two representatives. 

5. — Avon, Sharon and Stoughton. Legal voters, 8,276; population, 

15,669. One representative. 

6. — Canton, Dedham and Needham. Legal voters, 21,114; popu- 

lation, 37,870, Two representatives. 

7. — Dover, Norwood, Wellesley and Westwood. Legal voters, 

21,709; population, 40,452. Two representatives. 

8. — Bellingham, Medfield, Medway, Millis and Walpole. Legal 

voters, 10,467; population, 21,794. One representative. 

9. — Foxborough, Franklin, Norfolk, Plainville and Wrentham. 

Legal voters, 10,656; population, 22,928. One representative. 
10. — Brookline. Legal voters, 31,440; population, 56,940. Three 
representatives. 



PLYMOUTH COUNTY.t 

Ten Representatives. 
District 

1. — Carver, Halifax, Kingston, Plymouth and Plympton. Legal 

voters, 9,929; population, 19,383. One representative. 

2. — Duxbury, Hanover, Marshfield, Pembroke and Scituate. Legal 

voters, 9.185; population, 14.549. One representative. 

3. — Cohasset.t Hingham, Hull and Norwell. Legal voters, 11,038; 

population, 18,751. One representative. 

4. — Abington, Hanson and Rockland. Legal voters, 9,543; popu- 

lation, 17,618. One representative. 

♦Excluding the town of Cohasset, which is included in districts of 
Plymouth County. 

tincluding the town of Cohasset in Norfolk County. 



Representative Districts. 



187 



District 

5. — Bridgewater, East Bridgewater, West Bridgewater and Whitman. 

Legal voters, 11.976; population, 24,544. One representative. 

6. — Lakeville. Marion, Mattapoisett, Middleborough, Rochester 

and Wareham. Legal voters, 12,917; population, 23,811. 
One representative. 

7. — Brockton, 3d Ward and 4th Ward. Legal voters, 9,681; popu- 

lation, 16,942. One representative. 

8. — Brockton, 1st Ward, 2d Ward and Sth Ward. Legal voters, 

15,204; population, 27,526. Two representatives. 

9. — Brockton, 6th Ward and 7th Ward. Legal voters, 10,840; 

population, 20,734. One representative. 



SUFFOLK COUNTY. 

Forty-six Representatives. 
District 

1. — Boston, 1st Ward. Legal voters, 22,712; population, 55,112. 

Two representatives. 

2. — Boston, 2d Ward. Legal voters, 12,783; population, 25,655 

One representative. 

3. — Boston, 3d Ward. Legal voters, 19.547; population, 45,446. 

Two representatives. 

4. — Boston, 4th Ward. Legal voters, 16,880; population, 30,901. 

Two representatives. 

5. — Boston, Sth Ward. Legal voters, 19,010; population, 32,962. 

Two representatives. 

6. — Boston, 6th Ward. Legal voters, 12,285; population, 24,986. 

One representative. 

7. — Boston, 7th Ward. Legal voters, 17,101; population, 34,405. 

Two representatives. 

8. — Boston, Sth Ward. Legal voters, 11.480; population, 28,675. 

One representative. 

9. — Boston, 9th Ward. Legal voters, 13,299; population. 28,204. 

One representative. 

10. — Boston, 10th Ward and 11th Ward. Legal voters, 37,074; 

population, 60,200. Three representatives. 

11. — Boston, 12th Ward. Legal voters, 19,679; population, 36,955. 

Two representatives. 
12. — Boston, 13th Ward. Legal voters, 14,412; population, 28,329. 

One representative. 
13. — Boston, 14th Ward. Legal voters, 27,960; population, 54,145. 

Three representatives. 



188 Representative Districts. 

District 

14. — Boston, 15th Ward. Legal voters, 14,352; population, 27,586. 

One representative. 

15. — Boston, 16th Ward. Legal voters, 18, 80S; population, 33,875. 

Two representatives. 
16. — Boston, 17th Ward. Legal voters. 19,344; population, 33,774. 

Two representatives. 
17. — Boston, 18th Ward. Legal voters, 23,745; population, 45.104. 

Three representatives. 

18. — Boston, 19th Ward. Legal voters, 17.876; population, 30,47^. 

Two representatives. 

19. — Boston, 20th Ward. Legal voters, 23.116; population, 37.8^0. 

Three representatives. 

20. — Boston. 21st Ward. Legal voters. 24,105; population, 38,476. 

Three representatives. 

21. — Boston, 22d Ward. Legal voters, 17,884; population, 33,257. 

Two representatives. 

22. — Chelsea. 1st Ward and 3d Ward. Legal voters, 8,362; popula- 

tion. 16,242. One representative. 

23. — Chelsea, 2d Ward, 4th Ward and 5th Ward. Legal voters, 

12,505; population, 23,698. One representative. 

24. — Revere. Legal voters, 17,673; population, 35,687. Two repre- 

sentatives. 

25. — Winthrop. Legal voters, 10,076; population, 18,696. One 

representative. 

WORCESTER COUNTY. 

Twenty-seven Representatives. 
District 

1. — Athol, Royalston and Winchendon. Legal voters, 9,081; popu- 

lation, 19,015. One representative. 

2. — Ashburnham, Fitchburg, 3d Ward, Hubbardston, Petersham, 

Phillipston, Princeton, Templeton and Westminster. Legal 
voters, 8,434; population, 17,947. One representative. 

3. — Barre, Hardwick, Holden, New Braintree, North Brookfield, 

Oakham, Paxton and Rutland. Legal voters, 8,801; popu- 
lation, 16,811. One representative. 

4. — Brookfield, East Brookfield. Spencer. Sturbridge, Warren and 

West Brookfield. Legal voters. 8.910; population, 16,509. 
One representative. 

5. — Southbridge. Legal voters, 9,746; population, 17,561. One 

representative. 



Representative Districts. 189 



District 

6. — Dudley and Webster. Legal voters, 9,720; population, 18,259. 

One representative. 

7. — Auburn. Charlton, Leicester and Oxford. Legal voters, 10,421; 

population, 21,092. One representative. 

8. — Blackstone, Douglas, Hopedale, Mendon, Millbury, Millville, 

Northbridge, Sutton and Uxbridge. Legal voters, 22,206; 
population, 40,576. Two representatives. 

9. — Grafton. Milford, Shrewsbury, Southborough, Upton and West- 

borough. Legal voters, 20,768; population, 44,449. Two 
representatives. 

10. — Gardner. Legal voters, 9,597; population, 20,245. One 

representative. 

11. — Berlin, Bolton. Boylston, Clinton, Harvard, Lancaster, Leom- 

inster, 3d Ward, Lunenburg, Northborough, Sterling and 
West Boylston. Legal voters, 18,188; population, 34,647. 
Two representatives. 
12. — Leominster, 1st Ward, 2d Ward, 4th Ward and 5th Ward. 
Legal voters, 9,545; population, 18,916. One representative. 

13. — Fitchburg, 1st Ward and 2d Ward. Legal voters, 9,207; popu- 

lation, 20,057. One representative. 

14. — Fitchburg, 4th Ward, 5th Ward and 6th Ward. Legal voters. 

8,664; population, 17,782. One representative. 

15. — Worcester, 1st Ward. Legal voters, 11,031; population, 18,224, 

One representative. 

16. — Worcester, 2d Ward. Legal voters, 10.532; population, 21,664. 

One representative. 

17. — Worcester, 3d Ward. Legal voters, 10,017; population, 25,754. 

One representative. 

18. — Worcester, 4th Ward. Legal voters, 11,759; population, 26,520. 

One representative. 
19. — Worcester, 5th Ward. Legal voters, 9,033; population, 20,496. 
One representative. 

20. — Worcester. 6th Ward. Legal voters, 9,813; population, 18,072. 

One representative. 

21. — Worcester, 7th Ward. Legal voters, 10,524; population, 18,272. 

One representative. 

22. — Worcester, 8th Ward. Legal voters, 7,544; population, 14,654. 

One representative. 

23. — Worcester, 9th Ward. Legal voters, 10,474; population, 18,607. 

One representative. 

24. — Worcester, 10th Ward. Legal voters, 10,091; population, 16,478. 

One representative. 



190 



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VALUATION, 
POPULATION 

and 
VOTERS 



VALUATION OF THE COMMONWEALTH. 



[Established by Chapter 559 of the Acts of 1945.*1 



BARNSTABLE COUNTY. 



Cities and Towns 



Property 



Tax of 
$1,000. 



Barnstable 


$28,978,980 


$4 18 


Bourne . 












10,944,806 


1 58 


Brewster 












2,357,135 


34 


Chatham 












7.944,594 


1 15 


Dennis . 












4,922,252 


71 


Eastham 












1.594,532 


23 


Falmouth 












24.765.020 


3 57 


Harwich 












8,612,531 


1 24 


Mashpee 












1,044,419 


15 


Orleans . 












4,997,518 


72 


Provincetown 












7.343,047 


1 06 


Sandwich 












3.189,064 


46 


Truro 












1,802.515 


26 


Wei meet 












2,357.135 


34 


Yarmouth 












7,163,768 


1 03 


Totals 












$118,017,316 


$17 02 



BERKSHIRE COUNTY. 



Adams ...... 


$13,013,716 


$1 88 


Alford 


367,936 


05 


Becket 


987.076 


14 


Cheshire 


1.418.354 


20 


Clarksburg 


996,753 


14 



* Under the provisions of Section 9 of Chapter 58 of the General 
Laws (Tercentenary Edition), as amended by chapter 112 of the Acts 
of 1941, the Tax Commissioner is required to report to the General 
Court, in the year 1943 and in every second year thereafter, a basis of 
apportionment of State and county taxes. The present apportionment 
was established by Chapter 559 of the Acts of 1945, to constitute a 
basis of apportionment for the years 1946 to 1950, inclusive, or until 
another is made and enacted by the General Court. 



210 Valuation of the Commonwealth. 

BERKSHIRE COUNTY — Concluded. 



Cities and Towns 




Tax of 
$1,000. 



Dalton . 

Egremont 

Florida . 

Great Harrington 

Hancock 

Hinsdale 

Lanesborough . 

Lee 

Lenox 

Monterey 

Mount Washington 

New Asliford . 

New Marlborough 

North Adams 

Otis 

Peru 

PiTTSFIELD 

Richmond 

Sandisfield 

Savoy 

Sheffield 

Stockbridge 

Tyringhara 

Washington 

West Stockbridge 

Williamstown . 

Windsor 

Totals 



$7,895,650 


$1 14 


1,109,240 


16 


1.582,506 


23 


9,871,900 


1 42 


538,698 


08 


1,047,374 


15 


1,607,506 


23 


5,734,825 


83 


4,999,940 


72 


970,585 


14 


207,982 


03 


138,655 


02 


1,605.345 


23 


24,144,671 


3 48 


765,104 


11 


317,936 


05 


69,889,174 


10 08 


843,047 


12 


762,602 


11 


260,762 


04 


1,871,842 


27 


5,088,589 


73 


531,662 


08 


235,762 


03 


1,579,183 


23 


7,955,430 


1 15 


528,698 


08 


$168,868,503 


$24 35 



BRISTOL COUNTY. 



Acushnet ..... 


$3,751,180 


$0 54 


Attleboro 












33,208.469 


4 79 


Berkley . 












1,062,998 


15 


Dartmouth 












14,210,270 


2 05 


Dighton . 












3.813,012 


55 


Easton . 












5,942,996 


86 


Fairhaven 












12,445.006 


1 80 


Fall River 












123,706,694 


17 84 


Freetown 












1,733,187 


25 


Mansfield 












9,253.948 


1 33 


New Bedford 










127.244.377 


18 35 


North Attleborough 








12.071,962 


1 74 


Norton . 








2,703,772 


39 



Valuation of the Commonwealth. 

BRISTOL COUNTY — Concluded. 



Cities and Towns 




211 



Tax of 
$1,000. 



Raynham 






$2,149,152 


$0 31 


Rehoboth 






3.203,043 


46 


Seekonk . 






6.746,576 


97 


Somerset 






15.818.775 


2 28 


Swansea 






4,991.579 


72 


Taunton 






40,436.468 


5 83 


Westport 






6.564.528 


95 


Totals 


• 




$431,057,992 


$62 16 



DUKES COUNTY. 



Chilmark 
Edgartown 
Gay Head 
Gosiiold . 
Oak Bluflfs 
Tisbury , 
West Tisbury 

Totals 



$843,047 


$0 12 


5,378,180 


78 


210,762 


03 


1,371,744 


20 


5,270,307 


76 


6,325.956 


91 


831.930 


12 


$20,231,926 


$2 92 



ESSEX COUNTY. 



Amesbury 

Andover 

Beverly 

Boxford . 

Danvers 

Essex 

Georgetown 

Gloucester 

Groveland 

Hamilton 

Haverhill 

Ipswich . 

Lawrence 

Lynn 

Lynnfield 

Manchester 

Marblehead 

Merrimac 



$9,990,650 
20,955.953 
42,971.059 

1.317,222 
15.472,011 

1.802,515 

2,149,152 
39,620,271 

1,714,765 

6,215,676 
56,080,188 

8,149,158 
103,336,936 
151,194.710 

5,809,086 
10,560.807 
25,286,828 

2,173,238 



$1 44 



3 


02 


6 


20 




19 


2 


23 




26 




31 


5 


72 




25 




90 


8 


09 


1 


18 


14 91 


21 


81 




84 


1 


52 


3 


65 




31 



212 Valuation of the Commonwealth. 

ESSEX COUNTY — Concluded. 



Cities and Towns 



Property 



Tax o. 
$1,000. 



Methuen 

Middleton 

Nahant . 

Newbury 

Newburyport 

North Andover 

Peabody 

Rockport 

Rowley . 

Salem 

Salisbury 

Saugus . 

Swampscott 

Topsfield 

Wenham 

West Newbury 

Totals 



$22,711,929 


$3 28 


2,433,023 


35 


5,722,850 


83 


2,565,117 


37 


13,489,930 


1 95 


9,386,690 


1 35 


28,494,861 


4 11 


6,476,555 


93 


1,802,515 


26 


63,120,514 


9 10 


3,395,562 


49 


17.446,731 


2 52 


26,905,763 


3 88 


3,189,064 


46 


4,475,995 


65 


1,582,506 


23 


$717,999,330 


$103 59 



FRANKLIN COUNTY. 



Ashfield 


$1,525,205 


$0 22 


Bernardston 












1,103,808 


16 


Buckland 












3,196,995 


46 


Charlemont 












1,006,563 


15 


Colrain . 












1,754.249 


25 


Conway . 












1,060.526 


15 


Deerfield 












4,644.942 


67 


Erving . 












2,512,889 


36 


Gill 












1,086,099 


16 


Greenfield 












33,341,806 


4 81 


Hawley . 












274,349 


04 


Heath . 












471,523 


07 


Leverett 












541,100 


08 


Leyden . 












342,936 


05 


Monroe . 












1,109,240 


16 


Montague 












11,368,189 


1 64 


New Salem 












367,936 


05 


Northfield 












2,119,591 


31 


Orange . 












4,991,579 


72 


Rowe . 












762,602 


11 


Shelburne 












3,716,047 


54 


Shutesbury 












421,523 


06 


Sunderland 












1,571,744 


23 


Warwick 












421,523 


06 



Valuation of the Commonwealth. 

FRANKLIN COUNTY — Concluded. 



213 



Cities and Towns 



Property 



Tax of 
$1,000. 



Wendell 
Whately 



Totals 



$353,673 
1,455,877 



$81,522,514 



$0 05 
21 



$11 77 



HAMPDEN COUNTY. 



Agawam 

Blandford 

Brimfield 

Chester . 

Chicopee 

East Longmeadow 

Granville 

Hampden 

Holland . 

HOLYOKE 

Longmeadow . 
Ludlow . 
Monson . 
Montgomery . 
Palmer . 
Russell . 
Southwick 
Springfield , 
Tolland . 
Wales 

West Springfield 
Westfield 
Wilbraham 

Totals 



$10,672,450 


$1 54 


950,221 


14 


1,178.567 


17 


1,471,145 


21 


46.975,058 


6 78 


6,776,216 


98 


2,224,766 


32 


1.057,396 


15 


277.310 


04 


90,616.710 


13 07 


19,996,004 


2 88 


9,056.188 


1 31 


3.882,339 


56 


317.936 


05 


9,439.266 


1 36 


4,474.928 


65 


2,565.117 


37 


286.363.486 


41 31 


475,110 


07 


419,594 


06 


31,054,868 


4 48 


23.678,418 


3 42 


3,674,357 


53 


$557,597,450 


$80 45 



HAMPSHIRE COUNTY. 



Amherst 

Belchertown 

Chesterfield 

Cumniington 

Easthampton 

Goshen . 



$11,633,775 

1,955,792 

683,203 

623,947 

12.609,011 

446,523 



$1 68 
28 
10 
09 
1 82 
06 



214 Valuation of the Commonwealth. 

HAMPSHIRE COUNTY — Concluded. 



Cities and Towns 



Property 



Tax of 
$1,000 



Granby ...... 


$1,109,240 


$0 16 


Hadley . 










3,266.435 


47 


Hatfield . 










3,268.335 


47 


Huntington 










1.180,256 


17 


Middlefield . 










367,936 


05 


Northampton 










30.592,298 


4 41 


Pelham . 










740.046 


11 


Plainfield 










367.936 


05 


South Hadley . 










10.540,021 


1 52 


Southampton . 










1.274.519 


18 


Ware 










7,463.536 


1 08 


Westhampton . 










415,965 


06 


Williamsburg . 










1.605,991 


23 


Worthington . 










843,047 


12 


Totals . 










$90,987,812 


$13 11 



MIDDLESEX COUNTY. 



Acton ...... 


$4,470,756 


$0 65 


Arlington 










63.327.779 


9 13 


Ashby . 










1.386.550 


20 


Ashland . 










3.258.392 


47 


Ayer 










4.243,255 


61 


Bedford . 










3,171.805 


46 


Belmont 










57,954,895 


8 36 


Blllerica . 










9.859.433 


1 42 


Boxborough 










415,965 


06 


Burlington 










2,639.902 


38 


Cambridge 










188.515.872 


27 19 


Carlisle . 










1.268.157 


18 


Chelmsford 










8.916.746 


1 29 


Concord 










13.803,606 


1 99 


Dracut . 










4.991.579 


72 


Dunstable 










485,292 


07 


Everett 










88,165,414 


12 72 


Framingham 










40,078,973 


5 78 


Groton . 










4.991.579 


72 


HoUiston 










4.226,969 


61 


Hopkinton 










3,727,396 


54 


Hudson . 










8,143,059 


1 17 


Lexington 










26,354.606 


3 80 


Lincoln . 










4.847.518 


70 


Littleton 










3,267.821 


47 


Lowell 










108.160,927 


15 60 



Valuation of the Commonwealth. 

MIDDLESEX COU'^TY — Concluded. 



215 



Cities and Towns 




Tax of 
$1,000. 



Malden 

Marlborough 

Maynard 

Medford 

Melrose 

Natick . 

Newton 

North Reading 

Pepperell 

Reading . 

Sherborn 

Shirley . 

Somerville 

Stoneham 

Stow 

Sudbury 

Tewksbury 

Tovvnsend 

Tyngsborough 

Wakefield 

Waltham 

Watertown 

Wayland 

Westford 

Weston . 

Wilmington 

Winchester 

WOBURN 

Totals 



$77,119,332 


$11 12 


17,268.288 


2 49 


7,905.617 


1 14 


86.696,291 


12 51 


43,827,859 


6 32 


22,482,880 


3 24 


181,961,300 


26 25 


3,050.409 


44 


3,327.719 


48 


19,856,099 


2 86 


3,466,374 


50 


2.556.218 


37 


122,784,622 


17 71 


16,420,347 


2 37 


1.525.205 


22 


4,203.275 


61 


4.991.579 


72 


2.703.772 


39 


1.582.506 


23 


24,960,810 


3 60 


62.078.958 


8 95 


59.318,707 


8 56 


6,332,763 


91 


4.809.930 


69 


12.634,820 


1 82 


4,651.106 


67 


37.874,919 


5 46 


23,747.647 


3 43 


$1,520,813,598 


$219 35 



NANTUCKET COUNTY. 



Nantucket 


$14,507,782 


$2 09 


Totals 


$14,507,782 


$2 09 



NORFOLK COUNTY. 



Avon 

Bellingham 

Braintree 



$2,118,339 

3.050,409 

31.968,400 



$0 31 

44 
4 61 



216 Valtmtion of the Commonwealth. 

NORFOLK COUNTY — Concluded. 



Cities and Towns 




Tax of 
$1,000. 



Brookline 

Canton . 

Cohasset 

Dedham 

Dover 

Foxborough 

Ffankirn 

Holbrook 

Medfield 

Med way 

Millis . 

Milton . 

Needham 

Norfolk . 

Norwood 

Plainville 

QUINCY . 

Randolph 
Sharon . 
Stoughton 
Walpole . 
Wellesley 
Westwood 
Weymouth 
Wrentham 

Totals 



$164,949,098 


$23 79 


10.101,349 


1 46 


11.063,194 


1 60 


29.105,423 


4 20 


6.325.116 


91 


7.539.747 


1 09 


9,688,968 


1 40 


3,792,488 


55 


3,304,925 


48 


3,674.357 


53 


3,466.374 


SO 


44.725.770 


6 45 


30,261.434 


4 37 


1,687,042 


24 


30.838,574 


4 45 


1,941.170 


28 


145.077.833 


20 93 


8.432.118 


1 22 


6,648,006 


96 


10.505.378 


1 52 


19.489,960 


2 81 


49,542.385 


7 15 


8.630,467 


1 24 


57,187,043 


8 25 


4,622.368 


67 


j $709,737,735 


$102 41 



PLYMOUTH COUNTY. 



Abin^ton . ... 


$6,429,134 


$0 93 


Bridgewater . 










7,349,734 


1 06 


Brockton 










78.054.984 


11 26 


Carver . 










3.119.737 


45 


Duxbury 










8,430.467 


1 22 


East Bridgewater 










5,568,815 


80 


Halifax . 










1,663,860 


24 


Hanover 










5,358,206 


77 


Hanson . 










3,050,409 


44 


Hingham 










18,999,428 


2 74 


Hull 










17,900,393 


2 58 


Kingston 










5,121,176 


74 


Lakeville 










1,793,268 


26 


Marion . 










5,797.739 


84 


Marshfield 






8,955,577 


1 29 



Valuation of the Commonwealth. 

PLYMOUTH COUNTY — Concluded. 



217 



Cities and Towns 



Property 



Tax of 
$1,000. 



Mattapoisett . 

Middleborough 

Norwell . 

Pembroke 

Plymouth 

Plympton 

Rochester 

Rockland 

Scituate . 

Wareham 

West Bridgewater 

Whitman 

Totals 



$4,115,233 


$0 59 


10,206,055 


1 47 


2.639,902 


38 


3,466,374 


50 


25,422.539 


3 67 


893,047 


13 


1,686,093 


24 


10,285.241 


1 48 


14,731,793 


2 13 


16,371,443 


2 36 


4,004,472 


58 


9,125,439 


1 32 


$280,540,558 


$40 47 



SUFFOLK COUNTY. 



Boston 

Chelsea ..... 

Revere 

Winthrop 


$1,437,779,078 
46,411.609 
42,040,213 
26.644,419 


$207 39 
6 70 
6 06 
3 84 


Totals 


$1,552,905,319 


$223 99 



WORCESTER COUNTY. 



Ashburnham ..... 


$1,983,466 


$0 29 


Athol . 












14.785,913 


2 13 


Auburn . 












8.186.929 


1 18 


Barre 












3.478.189 


50 


Berlin . 












1.369.021 


20 


Blackstone 












2.773,100 


40 


Bolton . 












1.247,895 


18 


Boylston 












1.078.808 


16 


Brookfield 












1.538,216 


22 


Charlton 












2.297,156 


33 


Clinton . 












12,420,644 


1 79 


Douglas . 












2.560,496 


37 


Dudley . 












4,093,701 


59 


East Brookfield 










1,178,567 


17 


Fitchburg 










55,481,773 


8 00 



218 Valuation of the Commonwealth. 

WORCESTER COUNTY — Concluded. 



Cities and Towns 



Property 



Tax of 
$1,000. 



Gardner 

Grafton . 

Hardwick 

Harvard 

Holden . 

Hopedale 

Hubbardston 

Lancaster 

Leicester 

Leominster 

Lunenburg 

Mendon . 

Milford . 

Millbury 

Millville 

New Braintree 

North Brookfield 

Northborough 

Northbridge 

Oakham 

Oxford . 

Paxton . 

Petersham 

Phillipston 

Princeton 

Royalston 

Rutland , 

Shrewsbury 

Southborough 

Southbridge 

Spencer . 

Sterling . 

Sturbridge 

Sutton . 

Templeton 

Upton 

Uxbridge 

Warren . 

Webster . 

West Boylston 

West Brookfield 

Westborough . 

Westminster . 

Winchendon . 

Worcester 

Totals 



$24,570,073 


$3 54 


4.991.579 


72 


1.897.123 


27 


2,639,902 


38 


4.382.143 


63 


7,531.331 


1 09 


896.634 


13 


2.739,902 


40 


3.972.932 


57 


27,876,040 


4 02 


2,703,772 


39 


1.632,181 


24 


17,208.868 


2 48 


6.958,795 


1 00 


1,056.221 


15 


693,275 


10 


2,936.362 


42 


2,429.536 


35 


11,544,631 


1 67 


525.110 


08 


3,777.676 


55 


1.285.983 


19 


1,594.532 


23 


415.965 


06 


1.386.550 


20 


843.047 


12 


1.663,860 


24 


11.137,803 


1 61 


3.813.012 


55 


16.988.677 


2 45 


4,991.579 


72 


2,439,789 


35 


2,593.217 


37 


2.315.889 


33 


3.546,386 


51 


1.666,378 


24 


8,693,293 


1 25 


3,327,719 


48 


12,576,893 


1 81 


3.050,409 


44 


1.602.158 


23 


4,991.579 


72 


2,111.204 


30 


6.123,623 


88 


321,362,930 


46 35 


$667,960,444 


$96 32 



Valuation of the Commonwealth. 

RECAPITULATION. 



219 



Counties 



Property 



Tax of 
$1,000. 



Barnstable 


1 $118,017,316 


$17 02 


Berkshire 










168.868.503 


24 35 


Bristol . 










431.057.992 


62 16 


Dukes . 










20.231,926 


2 92 


Essex . 










717,999.830 


103 59 


Franklin 










81,522,514 


11 77 


Hampden 










557.597.450 


80 45 


Hampshire 










90.987.812 


13 11 


Middlesex 










1.520.813.598 


219 35 


Nantucket 










14.507,782 


2 09 


Norfolk 










709,737.735 


102 41 


Plymouth 










280.540.558 


40 47 


Suffolk 










1,552.905,319 


223 99 


Worcester 










667.960.444 


96 32 


Totals 


$6,932,748,779 


$1,000 00 



220 Population of Cities in the Commonwealth. 

POPULATION OF 
CITIES IN THE COMMONWEALTH, 

WITH THE DATES OF THEIR INCORPORATION. 



NAME 



Incorpo- 
rated 
AS City 



Popu- 
lation, 
1950 

(U. S. 
Census) 



Popu- 
lation, 
1955 

(State 
Census) 



Popu- 
lation, 
1960 

(U. S. 
Census) 



Boston 

Worcester 

Springfield 

Cambridge 

New Bedford 

Fall River 

Somerville 

Lynn 

Newton 

Lowell 

Quincy 

Brockton 

Lawrence 

Medford 

Chicopee 

Pittsfield 

Maiden 

Waltham 

Holyoke 

Haverhill 

Everett 

Fitchburg 

Taunton 

Revere 

Salem 

Beverly 

Chelsea 

Peabody 

Woburn 

Northampton 

Melrose 

Leominster 

Attleboro 

Westfield 

Gloucester 

North Adams 

Gardner 

Marlborough 

Newburyport 



Feb. 23, 
Feb. 29. 
Apr. 12. 
Mar. 17, 
Mar. 9, 
Apr. 12. 
Apr. 14. 
Apr. 10, 
Jun. 2. 
Apr. 1. 
May 17, 
Apr. 9. 
Mar. 21. 
May 31, 
Apr. 18. 
Jun. 5. 
Mar. 31, 
Jun. 2. 
Apr. 7. 
Mar. 10. 
Jun. 11. 
Mar. 8. 
May 11, 
Jun. 19, 
Mar. 23, 
Mar. 23. 
Mar. 13. 
May 8, 
May 18. 
Jun. 23. 
Mar. 18, 
May 13, 
Jun. 17. 
Apr. 9. 
Apr. 28. 
Mar. 22. 
Feb. 28. 
May 23. 
May 24, 



1822 


801.444 


1848 


203,486 


1852 


162,399 


1846 


120.740 


1847 


109.189 


1854 


111,963 


1872 


102,351 


1850 


99,738 


1873 


81,994 


1836 


97.249 


1888 


83.835 


1881 


62,860 


1853 


80,536 


1892 


66,113 


1890 


49,211 


1889 


53,348 


1881 


59.804 


1884 


47.186 


1873 


54.661 


1869 


47.280 


1892 


45.992 


1872 


42,691 


1864 


40.109 


1914 


36,763 


1836 


41,880 


1894 


28,884 


1857 


38,912 


1916 


22.645 


1888 


20,492 


1883 


29,063 


1899 


26.988 


1915 


24.075 


1914 


23.809 


1920 


20,962 


1873 


25,167 


1895 


21.567 


1923 


19,581 


1890 


15.756 


1851 


14,111 



724,702 
202,612 
166,052 
98.958 
105,488 
105,195 
97,032 
99,020 
86,535 
93,876 
84,495 
62,628 
76,094 
65,393 
49,071 
55,290 
59,497 
50,115 
53,213 
45,436 
45,077 
42,925 
41.281 
39,565 
40,117 
31,432 
36,826 
26,682 
25,856 
26,271 
29,239 
24,787 
24,870 
22,046 
25,966 
21,493 
20,108 
16,892 
14,549 



697,197 
186.587 
174.463 
107.716 
102,477 
99.942 
94,697 
94,478 
92,384 
92.107 
87,409 
72.813 
70.933 
64.971 
61.553 
57,879 
57,676 
55.413 
52.689 
46,346 
43,544 
43.021 
41.132 
40,080 
39,211 
36.108 
33.749 
32.202 
31.214 
30,058 
29,619 
27,929 
27,118 
26,302 
25.789 
19,905 
19,038 
18,819 
14.004 



Population and Voters. 



221 



POPULATION AND VOTERS. 



Counties, Cities and Towns in the Commonwealth, with the 
Census of Inhabitants in 1955 and 1960, and a List of Reg- 
istered Voters in 1960, the Figures being for the State 
Election, Revised and corrected by the Secretary of the 
Commonwealth. 





Population 










Regis- 


COUNTIES. CITIES 


State 
Census 


U.S. 
Census 


tered 


AND TOWNS 


Voters 
1962 




1955 


1960 


1 
Barnstable. I 






Barnstable 


. 1 12,051 


13.465 


7,932 


Bourne . 








4,881 


14.011 


3.025 


Brewster 










1,172 


1.236 


928 


Chatham 










3.116 


3.273 


2.240 


Dennis . 










3,322 


3.727 


2.938 


Eastham 










1.107 


1.200 


892 


Falmouth 










9.592 


13.037 


6,556 


Harwich , 










3.367 


3,747 


2,696 


Mashpee 










524 


867 


457 


Orleans . 










2.201 


2,342 


1,698 


Provincetown 










3,415 


3.389 


2,503 


Sandwich 










1,642 


2.082 


1.208 


Truro 










851 


1,002 


544 


Wellfleet 










1,331 


1,404 


873 


Yarmouth 










4,156 


5,504 


3.765 


Totals .... 


52,728 


70.286 


38.255 


Berkshire. 








Adams ..... 


12.789 


12,391 


6.917 


Alford . 








252 


256 


144 


Becket . 






1 777 


770 


422 


Cheshire 






' 2,188 


2,472 


1,255 


Clarksburg 








1.602 


1.741 


941 


Dalton . 








5.574 


6,436 


3,325 


Egremont 








851 


895 


581 


Florida . 








537 


569 


305 


Great Barrington 








6.930 


6,624 


3,506 


Hancock 








463 


455 


241 


Hinsdale 






j 1,451 


1,414 


737 



222 



Population and Voters. 



COUNTIES, CITIES 
AND TOWNS 



Population 



State 

Census 

1955 



U.S. 

Census 

1960 



Regis- 
tered 

Voters 
1962 



Berkshire 
Lanesborough . 
Lee 
Lenox 
Monterey 

Mount Washington 
New Ashford . 
New Marlborough 
North Adams 
Otis 
Peru 

PiTTSFIELD 

Richmond 
Sandisfield 
Savoy 
Sheffield . 
Stockbridge 
Tyringham 
Washington 
West Stockbridge 
WiUiamstown . 
Windsor . 

Totals 

Bristol 
Acushnet 
Attleboro 
Berkley . 
Dartmouth 
Dighton . 
Easton . 
Fair haven 
Fall River 
Freetown 
Mansfield 
New Bedford 
North Attleborough 
Norton . 
Raynham 
Rehoboth 
Seekonk . 
Somerset 
Swansea . 
Taunton 
Westport 

Totals 



— Con. 



2,681 

5.155 

3,592 

450 

42 

155 

1,051 

21,493 

491 

172 

55,290 

837 

571 

312 

2,110 

2,292 

231 

301 

1.192 

5,911 

376 



138,119 



4,892 

24,870 
1,372 

13,077 
3,315 
7,324 

13,376 

105,195 

2,573 

7,708 

105,488 

13.069 
5,160 
3,307 
4,211 
7,290 

10,646 
9,043 

41,281 
6.343 



389,540 



2.933 

5,271 

4,253 

480 

34 

165 

1,083 

19.905 

473 

197 

57,879 

890 

536 

277 

2,138 

2,161 

197 

290 

1,244 

7.322 

384 



142.135 



5.755 

27,118 
1,609 

14,607 
3,769 
9,078 

14,339 

99,942 

3.039 

7,773 

102,477 

14,777 
6.818 
4,150 
4,953 
8,399 

12,196 
9916 

41,132 
6,641 



398.488 



1,431 

2,877 

2,195 

317 

40 

85 

510 

10,255 

293 

112 

29,482 

515 

319 

181 

1,092 

1,517 

126 

153 

700 

3,365 

191 

74,130 



2,984 

12,939 
879 
8,118 
1,902 
5,097 
7,763 

52,960 
1,659 
4,219 

54,755 
7,362 
3,022 
2,331 
2,433 
4,347 
7,051 
5,469 

20,150 
3.882 

209,332 



Population and Voters. 



223 





Population 








! 


Regis- 


COUNTIES. CITIES 




TT C 1 


tered 


AND TOWNS 


State 


^' ^• 


Voters 




Census 


Census I 


1962 




1955 


1960 




Dukes County. 








Chilmark .... 


242 


238 


187 


Edgartown 










1,518 


1,474 


911 


Gay Head 










125 


103 


84 


Gosnold . 










100 


66 


61 


Oak Bluffs 










1,564 


1.419 


902 


Tisbury . 










2,163 


2,169 


1.312 


West Tisbury 










357 


360 


239 


Totals .... 


6,069 


5,829 


3,696 


Essex. 








Amesbury .... 


11.189 


10,787 


5,904 


Andover . 










14,535 


15,878 


9,726 


Beverly 










31,432 


36,108 


18,705 


Boxford . 










1,177 


2,010 


1,302 


Danvers . 










18.185 


21,926 


11,905 


Essex 










2,031 


2,238 


1,324 


Georgetown 










2.821 


3,755 


2,204 


Gloucester 










25,966 


25.789 


13,802 


Groveland 










2,643 


3.297 


1,854 


Hamilton 










4,116 


5,488 


2,932 


Haverhill 










45,436 


46,346 


23.969 


Ipswich . 










7,841 


8.544 


4,824 


Lavvrexce 










76,094 


70.933 


38,539 


Lynn 










99,020 


94,478 


51,853 


Lynnfield 










5,667 


8,398 


4.750 


Manchester 










3.376 


3,932 


2.352 


Marblehead 










15.908 


18,521 


11,312 


Merrimac 










2,980 


3,261 


1,896 


Methuen 










26,437 


28,114 


16,014 


Middleton 










3.370 


3,718 


1,630 


Nahant . 










3.231 


3,960 


2,029 


Newbury 










2,281 


2.519 


1,744 


Newburvport 








14,549 


14.004 


7,860 


North .Andover 








9.362 


10.908 


6,367 


Peabody 








26.682 


32.202 


19,168 


Rockport 










4.633 


4,616 


3,116 


Rowley . 










2.007 


2,783 


1,411 


Salem . 










40.117 


39,211 


22,066 


Salisbury 










2,807 


3,154 


2.156 


Saugus 










18,489 


20,666 


10,843 


Swampscott 










13,070 


13,294 


7,995 


Topsfield 










2,208 


3,351 


1,930 


Wenham 










2.245 


2,798 


1,474 


West Newbury 








1.621 


1,844 


1,026 


Totals 










543.526 


568.831 


315,802 



224 



Population and Voters. 





Population I 










Regis- 


COUNTIES, CITIES 


State 

Census 

1955 


U.S. 

Census 

1960 


tered 


AND TOWNS 


Voters 
1962 


Franklin. 






1 


Ashfield 


1,072 


1.131 


580 


Bernardston 








1,277 


1.370 


700 


Buckland 








1,669 


1.664 


924 


Charlemont 








857 


897 


482 


Colrain . 








1.511 


1,426 


768 


Conway 










888 


875 


497 


Deerfield 










3.111 


3,338 


1,861 


Erving 










1,385 


1,272 


691 


Gill 










1,125 


1.203 


615 


Greenfielc 










18,059 


17,690 


9,573 


Hawley 










281 


251 


123 


Heath 










327 


304 


172 


Leverett 










845 


914 


410 


Ley den 










335 


343 


174 


Monroe 










176 


210 


98 


Montague 








8,428 


7,836 


4,770 


New Salem 








439 


397 


241 


Northfield 








2,337 


2.320 


1,321 


Orange . 








6,161 


6.154 


3,154 


Rowe 








207 


231 


155 


Shelburne 








1,752 


1,739 


991 


Shutesbury 








240 


265 


146 


Sunderland 








1,270 


1.279 


622 


Warwick 








476 


426 


250 


Wendell . 








339 


292 


174 


Whately . 








1,006 


1,037 


540 


Totals 


55,573 


54,864 


30,032 


Hampde> 


J, 












Agawam 








13,177 


15.718 


8,027 


Blandford 








705 


636 


442 


Brimfield 








1,393 


1.414 


726 


Chester . 








1,323 


1.155 


651 


Chicopee 








49,071 


61.553 


27.051 


East Longmeadow 








7.857 


10.294 


5,510 


Granville 








824 


874 


493 


Hampden 








1,756 


2.345 


1,273 


Holland . 








552 


561 


362 


HOLVOKE 








53,213 


52.689 


27,901 


Longmeadow . 








8,482 


10,565 


6,286 


Ludlow . 








10,530 


13,805 


7,059 


Monson . 








6,619 


6.712 


2,631 


Montgomery . 








246 


333 


187 


Palmer . 








10,316 


10,358 


5,674 


Russell . 








1,385 


1,366 


657 


Southwick 








4,479 


5.139 


2,330 



Population and Voters. 



225 



COUNTIES, CITIES 
AND TOWNS 



Population 



State 

Census 

1955 



U.S. 

Census 

1960 



Regis- 
tered 

Voters 
1962 



Hampden — Con. 
Springfield . 
Tolland . 
Wales . 
Westfield 
West Springfield 
Wilbraham 

Totals 

Hampshire. 
Amherst . 
Belchertown 
Chesterfield 
Cummington 
Easthampton - 
Goshen . 
Granby . 
Hadlev . 
Hatfield . 
Huntington 
Middlefield 
Northampton 
Pelham . 
Plainfield 
South Hadley , 
Southampton , 
Ware 

Westhampton , 
Williamsburg , 
Worthington . 

Totals 

Middlesex. 
Acton 
Arlington 
Ashby 
Ashland 
Ayer 
Bedford 
Belmont 
Billerica 
Boxborough 
Burlington 
Cambridge 
Carlisle . 
Chelmsford 



166.052 

101 

639 

22,046 

22.871 

5.600 



389,237 



8,204 
4,918 

515 

588 
11,698 

340 
2,853 
2,893 
2,236 
1,376 

335 
26,271 

658 

254 

11,307 

1,794 

7.603 

535 
2.248 

516 



87,142 



4,681 

47,148 

1,654 

5.828 

3,479 

8,776 

28.790 

14.403 

594 

5.225 

98.958 

1.138 

11.749 



174,463 

101 

659 

26.302 

24.924 

7,387 



429,353 



13.718 
5,186 

556 

550 
12,326 

385 
4,221 
3.099 
2.350 
1.392 

315 
30,058 

805 

237 

14.956 

2,192 

7.517 

583 
2,186 

597 



103,229 



7.238 
49.953 

1.883 

7.779 
14.927 
10,969 
28,715 
17,867 
744 
12,852 
107,716 

1,488 
15.130 



81.307 

78 

341 

12,933 

12,691 

4,162 



208.772 



4,615 

1.820 

295 

375 

6.458 

218 

1.755 

1.618 

1.351 

747 

171 

13.250 

438 

176 

6.711 

1,141 

4.763 

298 

1,130 

356 



47,686 



3,998 

28.650 

967 

3.635 

1,837 

3.915 

16,959 

8,001 

410 

6,926 

49,095 

796 

9,136 



226 



Population and Voters. 











Popltlation i 










Regis- 


COUNTIES. CITIES 


State i 
Census { 


U.S. 
Census 


tered 


AND TOWNS 


Voters 
1962 




1955 


1960 


Middlesex — Con. 








Concord . 




10,889 


12.517 


6,526 


Dracut . 








11,050 


13.674 


7.186 


Dunstable 








704 


824 


417 


Everett 








45,077 


43.544 


23.839 


Framingham 








31.589 


44.526 


22.226 


Groton . 








3.497 


3.904 


2,003 


HoUiston 








4.471 


6.222 


3.300 


Hopkinton 








4,407 


4,932 


2.560 


Hudson . 








8.904 


9.666 


5.221 


Lexington 








22.256 


27,691 


13,910 


Lincoln . 








2.949 


5,613 


2,235 


Littleton 








3,079 


5,109 


2,531 


Lowell . 








93.876 


92.107 


48.811 


Malden 








59.497 


57,676 


30,920 


Marlborough 








16.892 


18,819 


10,838 


Maynard 








7.253 


7,695 


4.060 


Medford 








65,393 


64.971 


35,160 


Melrose 








29.239 


29.619 


16,875 


Natick . 








26,213 


28.831 


14,094 


Newton 








86,535 


92.384 


49,608 


North Reading 








6,083 


8.331 


4.299 


Pepperell 








3,437 


4.336 


1,926 


Reading . 








16.440 


19,259 


10,432 


Sherborn 








1.439 


1,806 


1,116 


Shirley . 








2,832 


5,202 


1,639 


Somerville 








97,032 


94.697 


46,642 


Stoneham 








15,817 


17.821 


9,216 


Stow 








2,195 


2,573 


1.381 


Sudbury . 








3,646 


7,447 


4,112 


Tewksbury 








10,848 


15,902 


6,377 


Townsend 








3.365 


3.650 


1,943 


Tyngsborough 








2.868 


3.302 


1,665 


Wakefield 








22,115 


24,295 


13,072 


Waltham 








50,115 


55,413 


25,476 


Watertown 








38,898 


39,092 


20,235 


Wayland 








7,359 


10,444 


5.392 


Westford 








4,923 


6,261 


3.381 


Weston . 








6,257 


8,261 


4,526 


Wilmington 








9,408 


12,475 


5,667 


Winchester 








18,126 


19,376 


11,079 


WOBURN 








25,856 


31,214 


16,281 


Totals .... 


1,115,252 


1,238.742 


632,502 


Nantucket. 








Nantucket .... 


3,642 


3.559 


2,235 



Population and Voters. 



227 



Population 










Regis- 


COUNTIES. CITIES 


State 
Census 


U.S. 
Census 


tered 


AND TOWNS 


Voters 
1962 




1955 


1960 


Norfolk. 








Avon 


2.994 


4,301 


2,218 


Bellingham 










5.421 


6.774 


3.618 


Braintree 










26.698 


31.069 


16,595 


Brookline 










56,876 


54.044 


31,437 


Canton . 










10,128 


12.771 


6,983 


Cohasset 










4.729 


5,840 


3,363 


Dedham . 










21.450 


23.869 


12,983 


Dover 










2.245 


2.846 


1.796 


Foxborough 










8.537 


10,136 


4,495 


Franklin 










8,466 


10.530 


5,487 


Holbrook 










6.286 


10,104 


4,835 


Medfield 










5.293 


6,021 


2,818 


Medway 










4.169 


5,168 


3,369 


Millis . 










3.030 


4,374 


2,250 


Milton . 










24.043 


26.375 


16,126 


Needham 










21.560 


25,793 


14,806 


Norfolk . 










2.769 


3.471 


1,358 


Norwood 










21.052 


24,898 


13,158 


Plainville 










2.557 


3,810 


1,824 


QUINCY . 










84.495 


87,409 


46,495 


Randolph 










13.539 


18.900 


9,915 


Sharon . 










7,814 


10,070 


5.157 


Stoughton 










13.754 


16.328 


8,110 


Walpole . 










11.293 


14,068 


7,235 


Wellesley 










21.759 


26.071 


13,558 


W'estwood 










8,480 


10.354 


5.812 


Weymouth 










42,747 


48.177 


23,390 


Wrentham 










5.960 


6.685 


2,270 


Totals .... 


448,144 


510.256 


271.461 


Plymouth. 








Abington .... 


9,407 


10,607 


5,069 


Bridgewater 








9,059 


10.276 


4,259 


Brockton 








62.628 


72.813 


37,745 


Carver . 








1,669 


1.949 


906 


Duxbury 








4.280 


4,727 


2,910 


East Bridgewater 








5,359 


6,139 


3,037 


Halifax . 








1.377 


1,599 


1.011 


Hanover 








4,258 


5,923 


3,114 


Hanson . 








3,763 


4.370 


2,118 


Hingham 








13,418 


15.378 


8,022 


Hull 








5.824 


7,055 


3,979 


Kingston 








4,089 


4.302 


2,364 


Lakeville 








2.382 


3.209 


1.784 


Marion . 






2.776 


2,881 


1,635 



228 



Population and Voters. 





Population \ 










Regis- 


COUNTIES. CITIES 


State 

Census 


U.S. 

Census 


tered 


AND TOWNS 


Voters 
1962 




1955 


1960 


Plymouth — Con. 








Marshfield .... 


4,959 


6.748 


4,190 


Mattapoisett . 






2,661 


3.117 


1.873 


Middleborough 






11,119 


11.065 


5,953 


Norwell . 






4,127 


5.207 


2.731 


Pembroke 






3,838 


4.919 


1 2,797 


Plymouth 






13,892 


14,445 


I 9,103 


Plympton 






760 


821 


1 438 


Rochester 






1,439 


1.559 


1 747 


Rockland 






10,516 


13.119 


i 6,281 


Scituate . 






8,341 


11.214 


6,370 


Wareham 






8.612 


9.461 


4,718 


West Bridgewater 






4,558 


5.061 


2,622 


Whitman 






9.345 


10.485 


5,536 


Totals 


. 


214.456 


248,449 


131,302 


Suffolk 


' 








Boston . 




724,702 


697.197 


319,529 


Chelsea 


. 


36,826 


33.749 


I 16,690 


Revere . 


. 


39.565 


40.080 


i 21,690 


Winthrop 


• 


18,704 


20.303 


10,684 


Totals .... 


819.797 


791.329 


368,593 


Worcester. 








Ashburnham .... 


2.588 


2.758 


1.650 


Athol 






12,186 


11.637 


6.240 


Auburn . 






12.442 


14 047 


7.470 


Barre 






3.591 


3.479 


1.927 


Berlin 






1 1,516 


1.742 


1 870 


Blackstone 






5.023 


5,130 


2.723 


Bolton . 






1.101 


1.264 


694 


Boylston 






1,886 


2,367 


1.305 


Brookfield 






1,774 


1.751 


972 


Charlton 






3,466 


3,685 


1,709 


Clinton . 






12,754 


12.848 


7.200 


Douglas . 






2,666 


2,559 


1,509 


Dudley . 






5,596 


6.510 


3,357 


East Brookfield 






1,391 


1,533 


! 822 


FiTCHBURG 






42.925 


43,021 


! 21,171 


Gardner 






20,108 


19,038 


9,853 


Grafton . 






9,803 


10.627 


4,656 


Hardwick 






2,271 


2.340 


1,205 


Harvard . 






1,597 


2.563 


1,087 


Holden . 






8,608 


10.117 


5,728 


Hopedale 






3.773 


3.987 


2.436 



Population and Voters. 



229 





Population 










Regis- 


COUNTIES. CITIES 


State 
Census 


U.S. 
Census 


tered 


AND TOWNS 


Voters 
1962 




1955 


1960 


Worcester — Con. 






1 


Hubbardston . 




1.162 


1,217 


709 


Lancaster 








3.835 


3,958 


2,046 


Leicester 








7.290 


8,177 


4,217 


Leominster . 








24.787 


27.929 


14,348 


Lunenburg 








5.282 


6,334 


1 3,285 


Men don . 








1.905 


2.068 


1,159 


Milford . 








15,622 


15.749 


8.828 


Millbury 








9.282 


9.623 


5,257 


MiUviUe . 








1.583 


1.567 


879 


New Braintree 








471 


509 


241 


Northborough . 








4.943 


6.687 


3.319 


Northbridge 








10,626 


10.800 


5,820 


North Brookfield 








3.455 


3.616 


1,926 


Oakham . 








522 


524 


305 


Oxford . 








7,777 


9.282 


4.257 


Paxton . 








1,565 


2.399 


1.425 


Petersham 








929 


890 


514 


Phillipston 








748 


695 


402 


Princeton 








1.196 


1.360 


795 


Royalston 








848 


800 


420 


Rutland . 








2.430 


3.253 


1.247 


Shrewsbury 








13,103 


16.622 


8,665 


Southborough . 








3.173 


3.996 


1.919 


Southbridge 








17.271 


16.523 


9.171 


Spencer . 








7.611 


7.838 


4.292 


Sterling . 








2.724 


3.193 


1.691 


Sturbridge 








3.413 


3.604 


1.935 


Sutton 








3.423 


3,638 


1,879 


Templeton 








5.384 


5,371 


2,498 


Upton 








2.921 


3.127 


1,649 


Uxbridge 








7.596 


7.789 


4,174 


Warren . 








3,509 


3.383 


1,900 


Webster . 








13.934 


13,680 


7,898 


Westborough . 








8,130 


9,599 


3,987 


West Boylston 








4,143 


5.526 


2.974 


West Brookfield 








1,935 


2.053 


1.111 


Westminster . 








3,505 


4.022 


1.950 


Winchendon 








6,710 


6.237 


3.188 


Worcester 








202,612 


186.587 


94.424 


Totals 








574.420 


583.228 


301.288 



230 



Population and Voters. 



RECAPITULATION. 







Number 

of 

Cities 

and 

Towns 


Population 


Regis- 
tered 

Voters 
State 

Election 
1962 


COUNTIES 


State 

Census 

1955 


U.S. 

Census 

1960 


Barnstable 


15 


52,728 


70.286 


38.255 


Berkshire . 




32 


138.119 


142,135 


74,130 


Bristol 




20 


389.540 


398.488 


209.332 


Dukes County . 




7 


6,069 


5.829 


3,696 


Essex 




34 


543,526 


568.831 


315.802 


Franklin . 




26 


55,573 


54,864 


30,032 


Hampden . 




23 


389.237 


429,353 


208,772 


Hampshire 




20 


87.142 


103,229 


47.686 


Middlesex 




54 


1,115,252 


1.238,742 


632,502 


Nantucket 




1 


^3,642 


3,559 


2,235 


Norfolk . 




28 


448,144 


510,256 


271,461 


Plymouth 




27 


214,456 


248,449 


131,302 


Suffolk . 




4 


819,797 


791,329 


368,593 


Worcester 




60 


574,420 


583,228 


301.288 


Totals 


351 


4,837,645 


5,148,578 


l2.635.086 

1 



VOTE FOR 

PRESIDENT, 

MEMBERS OF CONGRESS 

AND 

STATE OFFICERS 



Vote for President in 1960. 



233 



VOTE FOR ELECTORS OF PRESIDENT AND 
VICE PRESIDENT IN 1960 

(BY COUNTIES) 



Election, November 8, 1960. 



COUNTY OF BARNSTABLE. 





c 


^ 


.y 


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eg 


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3 


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Cities A^fD Towns. 


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•5.5 

§8 




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<-> 




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o 




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s 


H 


Barnstable .... 


5 


6 


2,783 


4,515 


_ 


65 


7.374 


Bourne 








1! 1 


1,172 


1.635 




23 


2.832 


Brewster 








— 


— 


174 


627 




6 


807 


Chatham . 








3 


— 


405 


1.552 




17 


1,977 


Dennis 








2 


5 


651 


1.751 


- 


22 


2.431 


Eastham 








— 


— 


158 


619 




5 


782 


Falmouth . 








4 


3 


2.841 


2.921 


- 


48 


5.817 


Harwich 








5 1 


599 


1.725 


— 


21 


2,351 


Mashpee . 








1 


2 


169 


115 


— 


— 


287 


Orleans 










1 


326 


1,184 


- 


10 


1,521 


Provincetown 








4 


— 


1,201 


546 




32 


1,783 


Sandwich . 








1 


— 


410 


686 


— 


10 


1,107 


Truro 










- 


212 


259 


- 


2 


473 


Wellfleet . 








1 


1 


242 


527 


— 


14 


785 


Yarmouth . 








1 


1 


1,080 


2,238 


- 


24 


3,344 


Totals . 








28 


21 


12.423 


20.900 


- 


299 


33.671 



COUNTY OF BERKSHIRE, 



Adams .... 


8 


7 


4,717 


1,786 


_ 


112 


6.630 


Alford .... 


_ 


_ 


25 


100 


_ 




125 


Becket .... 


- 


- 


170 


210 


- 


4 


384 


Cheshire .... 


- 


1 


706 


456 


" 


14 


1.177 



234 



Vote for President in 1960. 



COUNTY OF BERKSHIRE — Conc/Mied. 





c 


^ 


^o 


c 










.2 




S 2 


.y 










io 


J 


s§ 


3 








. 


gl 


.-■S 


^B 


.S 










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c:s 


o <u 


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Cities and Towns. 


•a 
a 




c 


r 






1 




<a 


T3 


>. 


C 


aj 




"rt 






c 


•o 


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ca 








4J 

n 

c 


1 


6 




o 




Q 


X 


'^ 


g 


< 


M 


'f 


Clarksburg 


2 




478 


381 


_ 


12 


873 


Dalton 






8 


3 


1.654 


1,536 


- 


23 


3,224 


Egremont . 








— 


112 


385 


— 


5 


502 


Florida 






— 


— 


103 


171 


— 


2 


276 


Great Barrington 






2 


3 


1,792 


1,564 


- 


44 


3.405 


Hancock 






1 


1 


58 


153 


2 


215 


Hinsdale 






— 


1 


346 


325 


- 


12 


684 


Lanesborough 






1 




675 


667 


13 


1,356 


Lee . 






2 


2 


1.365 


1,039] - 


28 


2,436 


Lenox 






_ 


3 


1.116 


967 - 


16 


2,102 


Monterey . 






_ 




97 


174 - 


6 


277 


Mount VVashington 






_ 


- 


12 


23 


— 


- 


35 


New Ashford 






_ 


_ 


35 


39 


— 


2 


76 


New ]\!arlborough 






_ 


- 


142 


351 




3 


496 


North Adams 






7 


3 


6,883 


2,851 


1 


116 


9.861 


Otis . 






_ 




68 


187 




3 


258 


Peru . 






_ 


_ 


33 


64 




~ 


97 


PiTTSFIELD 






12 


73 


17,356 


9,768 




354 


27,563 


Richmond . 










163 


275 


- 


2 


440 


Sandisfield . 






_ 


— 


123 


114 


12 


249 


Savoy 






_ 


_ 


57 


98 


1 


3 


159 


Sheffield . 






1 


1 


313 


699 


- 


8 


1.022 


Stockbridge 






2 


5 


546 


610 


— 


10 


1,173 


Tyringhain 








- 


51 


67 


- 


2 


120 


Wasliington 






- 


- 


52 


71 


_ 


3 


126 


West Stockbridge 






I 


1 


332 


304 


- 


11 


649 


Williamstown 






5 


3 


1.491 


1.789 


1 


24 


3,313 


Windsor . 








- 


61 


HI 




5 


177 


Totals . 






52 


107 


41,132 


27,335 


3 851 


69,480 



Vote for President in 1960. 



235 



COUNTY OF BRISTOL. 





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5- 


.y 


c 










.2 


1 


s 2 


1 










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w y 


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Cities and Towns. 




•n.2 


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cd 


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13 




u 


S 


T3 


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^ 


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75 
o 




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2 


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I " 


H 


Acushnei .... 




2 


1,996 


688 




20 


2,706 


Attleboro 






3 


12 


6.402 


6,186 


- 


113 


12.716 


Berkley 






2 


3 


303 


439 


— 


13 


760 


Dartmouth 






4 


6 


4,292 


3.194 


— 


79 


7,575 


Dighton 






1 


- 


877 


854 


- 


18 


1.750 


Easton 






3 


8 


1,766 


2.676 


— 


22 


4,475 


Fairhaven . 






9 


6 


4,599 


2,920 


1 


51 


7,586 


Fall River 






44 


56 


39,036 


10,055 


- 


536 


49.727 


Freetown . 






2 


1 


651 


737 


- 


14 


1,405 


Mansfield . 






2 


1 


1,957 


2.025 


33 


4.018 


New Bedford . 






46 


84 


37,600 


13,372 


1 548 


51,651 


North Attleborough 






9 


7 


3.726 


3,366 


- 


86 


7,194 


Norton 








1 


1,254 


1,491 


- 


33 


2,779 


Raynham 








1 


1 


900 


1.155 


- 


28 


2,085 


Rehoboth 








1 


— 


950 


1,317 


— 


30 


2,298 


Seekonk 








4 


3 


1.950 


1.979 


- 


51 


3,987 


Somerset 








17 


3 


4.231 


2,164 


— 


38 


6.453 


Swansea 








3 


6 


3.055 


2.022 


47 


5,133 


Taunton 








15 


7 


12.652 


6.053 


- 226 


18,953 


VVestport 








5 


3 


1,852 


1.597 


-i 38 


3,495 


Totals .... 


'" 


210 


130.049 


64,290 


2 


2.024 


196,746 



COUNTY OF DUKES COUNTY. 



Chilmark .... 


1 


36 


131 




1 


169 


Edgartown 








>. 


- 


250 


547 


— 


12 


809 


Gay Head . 










- 


20 


28 


- 


3 


51 


Gosnold 








- 


- 


10 


36 


— 




46 


Oak Bluffs . 








2 




388 


441 


— 


9 


840 


Tisbury 








1 


1 


521 


649 


- 


19 


1,191 


West Tisbury 










- 


57 


166 


1 


2 


226 


Totals . 








4 


1 


1.282 


1.998 


1 


46 


3.332 



236 



Vote for President in 1960. 



COUNTY OF ESSEX. 





c 

.2 

3 


c 




e 

03 

3 










il 


'£•.=: 


e 2 


m| 








Cities and Towns. 


s"- 


1' 
o o 


T3 


TJPi 






m 






UC/2 


cS 


"O 


CO 




s. 




cc 


T) 


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c 


il 




"rt 




u 


C 


•a 


03 


A 


„ 


a 






CO 


s 


a 
o 


6 




"rt 






to 

03 


g 


y. 




03 


o 




Q 


ffi 


^ 


2 


< 


s 


H 


Amesbury .... 


7 


4 


3,198 


2,433 


_ 


54 


5,696 


Andover 








— 


6 


3,582 


5,685 


— 


63 


9,336 


Beverly . 








5 


19 


8.286 


9,728 




104 


18,142 


Boxford 








1 


- 


200 


879 


— 


6 


1.086 


Danvers 








5 


7 


4.729 


5,097 


- 


76 


9,914 


Essex 








— 


— 


370 


828 


— 


10 


1.208 


Georgetown 








1 


1 


543 


1.324 


- 


9 


1.878 


Gloucester 








4 


10 


6.719 


6,005 


— 


143 


12.881 


Groveland . 








- 


2 


605 


1.005 


— 


11 


1,623 


Hamilton . 








2 


3 


832 


1.914 


- 


21 


2.772 


Haverhill 








12 


25 


13,588 


9,281 


— 


238 


23,144 


Ipswich 








3 


1 


2,017 


2,625 


— 


34 


4,680 


Lawrence . 








40 


70 


29,476 


7,667 


— 


536 


37.789 


Lynn 








29 


120 


31,001 


16,746 


- 


442 


48.338 


Lynnfield . 








- 


3 


1.495 


3,032 


- 


21 


4.551 


Manchester 








— 


— 


702 


1,490 


— 


16 


2.208 


Marblehead 








3 


9 


3.477 


7,257 


— 


51 


10.797 


Merrimac . 








— 


_ 


601 


1.064 


— 


19 


1.684 


Methuen 








13 


16 


8,872 


6,025 


- 


166 


15,092 


Middleton . 








- 


— 


627 


923 


- 


22 


1,572 


Nahant 








3 


3 


1.025 


896 


- 


12 


1,939 


Newbury . 








1 


— 


473 


1.113 


— 


9 


1,596 


Newburyport 








7 


4 


3,939 


3,513 


— 


86 


7.549 


North Andover 








9 


7 


3,097 


2,897 


- 


54 


6.064 


Peabody . 








12 


31 


11,156 


5,431 


— 


207 


16.837 


Rockport . 








5 


6 


901 


1.867 


- 


24 


2.803 


Rowley 








— 


— 


389 


901 


— 


6 


1.296 


Salem 








18 


26 


15,879 


5,188 


— 


216 


21,327 


Salisbury 








1 


4 


674 


1,157 


— 


20 


1,856 


Saugus 








5 


26 


4.988 


5,283 


- 


77 


10.379 


Swampscott 








4 


8 


3,538 


4.243 


- 


55 


7.848 


Topsfield . 








1 


1 


380 


1,271 


— 


1 


1.654 


Wenham 








— 


1 


246 


1,155 


— 


10 


1.412 


West Newbury 








- 


3 


270 


676 


- 


9 


958 


Totals . 




• 




191 


416 


167,875 


126.599 


- 


2.828 


297.909 



Vote for President in 1960. 



237 



COUNTY OF FRANKLIN. 





c 


^^ 


.u 


c 










o 


o 




rt 










!5 




c 2 


.^ 










J 


J 


w y 


3 










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3 

a, Q 








Cities and Towns. 




o O 




r 






«j 




■§ 


Uc/3 


% 


"o 


00 




o 




rt 


T5 


>. 


c 


fc 




"rt 






C 


1 

g 


s 


c 


m 


n 

1 




Q 


K 


Ui 


2 


< . 


« 


H 


Ashfield 




1 


115 


439 


_ 


9 


564 


Bernardston 








- 


- 


115 


523 


- 


7 


645 


Buckland . 








— 


1 


265 


638 


— 


6 


910 


Charlemont 










— 


106 


338 


— 


3 


448 


Colrain 










_ 


260 


447 


_ 


8 


716 


Conway 










- 


134 


306 


- 


3 


444 


Deerfield . 










3 


904 


726 


— 


29 


1,663 


Erving 










1 


329 


317 


- 


9 


657 


Gill . 








_ 


_ 


221 


362 


— 


3 


586 


Greenfield . 








16 


6 


4,484 


4,692 


- 


85 


9,283 


Hawley 








_ 


— 


22 


77 


— 


1 


100 


Heath 








_ 


_ 


41 


115 


— 


- 


156 


Leverett 








_ 


1 


96 


281 


- 


4 


382 


Leyden 








- 


- 


57 


95 


- 


2 


154 


Monroe 








- 


- 


48 


35 


— 


4 


87 


Montague . 








4 


1 


2,867 


1,429 


- 


59 


4,360 


New Salem 








— 


- 


34 


193 


— 


5 


232 


Northfield . 








1 


- 


258 


906 


— 


9 


1.174 


Orange 








2 


2 


936 


1,969 


- 


25 


2.934 


Rowe 








— 


1 


21 


109 


— 


1 


132 


Shelburne . 








1 


- 


208 


806 


— 


12 


1.027 


Shutesbury 










- 


59 


68 


- 


- 


127 


Sunderland 








— 


— 


314 


302 


— 


11 


627 


Warwick 








_ 


_ 


56 


186 


— 


6 


248 


Wendell . 








1 


- 


57 


88 


- 


2 


148 


Whately . 








- 


- 


275 


235 


- 


12 


522 


Totals . 








30 


17 


12,282 


15.682 


- 


315 


28.326 



COUNTY OF HAMPDEN. 



Agawam 


1 


11 


4.577 


3.188 


_ 


104 


7.881 


Blandford .... 


_ 


- 


98 


315 


- 


5 


418 


Brimfield .... 


_ 


1 


284 


388 


- 


2 


675 


Chester .... 


_ 




243 


364 


- 


9 


616 


Chicopee .... 


21 


41 


19.631 


5,220 


" 


329 


25,242 



238 



Vote for President in 1960. 



COUNTY OF UAM-P-D-E.^ — Concluded. 





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Cities and Towns. 


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East Longraeadow 


3 


20 


2.122 


3.0711 - 


18 


5,234 


Granville . 






_ 




109 


368, - 


5 


482 


Hampden . 








- 


2 


464 


723 - 


8 


1.197 


Holland 








1 


_ 


132 


180! - 


1 


314 


HOLYOKE . 








13 


107 


18,859 


7.010 - 


400 


26.389 


Longmeadow 








4 


5 


1.715 


4.218 


27 


5.969 


Ludlow 








6 


5 


4.626 


1.745 


90 


6.472 


Monson 








2 


2 


1.289 


1,2261 - 


24 


2,543 


Montgomery 








_ 




44 


128 - 


1 


173 


Palmer 








4 


3 


3,666 


1.753 - 


44 


5,470 


Russell 








1 


2 


289 


336 - 


3 


631 


Southwick . 








2 


- 


1,056 


1,1871 - 


15 


2.260 


Springfield 








38 363 


46.541 


27.8331 - 


1.269 


76,044 


Tolland 








_ 


- 


13 


60" - 


- 


73 


Wales 








1 


2 


159 


1401 - 


4 


306 


West Springfield 








9 


12 


6,785 


5.303 - 


135 


12,244 


Westfield 








13 


13 


6,870 


5,038! 1 


121 


12.056 


Wilbrahara 








2 2 


1.489 


2,260 - 


34 


3.787 


ToUls .... 


121 


59] 


121.061 


72.054 


1 


2,648 


196.476 



COUNTY OF HAMPSHIRE. 



Amherst .... 


4 


14 


1.789 


2,716 


_ 


49 


4.572 


Belchertown 








- 


1 


815 


885 


— 


18 


1,719 


Chesterfield 








1 


1 


46 


214 


— 


3 


265 


Cummington 








1 


1 


51 


287 


- 


6 


346 


East ham pton 








5 


6 


4,083 


2.202 


- 


76 


6.372 


Goshen 








— 


— 


38 


169 


— 


2 


209 


Granby 








1 


2 


909 


707 


- 


9 


1.628 


Hadley 








- 


4 


1,013 


434 


- 


23 


1.474 


Hatfield . 








2 


- 


819 


348 


_ 


19 


1,188 


Huntington 










- 


345 


368 


- 


8 


721 


Middlefield 








- 


- 


39 


97 


— 


- 


136 


Northampton 








2 


14 


7,702 


5.040 


_ 


156 


12,914 


Pelham 












113 


284 


' 


4 


401 



Vote for President in 1960. 



239 



COUNTY OF HAMPSHIRE — Conc/wded. 







I, 


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c 










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Cities and Towns. 




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Plainfield .... 


_ 




28 


128 




1 


157 


South Hadley 








4 


3 


3.671 


2,629 


3 


74 


6,384 


Southampton 








— 




492 


554 


- 


7 


.1.053 


Ware . 








.3 


4 


3.151 


1.190 


_ 


67 


4,415 


Westhampton 








- 


- 


79 


200 


- 


1 


280 


Williamsburg 








2 


4 


433 


643 


— 


11 


1,093 


Worthington 








1 




51 


251 


- 


7 


310 


Totals .... 


26 


"i 


25.667 


19.346 


3 


541 


45.637 



COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX. 











1 


5 










11 


35 










6 


2 










1 


6 










2 


1 










1 
11 


9 
18 










4 


4 










3 


6 










32 


110 










- 


2 










3 


2 










1 


4 










4 


8 










2 


3 










9 


100 


m 








11 


13 










2 


1 










1 


_ 










2 


4 



1.073 

16,069 

294 

1,815 

911 

1,518 

8,527 

4.325 

94 

3,240 

34,029 

139 

3,628 

2,545 

4.497 

129 

15,360 

11.977 

769 

1.180 

1,107 

3.125 



2.464 


_ 


19 


11,777 


— 


182 


590 


- 


7 


1,673 


- 


17 


848 


_ 


16 


2,130 


- 


21 


8,275 


4 


118 


3.104 


- 


44 


272 


- 


4 


2.326 


- 


51 


13,691 


- 


566 


567 


- 


4 


4,124 


- 


53 


3.691 


- 


43 


2.061 


- 


63 


262 


- 


6 


6,778 


- 


318 


8,985 


- 


152 


1,098 


- 


17 


1.791 


- 


12 


1,295 


_ 


13 


1.764 


- 


55 



240 



Vote for President in 1960. 



COUNTY OF MIT>DLESKX — Concluded. 





c 
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u 
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Cities and Towns. 


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^Q 


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o o 


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Lexington .... 


6 


53 


5,371 


7,484 


_ 


237 


13,151 


Lincoln 








2 


3 


742 


1,307 


— 


8 


2,062 


Littleton . 








3 


7 


901 


1,262 


~ 


17 


2.190 


Lowell 








21 


35 


34.186 


12,343 




545 


47,130 


Malden 








14 


45 


19,449 


10,753 


- 


367 


30,628 


Marlborough 








6 


11 


6,618 


3,245 


- 


117 


9,997 


Maynard . 








2 


8 


2,381 


1,472 


2 


33 


3,898 


Medford . 








14 


24 


22,964 


11,032 


- 


301 


34,335 


Melrose . 








8 


10 


6,048 


10,257 


— 


102 


16,425 


Natick 








5 


10 


7,160 


6,521 


— 


112 


13,808 


Newton 








45 


101 


24,482 


23,421 


6 


400 


48,455 


North Reading 








3 


— 


1,701 


2,206 


- 


20 


3,930 


Pepperell . 










3 


786 


999 


- 


24 


1.812 


Reading 








2 


7 


3,507 


6.355 


— 


64 


9,935 


Sherborn 








- 


- 


284 


729 


- 


9 


1,022 


Shirley 








1 


1 


735 


544 


- 


16 


1,297 


Somerville 








27 


67 


33,498 


11,301 


- 


486 


45,379 


Stoneham, . 








4 


7 


4,599 


4,240 


— 


53 


8,903 


Stow . 








- 


4 


418 


879 


- 


8 


1.309 


Sudbury 








1 


1 


1,252 


2,226 


1 


16 


3,497 


Tewksbury 








- 


4 


3,678 


2,380 


- 


31 


6,093 


Townsend . 








- 


- 


671 


1,104 


— 


11 


1.786 


Tyngsborough 








2 


1 


850 


691 


- 


24 


1,568 


Wakefield . 








7 


3 


6,411 


6,211 


— 


76 


12,708 


Waltham . 








12 


100 


15,520 


9,329 


- 


222 


25,183 


Watertown 








16 


34 


12,743 


7,416 


1 


235 


20,445 


Wayland . 








3 


6 


1,818 


3,204 


1 


29 


5,061 


Westtord . 








1 


3 


1,663 


1,417 


- 


32 


3,116 


Weston 








3 


3 


1.178 


3,089 


- 


18 


4,291 


Wilmington 








1 


3 


2,804 


2,462 


- 


36 


5,306 


Winchester 








3 


9 


4,750 


5,977 


— 


71 


10,810 


WOBURN 








15 


14 


10,611 


4,696 


1 


102 


15.439 


Totals . 








334 


910 


356,130 


246,126 


16 


5,603 


609,119 



Vote for President in 1960. 



241 



COUNTY OF NANTUCKET. 





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Cities and Towns. 




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Nantucket 


- 


2 


698 


1,219 


- 


20 


1.939 



COUNTY OF NORFOLK. 



Avon .... 




1 


1,110 


928 




18 


2,057 


Bellingham 








2 


4 


2,224 


967 


- 


42 


3,239 


Braintree . 








5 


11 


8.284 


7,479 




82 


15,861 


Brookline . 








20 


157 


16.104 


15,122 


_ 


259 


31,662 


Canton 








5 


8 


3,724 


2.521 


- 


60 


6,318 


Cohasset 








3 


2 


1.257 


1.886 


_ 


11 


3,159 


Dedham 








4 


13 


6,917 


5.307 


- 


99 


12,340 


Dover 








3 


2 


403 


1.268 


_ 


9 


1,685 


Foxborough 








3 


7 


1.705 


2.465 


- 


20 


4,200 


Franklin 








5 


4 


3.085 


1,691 


— 


62 


4.847 


Holbrook . 








3 


2 


2.386 


2,161 


- 


44 


4.596 


Medfield . 








5 


2 


924 


1,448 


— 


13 


2.392 


Medway 








2 


1 


1.327 


1,223 


- 


27 


2,580 


Millis. 








1 


1 


977 


1,096 


_ 


17 


2.092 


Milton 








5 


11 


8.517 


6,860 


_ 


117 


15.510 


Needham . 








6 


4 


4,757 


9,353 


_ 


85 


14.205 


Norfolk 








5 


3 


519 


705 




9 


1.241 


Norwood . 








4 


13 


8,086 


4,292 


- 


86 


12.481 


Plainville . 








1 


1 


716 


998 


_ 


22 


1.738 


QUIXCY 








22 


53 


26.990 


18,163 


- 


337 


45.565 


Randolph . 








3 


7 


5.741 


3,120 




46 


8,917 


Sharon 








3 


9 


2.535 


2,291 




20 


4,858 


Stoughton . 








4 


7 


4.400 


3,163 




64 


7,638 


Walpole 








4 


4 


3.450 


3,238 


_ 


34 


6.730 


Wellesley . 








9 


8 


4.209 


8,887 


1 


84 


13,198 


Westwood . 








4 


8 


2,065 


3.533 




31 


5,641 


Weymouth 








10 


14 


12,252 


10.197 




96 


22,569 


Wrentham . 








1 


3 


810 


1.382 


15 


2,211 


Totals . 








142 


360 


135.474 


121.744 


1 


1,809 


259.530 



242 



Vote for President in 1960. 



COUNTY OF PLYMOUTH. 



Cities and Towns. 



o o 



o o 
•T3 



o 



Abington .... 


3 


4 


2,340 


2.716 


_ 


35 


5,098 


Bridgewater 






1 


7 


1.910 


1.783 


— 


63 


3.764 


Brockton 






14 


54 


20,164 


14,153 


_ 


354 


34.739 


Carver 








1 


294 


456 


- 


13 


764 


Duxbury 






1 


— 


624 


1.966 


— 


26 


2.617 


East Bridgewater 






5 


1 


1,051 


1.756 


- 


18 


2.831 


Halifax 






1 


2 


331 


524 


— 


. 7 


865 


Hanover 






1 


1 


1.035 


1.749 


— 


15 


2.801 


Hanson 






3 


2 


688 


1,232 


- 


14 


1,939 


Hingham . 






7 


8 


3.141 


4,500 


— 


42 


7.698 


Hull . 






5 


3 


2.394 


1,184 


_ 


39 


3,625 


Kingston . 






2 


2 


1.044 


1,156 


— 


29 


2,233 


Lakeville . 






4 


1 


602 


906 


_ 


27 


1.540 


Marion 






1 


1 


436 


1,025 


_ 


22 


1.485 


Marshfield . 






2 


3 


1,480 


2,121 


- 


14 


3,620 


Mattapoisett 






1 


1 


653 


1,007 


- 


16 


1.678 


Middleborough . 






1 


1 


2,108 


3,048 


— 


47 


5,205 


Nor^vell 






1 


2 


933 


1,674 


— 


11 


2.621 


Pembroke 








1 


6 


904 


1,441 


_ 


15 


2.367 


Plymouth 








6 


5 


3,817 


3,586 


- 


90 


7,504 


Plympton 








_ 


- 


121 


264 


— 


2 


387 


Rochester 








2 


_ 


224 


461 


_ 


3 


690 


Rockland 








6 


2 


3,485 


2.516 


- 


37 


6,046 


Scituate 








2 


4 


2,458 


3,109 


— 


48 


5,621 


Wareham 








2 


2 


1.794 


2,092 


_ 


56 


3.946 


West Bridgewater 






3 


1 


858 


1,691 


- 


22 


2.575 


Whitman . 






1 


7 


2.286 


2,861 


- 


33 


5,188 


Totals 


• 






76 


121 


57.175 


60,977 


- 


1.098 


119,447 



Vote for President in 1960. 



243 



COUNTY OF SUFFOLK. 



Cities and Towns. 







o 






rt 


XI 


J 






c'2i 




cp. 


•S.i^ 


^^ 


1-?. 






"O 


uw 






CO 


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a 


s 

CD 


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Boston 
Chelsea 
Revere 
Winthrop 

Totals 



210 

27 

14 

7 


713 218.422 
23! 12.477 
37; 15.280 
12| 6,644 


74,086 
2,989 
4,794 
3.881 


1 


4,262 

292 

239 

80 


297,694 
15,808 
20.364 
10.624 


258 


785, 252,823 


85,750 


1 


4.873 


344,490 



COUNTY OF WORCESTER. 



Ashburnham 








. 


1 


706 


723 


_ 


22 


1,453 


Athol 








2 


3 


2,789 


3.135 


_ 


69 


5,998 


Auburn 








- 


6 


3,454 


3.538 


- 


60 


7,058 


Barre 








3 


1 


960 


819 


— 


24 


1,807 


Berlin 








- 


_ 


227 


618 


_ 


6 


851 


Blackstone 








4 


2 


1.955 


521 


- 


37 


2.519 


Bolton 








3 


2 


170 


459 


— 


9 


643 


Boylston 








- 


- 


458 


776 


- 


7 


1,241 


Brookfield . 








2 


— 


345 


532 


— 


9 


888 


Charlton . 








3 


3 


747 


877 


— 


24 


1,654 


Clinton 








6 


13 


4,460 


2.088 


- 


103 


6.670 


Douglas 








- 




836 


636 


— 


13 


1.485 


Dudley 








5 


3 


2.307 


858 


_ 


31 


3,204 


East Brookfield 










1 


383 


370 


- 


17 


771 


FlTCHBURG 








9 


28 


13.951 


6,796 


_ 


251 


21.035 


Gardner . 








8 


6 


6.457 


2.965 


- 


118 


9,554 


Grafton 








3 


1 


2.638 


1.807 


— 


44 


4,493 


Hardwick . 








3 


1 


778 


395 


_ 


14 


1.191 


Harvard 








- 


- 


260 


754 


- 


10 


l.®24 


Holden 








1 


8 


1.558 


3.847 


— 


37 


5,451 


Hopedale 








1 


1 


1.056 


1.217 


- 


11 


2,286 


Hubbardston 








1 


1 


210 


397 


- 


5 


614 


Lancaster . 








4 


2 


625 


1.327 


_ 


35 


1,993 


Leicester 








1 


5 


2.334 


1.437 


- 


51 


3,828 


Leominster 








10 


7 


8.899 


4.554 


— 


171 


13,641 


Lunenburg . 








4 


3 


1.363 


1,732 


- 


32 


3.134 



244 



Vote for President in 1960. 



COUNTY OF WORCESTER — Condwded. 





s 


t; 


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c 










o 


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rt 










3 
















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3 










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Cities and Towns. 


1^ 


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^Q 


-OP^ 










*§ 


^c^ 




t3 


0) 




1 




rt 


"d 


>. 


c 


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o 


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c 


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m 


H 


Mendon .... 


3 




416 


666 


_ 


7 


1.092 


Milford 








9 


10 


6,349 


2,163 


— 


89 


8,620 


Millbury . 








6 


2 


3,211 


1,706 


- 


21 


4.946 


Millville . 








— 


- 


665 


167 


— 


5 


837 


New Braintree 








— 


— , 


71 


147 


— 


1 


219 


North Brookfield 








1 


- 


1,085 


768 


- 


15 


1.869 


Northborough 








- 


2 


1,255 


1,950 


- 


25 


3,232 


Northbridge 








2 


2 


3,432 


2,349 


— 


48 


5,833 


Oakham . 








1 


- 


91 


193 


— 


1 


286 


Oxford 










1 


4 


2,467 


1,557 


- 


33 


4.062 


Paxton 










- 


2 


460 


786 


- 


8 


1.256 


Petersham 










1 


— 


124 


311 


2 


3 


441 


PhilUpston 










_ 


_ 


130 


208 


— 


2 


340 


Princeton 










- 


- 


156 


533 


- 


6 


695 


Royalston 










3 


- 


163 


186 


— 


4 


356 


Rutland 












2 


473 


682 


- 


12 


1.169 


Shrewsbury 








5 


3 


4.124 


4,090 


— 


54 


8,276 


Southborough 








4 


19 


890 


1,072 


- 


22 


2.007 


Southbridge 








8 


6 


6,932 


2.075 


— 


106 


9,127 


Spencer 








5 


2 


2,562 


1,457 


1 


66 


4,093 


SterUng 










2 


1 


493 


1,148 


- 


12 


1,656 


Sturbridge 










2 


4 


1,084 


734 


- 


17 


1,841 


Sutton 










1 


2 


803 


964 


— 


13 


1,783 


Templeton 










2 


2 


1,224 


1,086 


- 


21 


2,335 


Upton 










1 


1 


638 


931 


— 


12 


1.583 


Uxbridge 










3 


1 


2,677 


1.248 


- 


47 


3,976 


Warren 










_ 


3 


1.104 


677 


— 


14 


1,798 


Webster 










5 


8 


5,604 


1,850 


- 


69 


7.536 


West Boylston 








- 


7 


1,110 


1,519 


- 


14 


2,650 


West Brookfield 








- 


3 


410 


660 


— 


81 


1,081 


Westborough 








3 


5 


1,354 


2,289 


— 


23 


3,674 


Westminster 








2 


2 


781 


1,041 


— 


20 


1,846 


Winchendon 








5 


5 


1,911 


1,087 
31,252 


- 


31 


3,039 


Worcester 








51 


101 


58,928 


- 


1.030 


91.362 


Totals 










200 


297 


173,103 


112,730 


3 


3,069 


289,402 



Vote for President in 1960. 



245 



AGGREGATE OF VOTES FOR ELECTORS OF PRESIDENT 
AND VICE PRESIDENT IN 1960. 



Counties. 


1 

1^ 


1 


13 


c 
.y 

3 










c 
a; 


rt 


C 

>. 

c 
c 
ti 


C 

o 


< 


5 


2 

1 

c 


Barnstable . 


28 


21 


12,423 


20.900 


- 


299 


33,671 


Berkshire . 






52 


107 


41.132 


27.335 


3 


851 


69.480 


Bristol 






171 


210 


130,049 


64,290 


2 


2.024 


196.746 


Dukes County 






4 


1 


1.282 


1.998 


1 


46 


3.332 


Essex . 






191 


416 


167.875 


126.599 


- 


2.828 


297,909 


Franklin 






30 


17 


12.282 


15.682 


- 


315 


28.326 


Hampden 






121 


591 


121.061 


72.054 


1 


2.648 


196,476 


Hampshire . 






26 


54 


25.667 


19.346 


3 


541 


45,637 


Middlesex . 






334 


910 


356,130 


246.126 


16 


5.603 


609.119 


Nantucket . 






- 


2 


698 


1.219 


- 


20 


1,939 


Norfolk 






142 


360 


135.474 


121.744 


1 


1,809 


259,530 


Plymouth 






76 


121 


57.175 


60.977 


- 


1.098 


119.447 


Suffolk 






258 


785 


252.823 


85.750 


1 


4,873 


344.490 


Worcester . 






200 


297 


173.103 


112.730 


3 


3.069 


289,402 


Totals 


1.633 


3.892 


1.487.174 


976.750 


3. 


26,024 


2,495.504 



246 Vote for Senator in Congress in 1960. 

VOTE FOR SENATOR IN CONGRESS IN 1960. 

(BY COUNTIES.) 



Election, November 8, 1960. 



COUNTY OF BARNSTABLE. 





^ 


, 




, 










o 


^ 2 


C.w 














- (U 

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Cities and Towns. 


II 


CO Go 

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5|. 


is 


i 

o 


en 

1 


m 
% 




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H 


J 


< 


M 


H 


Barnstable 


5,649 


1,607 


1 


7 


_ 


110 


7.374 


Bourne 






2,082 


689 


5 


4 


— 


52 


2.832 


Brewster . 






634 


109 


1 


2 


— 


11 


807 


Chatham . 






1,726 


225 


1 




- 


25 


1,977 


Dennis 






2,019 


376 


3 


2 


— 


31 


2.431 


Eastham . 






659 


110 


1 


— 




12 


782 


Falmouth . 






3.844 


1,836 


8 


7 


- 


122 


5.817 


Harwich . 






1,947 


355 


1 


4 


— 


44 


2,351 


Mashpee . 






155 


107 


1 


1 


- 


23 


287 


Orleans 






1,305 


176 


— 


— 


— 


40 


1.521 


Provincetown 






1,039 


673 


8 


9 


_ 


54 


1,783 


Sandwich . 






823 


264 




3 


- 


17 


1,107 


Truro 






335 


122 


_ 


2 


— 


14 


473 


VVellfleet . 






628 


140 


2 


3 


— 


12 


785 


Yarmouth 






2,669 


616 


3 


1 


- 


55 


3.344 


Totals 






25,564 


7.405 


35 


45 


- 


622 


33,671 



COUNTY OF BERKSHIRE. 



Adams 


3,048 


3.379 


8 


12 


_ 


183 


6.630 


Alford 






103 


16 


— 


— 


— 


6 


125 


Becket 






242 


124 


_ 


2 


_ 


16 


384 


Cheshire . 






614 


526 


4 


2 


- 


31 


1.177 


Clarksburg 






531 


321 


1 


- 


- 


20 


873 


Dalton 






1,986 


1,201 


3 


4 


— 


30 


3,224 


Egremont 






425 


64 


- 


- 


— 


13 


502 


Florida 






187 


81 


1 


2 


"" 


5 


276 



Vote for Senator in Congress in 1960. 

COUNTY OF BERKSHIRE — Conc/Md«d. 



247 









<«. ^J 












■q 


^'2 


0.2 


"oj 










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^6 


"s 


S 








Cities and Towns. 


II 


OS 

bC 

•.s 


1 










CO 

1 




11 








1 





"3 

1 




^ 


H 


J 


< 


s 


H 


Great Barrington 


2,012 


1,275 4 


! 7 


_ 


107 


3,405 


Hancock . 


173 


35\ 


1 


— 


6 


215 


Hinsdale . 


401 


264 


3 


1 


- 


15 


684 


Lanesborough . 


828 


491 


3 


6 


_ 


28 


1,356 


Lee . 


1.432 


924 


3 


4 


_ 


73 


2,436 


Lenox 


1.308 


747 


3 


3 


- 


41 


2,102 


Monterey- 


198 


68 


1 


i 1 


- 


9 


277 


Mount Washington . 


26 


9 


- 


— 


- 


— 


35 


New Ashford 


49 


25 




' — 


— 


2 


76 


New Marlborougli 


397 


85 


- 


' 3 


- 


11 


496 


North Adams . 


5,039 


4,563 


14 


! 10 


— 


235 


9,861 


Otis . . 


179 


59 




1 


- 


19 


258 


Peru 


68 


26 


- 


1 


— 


2 


97 


PlTTSFIELD 


13.484 


11,687 


106 


41 


— 


2,245 


27.563 


Richmond 


339 


96 




- 


- 


5 


440 


Sandisfield 


125 


113 


1 


- 


10 


249 


Savoy 


96 


56 


1 


- 


6 


159 


Sheffield . 


780 


213 


1| 3 


— 


25 


1.022 


Stockbridge 


785 


352 


6| 


- 


30 


1,173 


Tyringham 


89 


29 


_ 


— 


2 


120 


Washington 


81 


37 


- 


- 


8 


126 


West Stockbridge 


377 


247 


5 1 


- 


19 


649 


Williamstown . 


2,272 


97; 


3 2 


- 


61 


3.313 


Windsor . 


118 


51 


1 1 


- 


6 


177 


Totals 


37.792 


28,13c 


171 10? 


- 


4,011 


70,222 



COUNTY OF BRISTOL. 



Acushnet . 


1,386 


1.253 


5 


5 


_ 


57 


2,706 


Attleboro 






7,269 


5,156 


27 


15 


— 


249 


12,716 


Berkley . 






464 


278 


2 


— 




16 


760 


Dartmouth 






4.636 


2.741 


24 


11 


- 


163 


7.575 


Dighton . 






1.046 


672 


- 


2 


— 


30 


1.750 


Easton 






3,166 


1.265 


2 


4 


— 


38 


4.475 


Fairhaven 






4,434 


3.006 


13 


10 


- 


123 


7,586 


Fall River 






15,878 


31,732 


117 


103 


— 


1,897 


49,727 


Freetown . 






900 


476 


2 


1 


— 


26 


1,405 


Mansfield 






2.391 


1.547 


8 


4 


~ 


68 


4,018 



248 Vote for Senator in Congress in 1960. 

COUNTY OF BRISTOL — Conc/Mde J, 







. 


^ 


, 










o 


C o 


C M 


"oj 








Cities and Towns. 


11 


oQ 
§2 

of 

m C, o 


C3 




O 


C 


1 
1 

o 




J 


H 


-J 


< 


« 


H 


New Bedford . 


25,178 


24,727 


151 


105 


_ 


1,490 


51,651 


North Attleborough 




4,080 


2,917 


8 


7 


- 


182 


7,194 


Norton 




1.723 


992 


3 


3 


— 


58 


2,779 


Raynham . 






1,356 


667 


3 


30 


- 


29 


2,085 


Rehoboth . 






1,456 


775 


4 


1 


— 


62 


2,298 


Seekonk . 






2,297 


1,573 


4 


11 


— 


102 


3,987 


Somerset , 






3,009 


3,327 


13 


3 


- 


101 


6,453 


Swansea . 






2,555 


2.478 


8 


5 


- 


87 


5.133 


Taunton , 






8,288 


9,912 


20 


38 


- 


695 


18.953 


Westport . 






1.954 


1,462 


7 


9 


- 


63 


3.495 


Totals 


93,466 


96,956 


421 


367 


- 


5.536 


196.746 



COUNTY 


OF DUKES COUNTY. 






Chilmark . 


158 


9 




1 


_ 


1 


169 


Edgartown 


658 


129 


1 


- 


_ 


21 


809 


Gay Head 


32 


12 




1 


- 


6 


51 


Gosnold . 


37 


8 


- 


- 


- 


1 


46 


Oak Bluffs 


579 


221 


1 


4 


- 


35 


840 


Tisbury . 


849 


317 


1 


2 


— 


22 


1,191 


West Tisbury . 


199 


24 


" 


- 


- 


3 


226 


Totals 


2,512 


720 


3 


8 


- 


89 


3.332 



COUNTY OF ESSEX. 



Amesbury 
Andover . 
Beverly . 
Boxford 
Danvers . 
Essex 

Georgetown 
Gloucester 
Groveland 
Hamilton . 



3.052 

6,878 

11,727 

952 
6.272 

916 
1,473 
7,721 
1.126 
2.132 



2,503 


14 


6 


_ 


121 


2,338 


8 


6 


- 


106 


6,147 


21 


11 


- 


236 


129 


- 


3 


- 


2 


3,506 


10 


2 


_ 


124 


271 


1 


1 


- 


19 


374 


1 


— 


- 


30 


4.801 


15 


10 


- 


334 


476 


2 


4 


- 


15 


618 


2 


1 


~ 


19 



Vote for Senator in Congress in 1960. 

COUNTY OF ESSEX — Conc/wded. 



249 





^ 


, 


Vw ^J 


1 










o 


•^2 


C.W 


-5 










— c 


. - 4) 


^..2 


^ 










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II 


o§ 








Cities and Towns. 


11 


o-o 

O M 


5| 


73 •§ 






2 




la 


■ c 

H- 5-- 

m Co 

2 o o 


m 


2 
!3S 


1 

o 


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C 






J 


H 


J 


S 


< 


s 


H . 


Haverhill 


11,262 


11,220 


53 


37 


_ 


572 


23.144 


Ipswich . 






3,091 


1,515 


3 


1 


— 


70 


4,680 


Lawrence 






15,527 


21,025 


154 


61 


- 


1,022 


37.789 


Lynn 






23,857 


23,350 


143 


46 


— 


942 


48.338 


Lynnfield . 






3,650 


861 


- 


4 


- 


36 


4,551 


Manchester 






1,710 


462 


1 


1 


— 


34 


2,208 


Marblehead 






8,699 


2,002 


13 


8 


- 


75 


10,797 


Merrimac 






1,151 


499 


3 


4 


_ 


27 


1,684 


Methuen . 






8,639 


6,076 


44 


24 


- 


309 


15,092 


Middleton 






1,063 


468 


3 


31 


35 


1.572 


Nahant 






1,232 


683 


1 


_! 


23 


1,939 


Newbury . 






1.233 


351 


- 


2 


- 


10 


1,596 


Newburyport 






4,253 


3,041 


10 


9 


- 


236 


7.549 


North Andover 






3,915 


2,031 


17 


8 


— 


93 


6.064 


Peabody . 






7,836 


8.498 


44 


28 


- 


431 


16,387 


Rockport , 






2,115 


638 


7 


5 


— 


38 


2,803 


Rowley 






984 


289 


- 


2 


— 


21 


1,296 


Salem 






8,788 


12,019 


30 


25 


_ 


465 


21,327 


Salisbury . 






1.252 


550 


5 


3 


- 


46 


1,856 


Saugus 






6,795 


3.406 


34 


17 


- 


127 


10,379 


Swampscott 






5,678 


2,087 


8 


2 


- 


73 


7,848 


Topsfield . 






1.425 


217 


1 


1 


- 


10 


1,654 


Wen ham . 






1,233 


169 


2 


— 


- 


8 


1.412 


West Newbury 






752 


193 


2 


2 


- 


9 


958 


Totals 






168,389 


122,813 


652 


337 


- 


5,718 


297.909 



COUNTY OF FRANKLIN. 



Ashfield . 


483 


68 


2 


1 




10 


564 


Bernardston 






544 


87 






- 


14 


645 


Buckland . 






721 


168 


— 


1 


- 


20 


910 


Charlemont 






380 


61 




1 


— 


6 


448 


Colrain 






518 


179 






- 


19 


716 


Conway . 






333 


105 


1 


— 


- 


5 


444 


Deerfield . 






980 


640 




4 


— 


39 


1.663 


Erving 






397 


233 


3 




- 


24 


657 


Gill 






432 


145 


2 


— 


- 


7 


• 586 


Greenfield 






5.729 


3.404 


11 


17 


- 


122 


9.283 


Hawley . 






86 


12 


~ 


1 




1 


100 



250 Vote for Senator in Congress in I960, 

COUNTY OF FRANKLIN — Co«cZ«ded. 





^ 




^ *j 


, 










o 


u 6 


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i> 














rt 


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Cities A^fD Towns. 


11 






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1:1 

55| 






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O 


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J 


H 


J 


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PQ 


H 


Heath 


126 


26 


_ 


2 


_ 


2 


156 


Leverett . 






300 


72 


1 


— 


- 


9 


382 


Leydf-n 






101 


51 


- 


- 


- 


2 


15^ 


Monroe 






48 


34 


— 


— 


- 


5 


87 


Montague 






2,174 


2,088 


6 


3 


- 


89 


4,360 


New Salem 






201 


27 


1 




— 


3 


232 


Northfield 






1,007 


147 


— 


3 


— 


17 


1,174 


Orange 






2,163 


716 


2 


2 


- 


51 


2,934 


Rowe 






114 


17 


— 


— 


— 


1 


132 


Shelburne 






868 


136 


1 


1 


— 


21 


1,027 


Shutesbury 






79 


45 






- 


3 


127 


Sunderland 






374 


237 


3 


1 


— 


12 


627 


Warwick . 






206 


36 


_ 


1 


_ 


5 


248 


Wendell . 






89 


55 


1 


- 


- 


3 


148 


Whately . 






297 


212 


2 


- 


- 


11 


522 


Totals 






18,750 


9,001 


36 


38 


- 


501 


28.326 



COUNTY OF HAMPDEN. 



Agawam . 

Blandford 

Brimfield . 

Chester 

Chicopee 

East Longmeadow 

Granville . 

Hampden . 

Holland . 

HOLYOKE . 

Longmeadow 

Ludlow 

Monson 

Montgomery 

Palmer 

Russell 

Southwick 

Springfield 

Tolland 



4,433 

339 

435 

384 

11.067 

3,606 

386 

823 

199 

10.428 

4,889 

2,908 

1,427 

134 

2.609 

394 

1,316 

41,146 

59 



3,312 


14 


5 


_ 


117 


76 


— 


1 


- 


2 


230 


1 


— 


- 


9 


211 


1 


1 


_ 


19 


13,550 


74 


33 


- 


518 


1,486 


15 


2 


— 


125 


82 


3 


4 


_ 


7 


364 


2 


1 


- 


7 


112 


_ 


— 


— 


3 


13,809 


160 


40 


- 


1,952 


1,041 


3 


2 


- 


34 


3,416 


19 


12 


— 


117 


1,063 


3 


3 


- 


47 


34 


2 


— 


— 


3 


2,726 


12 


7 


- 


116 


221 


1 


- 


— 


15 


897 


2 


3 


— 


42 


31,126 


431 


77 


- 


3,264 


11 


~ 


1 




2 



Vote for Senator in Congress in 1960, 

COUNTY OF HAMPDEN — Co«c/Md«(f. 



251 









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Cities and Towns. 


5 = 


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5| 

m 


11 

Pi Oh 


2 

% 

6 


03 


Hi 

1 

OS 

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^ 


H 


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^ 


< 


m 


H 


Wales 


168 


129 


1 


1 




7 


306 


West Springfield 


7.174 


4.881 


16 


6 


- 


167 


12.244 


Westfield 


6.503 


5,291 


19 


14 


— 


229 


12.056 


Wilbraham 


2,713 


1.030 5 


3 


- 


36 


3.787 


Totals 


103.540 


85.098 784 


216 


- 


6,838 


196,476 



COUNTY OF HAMPSHIRE. 



Amherst . 

Belchertown 

Chesterfield 

Curamington 

Easthampton 

Goshen 

Granby 

Hadley . 

Hattield . 

Huntington 

Middleneld 

Northampton 

Pelham 

Plainfield . 

South Hadley 

Southampton 

Ware 

Weschampton 

Williamsburg 

Worthington 

Totals 



3,231! 

1,055 1 
223| 
3061 

2,903 
180 
944 
684 
516 
431 
104 

6,863 
306 
137 

3.6381 
643! 

1.929! 
2181 
7311 
2651 



1,266 

632 

35 

33 

3,307 

27 

664 

733 

621 

274 

31j 

5,820 

89 

17 

2.6541 

396 

2,347 

58 

344 

38l 



16 



25.307 19,386, 



62 



5 


_ 


1 
16 


- 


2 

1 


- 


1 


- 


7 
1 


- 


10 
2 
6 


: 


2 


_ 


- 


- 


56 


- 



67 
26 

6 

6 
135 

2 
15 
54 
48 
15 

1 
208 

5 

3 

74 

11 

124 

4 
15 

7 



826 



COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX. 



Acton 

Arlington 

Ashby 



2.890 639 

16.730 11.009! 

652 229! 



4 


- 


22 


18 


_ 


280 


1 




16 



252 Vote for Senator in Congress in J 960. 

COUNTY OF MIDBLESEX — Continued. 





^^ 


, 


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, 










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Cities and Towns. 


11 


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pa 

o 




^ 


H 


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^ 


< 


5 


H 


Ashland . 


2,224 


1,248 


4 


4 


_ 


32 


3,5.2 


Ayer 






1,066 


667 


2 


3 


— 


40 


1.778 


Bedford , 






2,648 


987 


6 


5 


- 


33 


3.679 


Belmont . 






11,603 


5.125 


17 


9 


- 


199 


16.953 


Billerica . 






4,114 


3.278 


17 


6 


- 


66 


7,481 


Boxborough 






309 


59 


- 


- 


- 


2 


370 


Burlington 






3,352 


2.192 


9 


6 


— 


67 


5,626 


Cambridge 






22,135 


25,100 


95 


40 


- 


1.058 


48,428 


Carlisle . 






619 


86 


1 


- 


- 


6 


712 


Chelmsford 






5,016 


2.711 


6 


4 


- 


73 


7.810 


Concord . 






4.637 


1,587 


1 


1 


- 


66 


6.292 


Dracut 






3.227 


3,243 


18 


14 


- 


131 


6,633 


Dunstable 






306 


89 


1 


2 


- 


4 


402 


Everett . 






10,182 


10,140 


151 


37 


- 


2.055 


22,565 


Framingham 






12.561 


8,258 


43 


9 


- 


267 


21,138 


Groton 






1.384 


476 


2 


4 


— 


21 


1.887 


Holliston . 






2,163 


787 


2 


5 


- 


26 


2.983 


Hopkinton 






1.590 


803 


8 


- 


- 


15 


2.416 


Hudson 






2.514 


2,345 


9 


2 


— 


80 


4.950 


Lexington 






9.155 


3,329 


63 


17 


- 


587 


13.151 


Lincoln 






1,633 


401 


4 


3 


- 


21 


2.062 


Littleton . 






1,556 


606 


5 


3 


- 


20 


2.190 


Lowell . 






18.757 


27.153 


95 


68 


- 


1,057 


47.130 


Malden . 






16,256 


13,580 


50 


43 


- 


699 


30,628 


Marlborough 






4,686 


5,123 


10 


7 


— 


171 


9.997 


Maynard 






2,010 


1,795 


10 


4 


- 


79 


3.898 


Medford 






18,004 


15.554 


69 


44 


— 


664 


34,335 


Melrose 






12,084 


4,119 


11 


38 


- 


173 


16,425 


Natick 






8,917 


4.730 


12 


6 


- 


143 


13.808 


Newton . 






33,214 


14,564 


75 


30 


1 


571 


48.455 


North Reading 






2,646 


1,244 


3 


4 


- 


33 


3.930 


Pepperell . 






1,182 


591 


4 


2 


— 


33 


1.812 


Reading . 






7,600 


2,238 


5 


10 


— 


82 


9.935 


Sherborn . 






873 


143 


1 


- 


- 


5 


1.022 


Shirley . 






728 


543 


1 


- 


- 


25 


1.297 


SOMERVILLE 






19,568 


24,778 


100 


41 


- 


892 


45,379 


Stoneham 






5,552 


3,236 


8 


10 


— 


97 


8,903 


Stow 






1,016 


270 


3 


1 


_ 


19 


1,309 


Sudbury . 






2,646 


817 


5 


5 


- 


24 


3,497 


Tewksbury 






3.352 


2.667 


6 


2 


- 


66 


6.093 


Townsend 






1,271 


488 


5 


~ 


~ 


22 


1,786 



Vote for Senator in Congress in 1960. 

COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX — CondMded. 



253 





^ 






^ 










o 


u 6 


o 2 












— r- 




u, '^ 


^ 










II 


OP 


II 


•SS 








Cities and Towns. 


It 


5? 






O, 
< 


c 
29 


i2 


Tyrgsborough . 


888 


642 


5 


4 


_ 


29 


1,568 


Wakefield 






8.168 


4,339 


8 


14 


— 


179 


12,708 


Waltham 






13.066 


9,926 


137 


33 


— 


2,021 


25,183 


Waienown 






11.332 


8,620 


99 


10 


1 


383 


20,445 


\Va\'land . 






3.843 


1,172 


7 


1 


— 


38 


5,061 


Westrord . 






1.792 


1.279 


4 


2 


- 


39 


3,116 


Weston 






3.550 


716 


5 


2 


— 


18 


4,291 


\\ ilmiiigton 






3.252 


1,997 


5 


7 


- 


45 


5,306 


Winchester 






7,573 


3,095 


11 


4 


- 


127 


10,810 


WCBURN . 






7,356 


7,808 


20 


30 


- 


225 


15,439 


Totals 






345,448 


248,621 


1,283 


619 


2 


13,146 


609,119 



COUNTY OF NANTUCKET. 



1,511 



360 



COUNTY OF NORFOLK. 



61 



1.939 



Avon 


1,196 


831 


1 


_ 


_ 


2P 


2.057 


Bellingham 






1,273 


1,880 


11 


7 


- 


68 


3,239 


Braintree . 






10,314 


5,412 


13 


13 


— 


109 


15.861 


Brookline . 






20,178 


9,741 


152 


31 


— 


1.560 


31.662 


Canton 






3,747 


2.491 


6 


4 


- 


70 


6.318 


Cohasset . 






2,346 


765 


1 


- 


— 


47 


3.159 


Dedham . 






7,496 


4.649 


26 


7 


— 


162 


12.340 


Dover 






1,458 


214 


2 


- 


- 


11 


1.685 


Foxborough 






2.929 


1,222 


6 


6 


— 


37 


4.200 


Franklin . 






2.317 


2,418 


7 


9 


_ 


96 


4,847 


Holbrook . 






2.993 


1,545 


3 


1 


- 


54 


4.596 


Medfield . 






1,731 


628 


3 


2 


_ 


28 


2.392 


Medway . 






1,533 


1.003 


4 


4 


- 


36 


2.580 


Millis 






1.399 


664 


3 


— 


— 


26 


2.092 


Milton 






10,135 


5.210 


11 


4 


— 


150 


15.510 


Needham . 






11,390 


2.680 


18 


8 


- 


109 


14,205 


Norfolk . 






812 


412 


5 


2 


— 


10 


1.241 


Norwood . 






6,358 


5.951 


9 


4 


~ 


159 


12.481 



254 Vote for Senator in Congress in 1960. 

COUNTY OF NORFOLK — Cowdwded. 





<*. 


. , 


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s c 


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Cities and Towns. 


ll 


<S1 


^1 


11 






2. 




11 




113 


c5 


2 
O 








J 


H 


J 


:§ 


< 


oa 


H 


Plainville . 


1.167 


544 


2J 2 


. 


23 


1.738 


QUINCY 






27.184 


17,601 


95, 34 


- 


651 


45.565 


Randolph 






4,854 


3.953 


111 2 


- 


97 


8,917 


Sharon 






3.185 


1.643 


8 3 


— 


19 


4,858 


Stoughton 






4.323 


3.204 


9 5 


- 


97 


7.638 


VValpole . 






4,116 


2,527 


4 6 


- 


77 


6.730 


VVellesley . 






10,665 


2.404 


12 7 


— 


110 


13.198 


Westwood 






4,335 


1.277 


5 2 


— 


22 


5,641 


Weymouth 






14,044 


8.317 


23 9 


- 


176| 


22,569 


VVrentham 






1,568 


608 


3 


2 


- 


30 


2,211 


Totals 






165,046 


89,794 


453 


174 


- 


4,063 


259,530 



COUNTY OF PLYMOUTH. 



Abington . 


3.326 


1.700 


6 


8 


_ 


58 


5,098 


Bridgewater 






2.235 


1,412 


8 


6 


— 


103 


3,764 


Brockton 






19.382 


14.533 


76 


38 


— 


710 


34,739 


Carver 






526 


206 


3 




_ 


29 


764 


Duxbury . 






2.239 


345 


3 


2 


_ 


28 


2,617 


East Bridgewate 


T 




2.035 


749 


4 


3 


- 


40 


2,831 


Halifax . 






585 


268 


1 


1 


— 


10 


865 


Hanover . 






2.065 


711 


4 


2 


— 


19 


2,801 


Hanson 






1.407 


494 


1 


6 


— 


31 


1.939 


Hingham . 






5,741 


1.892 


5 


5 


- 


55 


7,698 


Hull 






2.003 


1,542 


5 


1 


_ 


74 


3,625 


Kingston . 






1,426 


741 


7 


3 


- 


56 


2.233 


Lakeville . 






1,113 


387 


1 


2 


— 


37 


1.540 


Marion 






1,182 


270 




4 


— 


29 


1,485 


Marshfield 






2,548 


1,040 




4 


- 


28 


3,620 


Mattapoisett 






1,262 


390 


1 


1 


— 


24 


1.678 


Middleborough 






3,594 


1,513 


4 


6 


- 


88 


5,205 


Norwell . 






2,015 


582 


3 


3 


— 


18 


2.621 


Pembroke 






1,748 


588 


3 


2 


— 


26 


2,367 


Plymouth 






4,601 


2.692 


7 


2 


- 


202 


7,504 


Plympton 






313 


70 


- 


- 


- 


4 


387 


Rochester 






551 


133 


1 


1 


- 


4 


690 


Rockland . 






3,466 


2,506 


1 


4 


_ 


69 


6,046 


Scituate . 






3,996 


1,570 


5 


2 


~ 


48 


5,621 



Vote for Senator in Congress in 1960. 

COUNTY OF PLYMOUTH — CondMded. 



255 





v« 


-"2 




, 










o 


O.S2 


a; 








Cities and Towns. 


11 


Si 

CO C. o 
cdc/3-- 

S a 


1 


1^ 

a 


to 

< 


en 

5 


2 

;2 


Wareham . 


2,658 


,,u, 


4 


3 


_ 


140 


3,946 


West Bridgewater 


1,920 


610 


3 


5 


— 


37 


2.575 


Whitman . 


3,478 


1,641 


9 


2 


- 


58 


5.188 


Totals 


77,415 


39,726 


165 


116 


- 


2.025 


119,447 





COUNTY OF 


SUFFOLK. 








Boston . 
Chelsea . 
Revere . 
Winthrop . 


117,223 
5.846 
9.066 
6,407 


150.563 

9,227 

10.592 

4,073 


1,103 
45 
55 
19 


356 

35 

28 

5 


1 


28,448 
655 
623 
120 


297.694 
15,808 
20.364 
10,624 


Totals 


138.542 


174,455 


1,222 


424 


1 


29,846 


344,490 



COUNTY OF WORCESTER. 



Ashburnham 


837 


542 


38 






36 


1.453 


Athol 






3.755 


2.125 


7 


4 


- 


107 


5,998 


Auburn 






4,421 


2.570 


10 


5 


— 


52 


7,058 


Barre 






1,026 


731 


1 


1 


- 


48 


1,807 


Berlin 






676 


166 




— 


— 


9 


851 


Blackstone 






739 


1,729 


3 


2 


_ 


46 


2,519 


Bolton 






515 


119 


1 




- 


8 


643 


Boylston . 






913 


315 


— 


1 


— 


12 


1,241 


Brookfield 






626 


248 


2 




_ 


12 


888 


Charlton . 






1,027 


593 


3 


2 


- 


29 


1.654 


Clinton 






3,134 


3.365 


12 


8 


- 


151 


6,670 


Douglas . 






816 


629 


3 


2 


- 


35 


1.485 


Dudley 






1.415 


1,709 


9 


5 


- 


66 


3,204 


East Brookfield 






491 


264 


1 




_ 


15 


771 


Fitchburg 






9.950 


10,558 


25 


25 


- 


477 


21,035 


Gardner . 






4,479 


4,810 


14 


9 


_ 


242 


9.554 


Grafton . 






2,524 


1,913 


3 


3 


- 


50 


4,493 


Hardwick 






563 


588 


2 


2 




36 


1,191 


Harvard . 






846 


174 


_ 


— 


— 


4 


1,024 


Holden , 






4,418 


978 


8 


4 


_ 


43 


5,451 


Hopedale . 






1,534 


720 


1 


3 


' 


28 


2,286 



256 Vote for Senator in Congress in 1960. 

COUNTY OF WORCESTER — Concluded. 





'o 


c 2 


°.2 


"w 










_ ^ 


•— ' 6 


^"ri 


S 










II 


c 


11 


■^g 








Cities and Towns. 


1 = 


§2" 

O M 


■2i 
o 


in o 


0} 




_o 








4)^ 


Mi 

!3£ 


6 








J 


H 


J 


S 


< 


5 


H 


Hubbardston 


432 


164 


5 


_ 


_ 


13 


614 


Lancaster 






1.477 


455 


1 


11 


— 


49 


1.993 


Leicester . 






2.029 


1,735 


'5 


4 


- 


55 


3,828 


Leominster 






6,899 


6,427 


12 


14 


— 


289 


13,641 


Lunenburg 






2,080 


1,000 


6 


2 


- 


46 


3,134 


Mendon . 






759 


311 


2 


3 


— 


17 


1,092 


Milford . 






3,714 


4,677 


6 


6 


— 


217 


8,620 


Millbury . 






2,432 


2,443 


10 


5 


- 


56 


4.946 


Millville . 






314 


505 


1 


— 


— 


17 


837 


Nev/ Braintree 






163 


55 


- 


— 


— 


1 


219 


North Brookfielc 






1,024 


817 


- 


1 


- 


27 


1.869 


Northborough 






2,367 


839 


2 


- 




24 


3,232 


Northbridge 






2,994 


2,754 


6 


4 


— 


75 


5.833 


Oakham . 






204 


78 


- 


- 


_ 


4 


286 


Oxford 






2,208 


1,786 


6 


2 


— 


60 


4,062 


Paxton 






959 


288 


1 


- 


- 


8 


1,256 


Petersham 






346 


90 


— 


— 


— 


5 


441 


PhilUpston 






238 


99 


1 


1 


_ 


1 


340 


Princeton . 






588 


98 




1 


- 


8 


695 


Royalston 






201 


152 


1 


1 


— 


1 


356 


Rutland . 






821 


326 


3 


2 


— 


17 


1,169 


S hrewsbury 






5,454 


2,719 


12 


5 


- 


86 


8.276 


Southborough 






1,382 


599 


3 


3 


- 


20 


2.007 


Southbridge 






3,746 


5,109 


10 


9 


— 


253 


9.127 


Spencer . 






2,056 


1,946 


5 


4 


— 


82 


4.093 


Sterling 






1,308 


323 


2 


2 


- 


21 


1,656 


Sturbridge 






989 


818 


2 


2 


- 


30 


1,841 


Sutton 






1.136 


623 


1 


5 


— 


18 


1,783 


Templeton 






1,359 


933 


4 


3 


- 


36 


2,335 


Upton 






1,103 


459 


1 


2 


— 


18 


1,583 


Uxbridge . 






1,772 


2,129 


3 


2 


- 


70 


3.976 


Warren 






896 


859 


1 


4 


— 


38 


1.798 


Webster . 






3,332 


4,025 


12 


8 


- 


159 


7,536 


West Boylston 






1.927 


704 


2 


- 


- 


17 


2,650 


West Brookfield 






749 


321 


2 


- 


- 


9 


1,081 


Westborough 






2,672 


962 


4 


5 


— 


31 


3.674 


Westminster 






1,200 


594 


4 


- 


— 


48 


1.846 


Winchendon 






1,449 


1.529 


4 


4 


- 


53 


3,039 


Worcester 






45,790 


43.654 


164 


88 


- 


1.666 


91.362 


Totals 


155,274 


128.251 


447 


279 


- 


5.151 


289.402 



Vote for Senator in Congress in 1960. 

AGGREGATE OF VOTES FOR SENATOR. 



257 





^ 


. 


^ 


__!_ 








c 


^ o 


O.M 


"3 










Is 


c . 


1^' 












11 


c52 


OJ 


&.5 








Counties. 




b% 

. c 


3| 


1 

32 


2 

6 


K 
^ 

rt 


H 
o 




J 


H 


J 


S 


< 


5 


e- 


Barnstable 


25,564 


7.405 


35 


45 




622 


33,671 


Berkshire 


37.792 


28,139 


171 


109 


- 


3,269 


69.480 


Bristol 


93.466 


96,956 


421 


367 


- 


5,536 


196,746 


Dukes County . 


2.512 


720 


3 


8 


- 


89 


3,332 


Essex 


168,389 


122.813 


652 


337 


- 


5.718 


297,909 


Franklin . 


18,750 


9.001 


36 


38 


- 


501 


28,326 


Hampden . 


103.540 


85,098 


784 


216 


- 


6,838 


196,476 


Hampshire 


25,307 


19,386 


62 


56 


- 


826 


45.637 


Middlesex 


345,448 


248.621 


1.283 


619 


2 


13,146 


609.119 


Nantucket 


1.511 


360 


1 


6 


- 


61 


1,939 


Norfolk . 


165,046 


89.794 


453 


174 


- 


4,063 


259,530 


Plymouth . 


77,415 


39,726 


165 


116 


- 


2,025 


119,447 


Suffolk 


138,542 


174,455 


1.222 


424 


1 


29,846 


344,490 


Worcester 


155,274 


128.251 


447 


279 


- 


5,151 


289,402 


Totals . 


1.358,556 


1.050.725 


5.735 


2,794 


3 


77,691 


2,495.504 



258 Vote for Senator in Congress in 1962. 

{To fill vacancy) 

VOTE FOR SENATOR IN CONGRESS IN 1962. 

(BY COUNTIES.) 



Election, November 


6, 1962. 
5TABLE. 


1 


COUNTY OF BARNS 






>*; 


, 


W- .tJ 


CO I 


, 










O 




O.M 


<u <u 


'S 
















jstj 










>>.y 


OQ 


^15 


M C 


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Cities and Towns. 


"1 

s . 


21 

, • 4) 


o 1 


12 
11^ 






03 

o 




-1 

1" 




O !-■ 1_ 
C 4) o 






6 
< 


5 




Barnstable 


2,082 


4,235 


3 


123 


2 




76 


6,521 


Bourne . 






903 


1,273 


1 


32 





— 


13 


2,222 


Brewster 






140 


542 


1 


23 





- 


8 


71-^ 


Chatham 






343 


1,333 





28 


1 


— 


24 


1,72S 


Dennis . 






535 


1,616 


1 


47 


3 


- 


21 


2,22: 


Eastham 






145 


531 


1 


12 





— 


19 


lOi 


Falmouth 






1,953 


2,589 


7 


218 


5 


— 


67 


4,83? 


Harwich . 






537 


1,553 


7 


45 


6 


- 


26 


2,17^ 


Mashpee 






139 


85 





1 





- 


5 


23( 


Orleans . 






250 


1,030 


1 


42 


1 


— 


18 


1,34: 


Provincetown 






837 


407 


10 


63 


1 


- 


16 


1,33^ 


Sandwich 






331 


577 


1 


18 


1 


_ 


10 


93i 


Truro . 






148 


224 





13 


1 


- 


7 


39- 


Wellfieet 






185 


441 





27 





— 


9 


66: 


Yarmouth 






915 


2,083 


2 


55 





- 


28 


3,08- 


Totals 


9,443 


18,519 


35 


747 


21 


- 


347 


29.li: 


cour 


^TY OF BERKSHIRE. 




Adams . 


3,721 


1,664 


6 


88 


1 


_ 


87 


5,56' 


Alford . 






27 


72 





3 





- 




10' 


Becket . 






108 


188 





11 





- 




31( 


Cheshire. 






526 


404 


1 


13 


1 


— 




95: 


Clarksburg 






304 


382 





8 


3 


- 


14 


71 


Dalton . 






1,230 


1,464 


2 


85 


2 


— 




2,79t 


Egremont 






80 


306 





19 





- 




40' 


Florida . 






99 


H, 





4 





" 




25' 



Vote for Senator in Congress in 1962. 



259 



COUNTY OF BERKSHIRE — Condwded. 









t4_ «J 


CO 1 












"o 


i 


°| 


.s-s 


13 












M 






S 






. 




i 


on 














Cities and Towns. 


y 




5| 


•a 
^1 






i2 
o 




s - 


• a; 


<ii ° 


3 S-^ 


to 




;^ 




c 

T3 O 




iSs 


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pi Oh 




CO 


"3 




^1 


o 


u^^ 

f' 


c 

. O Q 




o 

< 


5 


1 


Great Barrington 


1,407 


1,299 


4 


89 


2 


_ 


44 


2,845 


Hancock 


50 


123 





11 





— 


5 


189 


Hinsdale 


290 


250 





11 


o; - 


4 


555 


Lanesborough . 


502 


566 





42 


3 


- 


11 


1,124 


Lee ... 


1,074 


941 


1 


62 


1 


— 


31 


2,110 


Lenox 


789 


913 





81 


2 


— 


24 


1,809 


Monterey 


53 


153 





33 





- 


3 


242 


Mount Washington . 


3 


27 





2 





- 


2 


34 


New Ashford . 


32 


36 


1 


1 





— 





70 


New Marlborough . 


63 


250 





10 





- 


9 


332 


North Adams 


4,958 


2,923 


3 


100 


5 


— 


136 


8,125 


Otis 


47 


122 





2 





- 


12 


183 


Peru 


26 


49 











— 





75 


PiTTSFIELD 


11,995 


9,625 


157 


732 


23 


- 


1,633 


24,165 


Richmond 


132 


281 


1 


17 





_ 


2 


433 


Sandisfield 


86 


92 


3 


1 


3 


- 


3 


188 


Savoy 


61 


78 





1 





~ 


3 


143 


Sheffield . 


189 


560 





37 





~ 


12 


798 


Stockbridge . 


304 


556 


3 


136 


1 




5 


1,005 


Tyringham 


36 


55 





10 





- 


11 


112 


Washington 


43 


49 





3 


2 


— 





97 


West Stockbridge 


234 


280 





18 





- 


11 


543 


Williamstown . 


884 


1,640 


5 


167 


1 


— 


48 


2,745 


Windsor . 


43 


93 





6 





- 


2 


144 


Totals 


29,396 


25.590 


187 


1,803 


50 


- 


2,139 


59.165 



COUNTY OF BRISTOL, 



Acushnet 


1.821 


657 


3 


22 




_ 


17 


2.520 


Attleboro 






4.719 


5,173 


14 


129 


6 


- 


126 


10,167 


Berkley . 






279 


315 


— 


14 


2 


- 


5 


615 


Dartmouth 






3,686 


2.961 


7 


72 


3 


- 


78 


6,807 


Dighton . 






737 


687 


- 


22 


— 


- 


7 


1,453 


Easton . 






1.411 


2,355 


2 


52 


1 


— 


34 


3,855 


Fairhaven 






3,743 


2,398 


- 


69 


3 


- 


49 


6,262 


Fall River 






32,908 


9.419 


50 


460 


28 


_ 


660 


43,525 


Freetown 






554 


616 


2 


9 


— 


_ 


15 


1,196 


Mansfield 






1,571 


1.621 


3 


53 


5 




49 


3,302 



260 Vote for Senator in Congress in 1962. 

COUNTY OF BRISTOL — Conc/wrfet/. 





^ 


, 




CO 1 


, 












> 






cu 












•V 




JZ'O 








• 




« 


C3 


M C 


% 










1% 






"§i 










Cities and Towns. 


■1 


Fi 


5i 








1 






















c 






^c3^ 


d^ 


^ 




a 

a 






Georg 
erly 




c 

. O G 


1^' 


6 

< 


c 
a 

s 


1 


New Bedford 


31,171 


11,768 


43 


479 


52 


2 


479 


43,992 


North Attleborough 




2,838 


2,854 


/ 


62 


5 


- 


51 


5.817 


Norton . 




903 


1.188 


2 


58 


3 


— 


12 


2,166 


Raynham 






847 


1,099 


2 


39 


1 


- 


29 


2,017 


Rehoboth 






749 


1,128 


1 


27 


— 


— 


28 


1,933 


Seekonk . 






1,556 


1,817 


4 


56 


1 


- 


68 


3,502 


Somerset 






3,638 


2,068 


3 


80 


2 


- 


36 


5,827 


Swansea . 






2,641 


1,824 


3 


48 


1 


- 


41 


4,558 


Taunton 






10,337 


5.064 


9 


289 


13 


- 


257 


15,969 


Westport 






1.634 


1,413 


3 


22 


2 


- 


30 


3,104 


Totals 






107,743 


56,425 


158 


2,062 


128 


2 


2,071 


168,589 









COUNTY OF DUKES 


COUNTY. 








Chilmark 


17 


109 


1 


6 







1 


134 


Edgartown 






215 


467 





15 


1 


- 


11 


709 


Gay Head 






24 


22 











- 


2 


48 


Gosnold . 






6 


36 











- 


1 


43 


Oak Bluffs 






319 


333 


2 


5 


4 


- 


19 


682 


Tisbury . 






479 


557 





16 


1 


- 


21 


1,074 


West Tisbury 






34 


144 





13 





- 


4 


195 


Totals 






1,094 


1,668 


3 


55 


6 


- 


59 


2,885 





COUNTY 


OF ESSEX. 










Amesbury 


2,576 


1,998 


3 


71 





_ 


44 


4,692 


Andover . 


2,898 


5,383 


3 


162 


3 


- 


78 


8,527 


Beverly 


6,333 


9,116 


15 


209 


3 


- 


178 


15,854 


B oxford . 


166 


916 


2 


29 





— 


4 


1,117 


Danvers . 


3.929 


4,868 


3 


138 


10 


— 


62 


9,010 


Essex 


278 


693 





19 





1 


13 


1.004 


Georgetown 


446 


1,158 


1 


"^0 





- 


13 


1,658 


Gloucester . 


5,197 


5,278 


7 


184 


4 


- 


155 


10,825 


Groveland 


549 


925 


2 


35 


1 


- 


5 


1,517 


Hamilton 


619 


1,778 


1 


62 





' 


21 


2,481 



Vote for Senator in Congress in 1962. 

COUNTY OF KSS^^ ~ Concluded. 



261 





^ 








, 










o 


> 


O.ra 


l-s 


"cj 










>>/:! 


S 


II 


M S 


^ 










1! 


"o c 


x" 

i 










Cities and Towns. 




5| 








to 

o 




<5 - 


• 1) 


«, o 


3 S-fi 












n 
T! o 





0) *J 


c 


1^ 


o 

< 


n 

3 


o 


Haverhil 


11,065 


7,967 


16 


371 


16 




280 


19,715 


Ipswich . 






1,536 


2,261 


3 


77 





- 


35 


3,912 


Lawrence 






25,409 


6,740 


56 


415 


29 


— 


544 


33.193 


Lynn 






25,449 


14,222 


50 


928 


22 


- 


447 


41,118 


Lynnfield 






1,120 


2,988 


2 


69 





— 


25 


4,204 


Manchester 






519 


1,456 





31 


1 


- 


19 


2,026 


Marblehead 






2,206 


6,910 


10 


326 


4 


- 


60 


9,516 


Merrimac 






543 


889 


1 


22 


1 


_ 


15 


1,471 


MeLhuen 






7,947 


5,370 


6 


219 


6 


- 


133 


13,688 


Middleton 






456 


751 





22 





_ 


23 


1,252 


Nahant . 






795 


862 


2 


58 


1 


- 


14 


1,732 


Newbury 






395 


1,005 


1 


36 


2 


— 


14 


1,453 


Newburyport 




3,380 


3,113 


4 


62 


4 


- 


107 


6,670 


North Andover 




2,707 


2,678 





84 


3 


— 


54 


5,526 


Peabody 




9,476 


5,631 


25 


408 


17 


- 


221 


15,778 


Rockport 






736 


1,739 


6 


118 


1 


— 


23 


2,623 


Rowley . 






308 


765 





13 





— 


14 


1,100 


Salem 






13,082 


5,203 


10 


264 


10 


- 


203 


18,772 


Salisbury 






607 


920 


1 


21 


1 


— 


17 


1,567 


Saugus . 






4.183 


4,521 


18 


204 


8 


- 


66 


9,000 


Swampscott 






2,294 


3,711 


14 


227 


3 


— 


257 


6.506 


Topsfield 






285 


1,283 


4 


30 


1 


- 


6 


1.609 


Wenham 






201 


1,090 


1 


13 





— 


16 


1,321 


West Newbury 




205 


621 


1 


21 





- 


5 


853 


Totals 


137.895 


114,809 


268 


4,988 


151 


1 


3,171 


261,283 









COUNTY OF 


FR.\NKLIN 


. 








Ashfield . 


60 


3S5 





21 







7 


473 


Bernardston 






105 


381 


1 


6 





_ 





493 


Buckland 






195 


487 





15 





- 


14 


711 


Charlemont 






68 


294 





7 





_ 


7 


376 


Colrain . 






162 


347 


3 


6 





- 


6 


524 


Conwav . 






87 


251 





/ 





- 


5 


350 


Deerfield 






648 


661 


1 


32 


1 


- 


18 


1,361 


Erving . 






264 


267 





5 





— 


5 


541 


Gill 






141 


272 


1 


22 





— 


9 


445 


Greenfield 






3,420 


4,075 


6 


177 


16 


- 


99 


7,793 


Hawley . 






11 


67 


» 


1 


1 


~ 


2 


82 



262 



Vote for Senator in Congress in 1962. 



COUNTY OF FRANKLIN — ConcZMdci. 



Cities and Towns. 


i 

-o o 
W 


> 

si 

n 


is 

if. 

113 


Si 

3'-i 




6 

< 


c 

3 


:2 
2 


Heath . 
Leverett . 
Leyden . 
Monroe . 
Montague 
New Salem 
Northfield 
Orange . 
Rowe 
Shelburne 
Shutesbury 
Sunderland 
Warwick 
Wendell . 
Whately . 






22 
44 
39 
43 
2,179 
41 

182 

799 
26 

143 
48 

214 
40 
35 

195 


95 
220 

83 

28 
1,343 
141 
710 
1.438 
106 
641 

63 
268 
146 

67 
203 




1 





1 
1 

2 
1 



1 






3 

22 

2 



50 

3 

22 

43 

5 

16 
6 
7 
2 
1 
10 







1 



1 



1 









' 


1 



4 

1 

62 
1 

10 

37 
2 

13 
2 

13 
4 
3 

10 


121 

287 

128 

72 

3.635 
187 
926 

2,319 
141 
813 
119 
503 
192 
106 
418 


Totals 


9,211 


13,039 


19 


491 


j.. 


- 


335 


23.116 





COUNTY OF 


HAMPDEN 










Agawam . 


3,502 


2.978 


7 


115 


1 


_ 


82 


6.685 


Blandford 


70 


273 





6 





— 


4 


353 


Brimfield 


220 


337 


1 


8 





— 


1 


573 


Chester . 


166 


232 





4 





_ 


9 


411 


Chicopee 


15,105 


5,524 


21 


357 


11 


- 


294 


21,312 


East Longmeadow . 


1.422 


2,689 


8 


99 


1 


- 


130 


4,349 


Granville 


66 


281 





23 





— 


5 


375 


Hampden 


342 


618 


2 


25 





1 


8 


996 


Holland . 


131 


138 


1 


3 


1 


- 





274 


HOLYOKE 


13,255 


6,130 


345 


363 


26 


- 


1,237 


21,356 


Longmeadow . 


997 


4,081 


16 


194 


2 


1 


52 


5,343 


Ludlow . 


3.918 


1.839 


8 


84 


8 


- 


82 


5,939 


Monson . 


971 


1,045 


1 


30 


2 


— 


17 


2,066 


Montgomery . 


40 


115 





1 





- 





156 


Palmer . 


2,968 


1,644 


5 


54 


3 


- 


62 


4,736 


Russell . 


218 


244 





10 





— 


9 


481 


Southwick 


764 


1,039 


2 


31 





— 


26 


1,862 


Springfield . 


30,351 


22,249 


539 


1,388 


51 


- 


3,437 


58,015 


Tolland . 


15 


50 











~ 





65 



Vote for Senator in Congress in 1962. 



263 



COUNTY OF HAMPDEN — CondMded, 





%- 


, 


t4-< -^ 


0) 1 


, 










o 


















"O *J 




1^ 


3I-' 














o c 

as 




ii 
55 •§ 








Cities and Towns. 


21 






73 









c 
to 


ue4 




a5| 

c 


>- 





c 
ri 






w 





J 


X 


^ 


< 


m 


H 


Wales . 


139 


123 


1 


2 










265 


West Springfield 


4,940 


4,961 


18 


170 


10 


- 


144 


10,243 


Westfield 


5,398 


4,521 


18 


179 


2 


— 


118 


10,236 


Wilbraham 


1,101 


2,208 


3 


74 


1 


- 


36 


3,423 


Totals 


86,099 


63,319 


996 


3,220 


119 


2 


5.759 


159.514 



COUNTY OF HAMPSHIRE. 



Amherst . 

Belchertown 

Chesterfield 

Cummington 

Easthampton 

Goshen . 

Granby . 

Hadley . 

Hatfield . 

Huntington 

Middlefield 

Northampton 

Pel ham . 

Plainfield 

South Hadley 

Southampton 

Ware 

Westhampton 

Williamsburg 

Worthington 

Totals 



962 


2,261 


9 


426 


9 




48 


3,715 


662 


717 


2 


25 


1 


- 


17 


1.424 


52 


179 





4 


2 


— 


9 


246 


37 


235 


2 


15 


2 


- 


3 


294 


3.182 


1,996 


5 


126 


8 


— 


87 


5.404 


29 


154 





4 





— 


3 


190 


696 


688 


1 


32 


3 


- 


10 


1.430 


803 


428 


1 


29 


4 


_ 


27 


1,292 


606 


314 





17 





- 


18 


955 


277 


264 





4 


2 


— 


12 


559 


23 


82 





3 


1 


- 





109 


5.616 


4,471 


36 


398 


6 


— 


155 


10.682 


71 


224 





20 





_ 


8 


323 


24 


86 





1 





- 


3 


114 


2,833 


2.532 


7 


184 


2 


- 


65 


5,623 


367 


497 


1 


20 





- 


6 


891 


2,684 


1,000 





29 


1 


- 


62 


3,776 


55 


168 





7 





— 


5 


235 


351 


525 





29 





- 


19 


924 


44 


202 





2 





- 


4 


252 


19,374 


17,023 


64 


1.375 


41 


- 


561 


38.438 



COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX. 



Acton 

Arlington 

Ashby 



793 

13,046 

280 



2.314 
11,183 

422 



2 


105 


2 - 


30 


27 


625 


10 - 


202 


7 


22 





4 



264 



Vote for Senator in Congress in 1962. 



COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX — Con//nMed. 





'o 


> 


^^ 


Si 


"3 












<u 




Xi'V 












« 


Sl 


-►S 








Cities AND Towns. 




21 


^1 




^ o 






i2 




• <u 


fl,5 


3 S ti 


tH 


2 








c 
•a o 










O 




15 A 

- 




W 


o 


J 


S 


S 


< 


S 


H 


Ashland . 


1,379 


1,519 


1 


62 


4 


_ 


21 


2,986 


Ayer 




771 


646 





13 


1 


— 


21 


1.452 


Bedford . 




1,063 


2,123 


4 


130 


2 


- 


27 


3,349 


Belmont . 




5,877 


8,281 


9 


578 


6 


— 


151 


14,902 


Billerica . 




3,666 


2,749 


10 


115 


3 


- 


67 


6,610 


Boxborough 




71 


259 





14 





— 


8 


352 


Burlington 




2,864 


2,350 


7 


125 


2 


- 


66 


5,414 


Cambridge 




24,288 


12,754 


78 


2,925 


34 


— 


614 


40,693 


Carlisle . 




107 


538 


2 


39 





— 


5 


691 


Chelmsford 




3,291 


4,246 


8 


104 


5 


- 


75 


7.729 


Concord . 




1,686 


3,726 


2 


286 


5 


- 


43 


5,748 


Dracut . 




3,974 


2,104 


8 


79 


2 


1 


56 


6.224 


Dunstable 




93 


223 





14 





— 


4 


334 


Everett 




11,656 


5,589 


212 


292 


22 


— 


1,360 


19,131 


Framingham 




9,075 


8,632 


22 


434 


11 


- 


174 


18.348 


Groton . 




566 


966 


1 


34 


2 


— 


22 


1,591 


Holliston 




992 


1,657 





50 


1 


— 


16 


2,716 


Hopkinton 




919 


1,095 





30 





- 


16 


2.060 


Hudson . 




2,596 


1,539 


1 


60 





- 


49 


4.245 


Lexington 




3,331 


7,053 


46 


714 


13 


- 


536 


11.693 


Lincoln . 




342 


1,342 


62 


140 


1 


— 


15 


1,902 


Littleton 




680 


1,112 





69 


1 


— 


10 


1,872 


Lowell . 




28,591 


11,754 


45 


495 


28 


— 


494 


41.407 


Malden . 




15,200 


9,250 


17 


649 


16 


- 


346 


25,478 


Marlborough 




5,761 


3,048 


7 


100 


1 


- 


96 


9,013 


Maynard 




1,998 


1,218 


5 


72 


2 


— 


42 


3,337 


Medford 




18,421 


10,217 


38 


518 


13 


— 


359 


29.566 


Melrose 




4,914 


9,182 


23 


248 


24 


— 


151 


14.542 


Natick . 




5,451 


5,875 


3 


352 


3 


- 


109 


11.793 


Newton 




16,039 


23,134 


99 


2,635 


35 


3 


513 


42,458 


North Reading 




1,434 


1,938 


4 


65 


3 




25 


3.469 


Pepperell 




656 


896 


4 


25 


1 


- 


31 


1.613 


Reading . 




2.852 


6,022 


12 


129 


6 


- 


69 


9,090 


Sherborn 




187 


717 


1 


43 


3 




9 


960 


Shirley . 




597 


44C 





19 





- 


11 


1.073 


Somerville 




27,195 


9,704 


33 


668 


22 


- 


406 


38,028 


Stoneham 




3,790 


3,83f 


7 


17C 


6 




58 


7,867 


Stow 




351 


73' 


C 


41 


1 


- 


10 


1,140 


Sudbury . 




869 


2,45C 


> 5 


149 


4 




24 


3,510 


Tewksbury 




3,017 


2,06: 


A 


89 


C 




38 


5.211 


Townsend 




551 


86f 


2 


24 


1 


' 


14 


1.457 



Vote for Senator in Congress in 1962. 



265 



COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX — CoMc/Mdgd. 





Ml 


, 


U-, „_> 


^>h 


, 




























<y 




XITS 


S 












m 


fn 


M C 












oc 


i& 


= „■ 


°§ 










s 
















Cities axd Towns. 


11 


5| 








o 




"25 


Ufi^ 


U Ui t, 

C 4^ O 


00 c3^ 


Pi^ 


HI 










o 


I-! 


.ol 


^1 


O 

< 


c 

s 


3 
o 


Tyngsborough . 


727 


613 


4 


11 







13 


1,368 


Wakefield 






5,099 


5,732 


10 


208 


9 


- 


88 


11.146 


Waltham 






11,104 


7,600 


199 


430 


18 


— 


1.126 


20,477 


Watertown 






9,858 


6,593 


27 


584 


8 




289 


17,359 


Wayland 






1,296 


3.009 


6 


265 


1 


- 


34 


4,611 


Westford 






1,415 


1.275 


6 


59 


1 


1 


25 


2,782 


Weston . 






698 


3,108 


14 


209 


4 




32 


4,065 


Wilmington 






2,359 


2,205 


4 


84 


1 


3 


26 


4,682 


Winchester 






3,393 


5,866 


9 


226 


6 


- 


90 


9,590 


WOBURX 






8,844 


4,415 


2 


159 


3 


- 


105 


13,528 


Totals 






276,073 


228.199 


1,099 


15,785 


347 


8 


8,225 


529,736 



COUNTY OF NANTUCKET. 



Nantucket 



584 



1,010 



2 


35 


1 


- 


52 



COUNTY OF NORFOLK. 



Avon 

Bellinghara 

Braintree 

Brookline 

Canton . 

Cohasset 

Dedham . 

Dover 

Foxborough 

Franklin . 

Holbrook 

Medfield 

Med way . 

Millis 

Milton 

Needham 

Norfolk . 

Norwood 



971 
1.846 
7,020 
9,448 
3,137 

914 
5,916 

309 
1,457 
2,673 
1,956 

835 
1.269 

775 
6.989 
3.433 

452 
6,687 



837 


1 


31 


2 




20 


921 


3 


25 


2 


- 


33 


,982 


13 


229 


11 


- 


96 


,721 


136 


1,936 


17 


- 


1,172 


.541 


8 


125 




— 


50 


,788 





74 


4 


- 


25 


,003 


13 


172 


5 


- 


103 


,259 


6 


38 





_ 


9 


,221 


3 


61 


2 


- 


19 


,544 


3 


65 


2 


1 


55 


,958 


3 


58 


3 




39 


,476 


3 


55 


3 


- 


16 


,136 





49 





_ 


23 


,016 


5 


32 


1 


- 


27 


,772 


3 


369 


6 


— 


116 


,049 


10 


384 


6 


_ 


124 


600 


2 


35 


1 


- 


12 


.071 


6 


184 




- 


120 



266 Vote for Senator in Congress in 1962. 



COUNTY OF NORFOLK — Conc/wdeJ. 









<-^ i-> 


CO 1 












o 


I 




^.^ 












>>.y 


CQ 


rt 


M C 










T3 ^ 






3^^ 












c2 


a3 


0) 












Cities and Towns. 




M 


5| 


§1- 






1 




^1 


6^ 
8'S 




3531 

n 
. o a 


c3 £ 


<u 
O 


1 

1 


o 




w 


o 


J 


X 


S 


% 


m 


H 


=*la!nville 


592 


906 


3 


.8 







,8 


1,537 


3UINCY . 






22.141 


15.859 


61 


727 


23 


- 


412 


39,223 


Randolph 






4,900 


3,147 


4 


225 


2 


- 


62 


8,340 


Sharon . 






1.735 


2,336 


2 


283 


6 


- 


36 


4,398 


stoughton 






3,646 


2,940 


3 


159 





- 


63 


6,811 


.Valpole . 






2,843 


2,995 


' 2 


124 


5 


— 


48 


6,017 


A^ellesley 






2,714 


8,733 


22 


428 


6 


1 


121 


12,025 


A'estwood 






1,581 


3,383 


5 


121 


3 


- 


54 


5,147 


►Veymouth 






10,065 


9,292 


21 


356 


7 


- 


117 


19,858 


Vrentham 






653 


1,180 


4 


34 


2 


- 


14 


1,887 


Totals 






106,957 


113,666 


345 


6,397 


126 


2 


3,004 


230,497 





COUNTY OF 


PLYMOUTH 


. 








A.bington 


1.716 


2,354 


3 


77 


3 


_ 


36 


4,189 


Bridgewater 


1,540 


1,502 


3 


80 





- 


44 


3,169 


Brockton 


18,033 


12.354 


32 


541 


13 


— 


335 


31,308 


Carver . 


250 


317 





17 


1 


- 


9 


594 


Duxbury 


464 


2,015 





63 





- 


34 


2.576 


East Bridgewater 


884 


1,481 





42 





- 


18 


2,425 


Halifax . 


339 


447 


3 


12 


1 


- 


5 


807 


Hanover . 


882 


1,650 


2 


36 





- 


20 


2,590 


Flanson . 


628 


1.012 


1 


30 





- 


17 


1.688 


Hingham 


2,258 


4.191 


12 


248 


3 


- 


46 


6,758 


Hull 


1,849 


1,026 


24 


95 


7 


- 


31 


3.032 


Kingston 


865 


962 


1 


52 





1 


27 


1,908 


Lakeville 


498 


785 


1 


17 





- 


14 


1.315 


Marion . 


335 


885 


1 


21 





- 


23 


1.265 


Marshfield 


1,294 


2,050 


1 


80 


1 


- 


20 


3,446 


Mattapoisett . 


537 


907 


3 


27 


1 


- 


10 


1,485 


Middleborough 


1,826 


2,387 


6 


67 


2 


- 


53 


4.341 


Norwell . 


708 


1,554 


5 


43 





1 


17 


2.328 


Pembroke 


772 


1,273 


3 


41 





- 


11 


2,100 


Plymouth 


3,225 


3063 


2 


93 


3 


- 


96 


6.482 


Plympton 


103 


226 





4 





- 


5 


338 


Rochester 


182 


384 





8 





— 


3 


577 


Rockland 


2.747 


2,164 


2 


84 


2 


- 


49 


5.048 


Scituate . 


1,886 


2,932 


8 


164 


6 


' 


26 


5.022 



Vote for Senator m Congress in 1962. 

COUNTY OF PLYMOUTH — Conc/wdcd. 



267 



Cities and Towns. 



•^ a; 






Upi 



0) cj 



0| 






Si 



^•2 

3 6-^ 



Wareham 

West Bridgewater 

Whitman 

Totals 



1,404 

717 

1,908 



1,578 
1,395 
2.405 



47,8501 53,299 



128 



2,064 



48 



1,047 



COUNTY OF SUFFOLK. 



Boston . 
Chelsea 
Revere . 
Winthrop 

Totals 



160,985 

9,995! 

12,689; 

4,638 



61,149 
2,860 
4,866 
3,373 



188,307 72,248 1.797 



1.715 
14 
35 
3Z 



5,684 
352 
404 
292 



6.732 



237 

9 

10 



16,316 
295 
292 
364 



17,267 









COUNTY OF 


W^ORCESTER. 








Ashburnham . 


627 


613 





41 


1 




10 


1,292 


Athol 






2.444 


2,472 


3 


68 


1 


1 


72 


5.061 


Auburn . 






2,843 


3.039 


5 


101 


1 


_ 


47 


6,036 


Barre 






865 


668 


1 


26 





- 


33 


1,593 


Berlin 






211 


500 





11 





_ 


5 


727 


Blackstone 






1.656 


434 





20 


1 


_ 


21 


2,132 


Bolton . 






130 


423 


1 


26 





_ 


6 


586 


Boylston 






372 


689 





25 





_ 


8 


1.094 


Brookfield 






266 


439 


2 


11 


2 


_ 


10 


730 


Charlton 






595 


640 


2 


17 


1 


— 


11 


1,266 


Clinton . 






3,749 


1,859 


6 


70 


4 




90 


5,778 


Douglas . 






709 


553 


1 


16 





— 


22 


1,301 


Dudley . 






1,950 


747 


5 


28 





_ 


32 


2,762 


East Brookfiek 






351 


292 





8 


2 




6 


659 


FiTCHBURG 






1 1 ,980 


5,731 


13 


241 


14 


_ 


234 


18.213 


Gardner 






5,207 


2,570 


6 


106 


2 


1 


100 


7.992 


Grafton . 






2,144 


1,579 


2 


66 


3 


_ 


35 


3.829 


Hard wick 






600 


312 





7 





_ 


14 


933 


Harvard . 






174 


665 


1 


53 


1 


_ 


12 


906 


Holden . 






1.219 


3,606 


1 


130 


1 


_ 


29 


4,986 


Hopedale 






946 


1,044 


2 


21 





- 


16 


2.029 



268 



Vote for Senator in Congress in 1962. 



COUNTY OF WORCESTER — Conc/urferf. 



Cities and Towns. 









(L) - 



a; u 

T3 O 



O C 






CO — 

3 S- 



rt!3 
cd ° 



Hubbardston 

Lancaster 

Leicester 

Leominster 

Lunenburg 

Mendon . 

Milford . 

Millbury 

Millville . 

New Braintree 

North Brookfield 

Northborough 

Northbridge 

Oakham . 

Oxford . 

Paxton . 

Petersham 

Phillipston 

Princeton 

Royalston 

Rutland . 

Shrewsbury 

Southborough 

Southbridge 

Spencer . 

SterHng . 

Sturbridge 

Sutton 

Templeton 

Upton 

Uxbridge 

Warren . 

Webster . 

West Boylston 

West Brookfield 

Westborough . 

Westminster 

Winchendon 

Worcester 

Totals 



170 
502 

1,965 

7,505 

1,140 
370 

5,220 

2,484 

555 

62 

882 

995 

2,907 
85 

1,984 
392 
110 
106 
123 
126 
394 

3,372 
663 

5,548 

2,076 
415 
897 
638 

1,013 
499 

2,226 
917 

4,755 
912 
338 

1,190 
710 

1,507 
47,794 



142,585 



306 

1,032 

1,314 

4,113 

1,546 

551 

1,984 

1,429 

156 

117 

642 

1,679 

1.928 

160 

1,364 

718 

260 

164 

448 

161 

577 

3,762 

1,091 

1,828 

1,327 

930 

643 

743 

894 

772 

1,052 

552 

1,639 

1,470 

553 

2,073 

925 

922 

28.155 



98,855 



2 


17 








16 


6 





53 





8 


166 


4 





47 


1 


1 


9 


5 


4 


78 


1 


1 


58 








5 








6 





1 


15 


2 


1 


35 


1 


4 


30 


2 





7 





2 


3,i 





9 


20 


1 


1 


19 





1 


6 








40 


1 





9 





3 


19 





3 


134 


3 


3 


29 


2 


8 


68 


2 


1 


35 


1 





31 


3 


2 


27 


2 





14 


3 


2 


33 





1 


28 


1 


4 


29 


1 





11 


3 


5 


62 


4 


1 


62 


1 


1 


13 


1 


1 


60 


2 


1 


29 





1 


20 


3 


107 


1,794 


26 


229 


4,259 


116 



6 

21 

29 

160 

20 

13 

103 

25 

11 

1 

18 

20 

54 

1 

32 

10 

5 



6 

4 

9 

49 

23 

95 

36 

7 

12 

17 

18 

11 

44 

17 

61 

13 

7 

22 

15 

22 

1.099 



2.929 



Vote for Senator in Congress in 1962. 



269 



AGGREGATE OF VOTES FOR SENATOR. 





^ 








, 










o 


I 


O.co 


^^ 


"3 










>>.y 


ra 


'a 


M n 


S 










-c -> 






3'—' 
















P 


^- 










Counties. 




21 


5| 


si 






1 




^ - 


• <u 


. o 


3 S *j 




to 








ll 




1^^ 






O 


0) 

_5 






W 


o 


J 


ffi 


^ 


< 


s 


H 


Barnstable 


9,443 


18,519 


35 


747 


21 




347 


29,112 


Berkshire . 


29,396 


25,590 


187 


1,803 


50 


- 


2.139 


59.165 


Bristol 


107,743 


56,425 


158 


2,062 


128 


2 


2.071 


168,589 


Dukes County . 


1,094 


1,668 


3 


55 


6 


- 


59 


2.885 


Essex . 


137,895 


114,809 


268 


4.988 


151 


1 


3,171 


261,283 


Franklin . 


9,211 


13,039 


19 


491 


21 


- 


335 


23,116 


Hampden 


86.099 


63.319 


996 


3,220 


119 


2 


5,759 


159.514 


Hampshire . 


19,374 


17,023 


64 


1.375 


41 


- 


561 


38,438 


Middlesex . 


276.073 


228.199 


1,099 


15,785 


347 


8 


8,225 


529,736 


Nantucket . 


584 


1.010 


2 


35 


1 


- 


52 


1,684 


Norfolk 


106,957 


113,666 


345 


6.397 


126 


2 


3.004 


230.497 


Ply-mouth . 


47,850 


53,299 


128 


2.064 


48 


2 


1.047 


104,438 


Suffolk 


188.307 


72,248 


1,797 


6.732 


264 


3 


17,267 


286,618 


Worcester . 


142,585 


98,855 


229 


4,259 


116 


3 


2.929 


248,976 


Totals . 


1,162.611 


877,669 


5,330 


50,013 


1,439 


23 


46,966 


2.144,051 



270 Representatives, Eighty-eighth Congress. 



REPRESENTATIVES — EIGHTY-EIGHTH 
CONGRESS. 



Election, November 6, 1962. 
District 

No. 1. Silvio O. Conte {R) of Pittsfield. 

No. 2. Edward P. Boland {D) of Springfield. 

No. 3. Philip J. Philbin (D) of Clinton. 

No. 4. Harold D. Donohue {D) of Worcester. 

No. 5. F. Bradford Morse {R) of Lowell. 

No. 6. William H. Bates {R) of Salem. 

No. 7. Torbert H. Macdonald {D) of Maiden. 

No. 8. Thomas P. O'Neill, Jr. (JD) of Cambridge. 

No. 9. John W. McCormack {D) of Boston. 

No. 10. Joseph William Martin, Jr. {R) of North 

Attleborough. 

No. 11. James A. Burke {D) of Milton. 

No. 12. Hastings Keith {R) of West Bridgewater. 



Representatives, Eighty-eighth Congress. 271 



VOTE FOR REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS 
IN 1962 

(BY DISTRICTS.) 



Election, November 6, 1962. 



CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT NO. 1. 



Cities and Tovv-ns. 



^ 


U^ 1 


o^ 


O O 


3 


fcS 


<U 9! 


I« 


^Q 


u . 


^cJ 




^1. 


'in 


^ 



Adams . 

Alford . 

Amherst 

Ashfield . 

Athol . 

Becket . 

Bernardston 

Blandford 

Buckland 

Charlemont 

Cheshire 

Chester . 

Chesterfield 

Clarksburg 

Colrain . 

Conway . 

Cummington 

Dalton . 

Deerfield 

Easthampton 

Egremont 

Erving . 

Florida , 

Gill 

Goshen . 

Granville 

Great Barrington 

Greenfield 

Hadley . 



4,206 
96 

2,702 
405 

3,734 
259 
422 
307 
586 
332 
757 
307 
214 
584 
401 
275 
276 

2.355 
966 

3,319 
359 
379 
194 
362 
171 
329 

2.14S 

5,698 
720 



1,234 
7 

909 
57 
1,186 
45 
62 
44 

103 
36 

187 
98 
17 

113 

116 
69 
15 

400 

362 

1.899 

40 

145 
47 
83 
18 
41 

616 
1.931 

502 



127 


5,567 


1 


104 


104 


3,715 


11 


473 


141 


5,061 


6 


310 


9 


493 


2 


353 


22 


711 


8 


376 


8 


952 


6 


411 


15 


246 


14 


711 


7 


524 


6 


350 


3 


294 


35 


2,790 


33 


1.361 


186 


5.404 


10 


409 


17 


541 


15 


256 





445 


1 


190 


5 


375 


81 


2,845 


164 


7.793 


70 


1,292 



272 Representatives, Eighty-eighth Congress. 

CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT No. 1 — Continued. 







^ 










oi; 


o o 










3 


<y 3 










Z, o 


|Q 










C V 












o 






-2 


Cities and Towns. 


-a 


\4 £ 


to 




o 




6'i 

05 ^ 


^io 


53 


CO 


1 




•En-S 


ilt 


o 




15 








< 


03 
S 


^ 


Hancock 


160 


24 


_ 


5 


189 


Hatfield . 




518 


383 


— 


54 


955 


Hawley . 




68 


14 


— 





82 


Heath . 




102 


13 


- 


6 


121 


Hinsdale 




423 


120 


— 


12 


555 


HOLYOKE 




11,017 


6,667 


- 


3.672 


21,356 


Huntington 




375 


168 


— 


16 


559 


Lanesborough . 




914 


190 


- 


20 


1,124 


Lee 




1,707 


364 


— 


39 


2,110 


Lenox 




1,490 


286 


— 


33 


1,809 


Leverett 




234 


51 


— 


289 


574 


Leyden . 




99 


29 


- 





128 


Middlefield . 




95 


12 


- 


2 


109 


Monroe . 




53 


17 


- 


2 


72 


Montague 




2,499 


1,053 


— 


83 


3,635 


Montgomery . 




136 


18 


- 


2 


156 


Monterey 




182 


52 


— 


8 


242 


Mount W ashington 




29 


5 


- 





34 


New Ashford . 




58 


12 


— 





70 


New Marlborough 




284 


33 


— 


15 


332 


New Salem 




162 


23 


- 


2 


187 


North Adams 




6,200 


1,749 


2 


174 


8,125 


Northampton 




6,969 


3,312 


— 


401 


10,682 


Northfield 




796 


125 


— 


5 


926 


Orange . 






1,879 


399 


- 


41 


2.319 


Otis 






136 


29 


— 


18 


183 


Pelham . 






253 


57 


— 


13 


323 


Peru 






63 


9 


- 


3 


75 


Petersham 






289 


86 


- 


20 


395 


Phillipston 






213 


63 


- 


1 


277 


Pittsfield 






17,645 


4,401 


1 


2.118 


24,165 


Plainfield 






95 


16 


— 


3 


114 


Richmond 






381 


49 


- 


3 


433 


Rowe 






113 


23 


— 


5 


141 


Royalston 






189 


96 




15 


300 


Russell . 






345 


118 


— 


18 


481 


Sandisfield 






109 


76 


- 


3 


188 


Savoy 






104 


33 


- 


6 


143 


Sheffield 






661 


126 


_ 


11 


798 


Shelburne 






681 


118 


- 


14 


813 


Shutesbury 






76 


36 




7 


119 



Represe7itatives, Eighty-eighth Congress. 273 

CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT No. 1 — Concluded. 



Cities and Towns. 



U . 

o t; 



o c 
X - 



Southampton . 

Southwick 

Stockbridge 

Sunderland 

Templeton 

Tolland . 

Tyringham 

Warwick 

Washington 

Wendell . 

West Stockbridge 

Westfield 

Westhampton . 

Whately 

Williamsburg . 

Williamstown . 

Windsor 

Worthington . 

Totals 



624 

1.300 
817 
362 

1,157 

46 

100 

162 

77 

75 

422 

6.905 
192 
266 
684 

2,295 
124 
225 



250 

539 

168 

12 

746 

14 

10 

25 

18 

30 

101 

2,994 

40 

134 

221 

416 

19 

22 



17 

23 

20 

14 

57 

5 

2 

5 

2 

1 

20 

337 

3 

18 

19 

33 

1 

5 



891 

1,862 

1,005 

503 

1,960 

65 

112 

192 

97 

106 

543 

10,236 

235 

418 

924 

2,745 

144 

252 



106,498 



36,711 



8.828 



152.041 



274 Representatives, Eighty-eighth Congress, 



CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT No. 2. 







<*- 












°A 


c i 










¥ 


1=: 










-Sq 


T3 >> 










o'-' 


O^ 










»-a- 


^^ 






CO 


Cities and Towns. 




'^61 


2 










1°1 

i-^^ 
^ 


6 


c 

s 




Agawam 


4,643 


1,948 


_ 


94 


6,685 


Belchertown . 






706 


696 


1 


21 


1,424 


Bi-imfield 






274 


276 


— 


23 


573 


Brookfield 






292 


405 


- 


33 


730 


Chicopee 






17,156 


3,575 


- 


581 


21,312 


East Brookfield 






3^3 


273 


— 


33 


659 


East Longmeadow 






1,891 


2,259 


— 


199 


4,349 


Granby . 






678 


740 


- 


12 


1,430 


Hampden 






482 


508 


- 


6 


996 


Holland . 






154 


104 


— 


6 


274 


Longmeadow . 






2,105 


3,203 


- 


35 


5,343 


Ludlow . 






4,646 


1,128 


— 


165 


5,939 


Monson . 






1,161 


853 


- 


52 


2,066 


North Brookfield 






911 


582 


- 


67 


1,560 


Palmer . 






3,236 


1,313 


- 


187 


4,736 


South Hadley . 






3,244 


2,296 


- 


83 


5,623 


Springfield . 






36,963 


15,904 


- 


5,148 


58,015 


Sturbridge 






931 


589 


- 


63 


1,583 


Wales . 






166 


96 


- 


3 


265 


Ware . 






2,758 


882 


— 


136 


3,776 


Warren . 






951 


478 


- 


71 


1,500 


West Brookfield 






365 


518 


- 


30 


913 


West Springfield 






6,666 


3,458 


- 


119 


10,243 


Wilbraham 






1,598 


1,789 


- 


36 


3,423 


Totals 






92,340 


43,873 


1 


7,203 


143,417 



I 



Representatives, Eighty-eighth Congress. 

CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT No. 3. 



275 

















^o 6 

.si 












£Q 


CX5 










O 3 










'£. 


Si a 






-2 


Cities and Towns. 


c 


> 


£ 

% 




o 

1 




B-^'^ 


•^1 


s 


M 


"rt 




|=o& 


rtCO 




c5 


o 




Cu, 


fc 


< 


5 


H 


Acton .... 


1,389 


1,765 




92 


3,246 


Ashburnham . 






823 


430 


— 


39 


1,292 


Ashby . 






357 


367 


- 


11 


735 


Ayer 






985 


426 


- 


41 


1,452 


Barre 






1,136 


405 


— 


52 


1,593 


Bellingham 






1.997 


763 


— 


70 


2,830 


Berlin . 






456 


257 


_ 


14 


727 


Blackstone 






1,828 


276 


- 


28 


2,132 


Bolton . 






464 


114 


_ 


8 


586 


Boxborough 






126 


220 




6 


352 


Charlton 






749 


486 




31 


1,266 


Clinton . 






5,143 


540 


- 


95 


5,778 


Douglas . 






849 


413 


— 


39 


1,301 


Dudley . 






2,212 


452 


- 


98 


2,762 


Dunstable 






122 


198 


— 


14 


334 


Fitch BURG 






13.828 


3,859 


_ 


526 


18,213 


Franklin 






2,902 


1,256 


- 


185 


4,343 


Gardner 






6,259 


1,472 


_ 


261 


7,992 


Groton . 






752 


791 


- 


48 


1,591 


Hardwick 






736 


170 


— 


27 


933 


Harvard 






445 


442 


_ 


19 


906 


Holliston 






1,193 


1,451 


- 


72 


2,716 


Hopedale 






1,190 


805 


- 


34 


2.029 


Hubbardston 






313 


178 


_ 


10 


501 


Hudson . 






3,403 


770 


1 


71 


4,245 


Lancaster 






1,086 


448 


_ 


43 


1,577 


Leicester 






2,439 


818 




104 


3,361 


Leominster 






9,396 


2,260 


_ 


300 


11,956 


Littleton 






939 


883 


_ 


50 


1,872 


Lunenburg 






1,648 


1,069 




37 


2,754 


Marlborough 






7,020 


1,793 


_ 


200 


9,013 


Maynard 






2,416 


838 




83 


3.337 


Medway 






1,436 


964 


- 


77 


2,477 


Mendon . 






477 


451 




21 


949 


Milford . 






5,936 


1,154 




300 


7,390 


MiUbury 






2,874 


1.012 


- 


111 


3,997 


Millis . 






950 


1 829 


- 


77 


1.856 


Millville 






612 


103 




12 


727 


Natick . 






6,667 


4,575 


- 


551 


11,793 


New Braintree 




114 


67 




5 


186 



276 Representatives, Eighty-eighth Congress. 

CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT No. 3 — Concluded. 





><-H 1 


«*-■ c 










o o 


° rt 










a% 


s 

>,:=. 










ac^ 


C£i 










2g 
•^2 






w. 


Cities and Towns. 




1 

6 


s, 


"3 




rtCA) 




i2 


o 




^ 


fc 


< 


« 


H 


Northbridge . 


3,658 


1,177 


90 


4,925 


Oakham 








133 


114! 


6 


253 


Oxford . 








2,453 


8791 


83 


3,415 


Paxton . 








577 


556! - 


17 


1,150 


Pepperell 








786 


752 


- 


75 


1,613 


Princeton 








276 


330 


— 


12 


618 


Rutland . 








629 


357 


— 


16 


1,002 


Sherborn 








274 


648 


- 


38 


960 


Shirley . 








764 


284 


- 


25 


1.073 


Southbridge 








6,176 


1,105 




267 


7,549 


Spencer . 








2,622 


742 


_ 


111 


3,475 


Sterling . 








857 


511 


- 


18 


1,386 


Stow 








672 


438 


— 


30 


1,140 


Sutton . 








899 


481 


- 


36 


1,416 


Townsend 








773 


654 


— 


30 


1.457 


Tyngsborough 








811 


495 


- 


62 


1.368 


Upton . 








749 


527 


- 


36 


1,312 


Uxbridge 








2,598 


658 


- 


100 


3.356 


Webster . 








5,281 


1,0581 


187 


6.526 


Westford 








1,693 


995 3 


91 


2,782 


Westminster 








1,077 


5661 


37 


1.680 


Winchendon 








1,901 


520| - 


54 


2.475 


Totals 








129,326 


49,418 


4 


5.283 


184.031 



Representatives, Eighty-eighth Congress. 277 



CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT No. 4. 



. 




^1 










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53 w 






CO 


Cities and Towns. 






2 

a; 

o 


1 


15 




rt o o 


rt o^ 


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i 


o 




^ 


m 


< 


M 


H 


Ashland .... 


2,404 


227 




ihS 


2,986 


Auburn . 






4,872 


693 


- 


471 


6,036 


Boylston 






873 


129 


— 


92 


1,094 


Framingham . 






14,885 


1,351 


- 


2,112 


18,348 


Grafton . 






3,175 


285 


- 


369 


3,829 


Holden . 






3,735 


717 


1 


533 


4,986 


Hopkinton 






1,642 


200 




218 


2,060 


Northborough 






2,185 


236 


- 


310 


2.731 


Shrewsbury 






6,115 


606 


- 


602 


7,323 


Southborough . 






1,407 


178 


— 


lib 


1.811 


Sudbury 






2,382 


433 


15 


680 


3,510 


Waltham 






11,678 


184 


— 


8,615 


20,477 


Watertown 






13,422 


1,506 


2 


2,429 


17,359 


Wayland 






3,066 


525 


5 


1,015 


4,611 


Westborough . 






2,560 


344 


1 


443 


3,348 


West Boylston 






1,952 


272 


- 


235 


2,459 


Weston . 






2.345 


536 


6 


1.178 


4,065 


Worcester . 






66,468 


6,888 


2 


5,617 


78,975 


Totals . 






145,166 


15,310 


32 


25.500 


186.008 



278 Representatives, Eighty-eighth Congress. 



CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT No. 5. 





"oi 


^J: 


















m 


Cities and Towns. 


^o 


1=s 






^ 






11c 


1 

6 








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Andover 


2,941 


5,495 




91 


8,527 


Bedford . 








833 


2,448 


- 


68 


3,349 


Billerica . 








2,718 


3.828 


— 


64 


6,610 


Burlington 








2,312 


2,981 


- 


121 


5.414 


Carlisle . 








86 


600 


- 


5 


691 


Chelmsford 








1,834 


5,842 


- 


53 


7,729 


Concord 








1,133 


4,494 


- 


121 


5,748 


Dracut . 








2,089 


4,059 


— 


76 


6,224 


Lawrence 








25,620 


6,834 


- 


739 


33,193 


Lexington 








2,395 


8,269 


- 


1,029 


11,693 


Lincoln . 








298 


1,554 


— 


50 


1,902 


Lowell . 








15,838 


24,913 


- 


656 


41,407 


Melrose 








4,415 


9,733 


— 


394 


14,542 


North Reading 








1.388 


2,022 


- 


59 


3,469 


Reading . 








2,519 


6,386 


— 


185 


9,090 


Stoneham 








3,359 


4,294 


— 


214 


7,867 


Tewksbury 








2,091 


3,080 


- 


40 


5,211 


Wilmington 








1,876 


2,745 


- 


61 


4,682 


Winchester 








2,674 


6,675 


1 


240 


9,590 


WOBURN 








7,085 
83,504 


6,203 




240 


13,528 


Totals 








112,455 


1 


4,506 


200,466 



Representatives, Eighty-eighth Congress. 279 



CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT No. 6. 

















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Cities and Towns. 


ffi^ 


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Amesbury 


2.554 


2.020 


. 


118 


4,692 


Beverly 








10,816 


4,756 


— 


282 


15,854 


Boxford . 








990 


115 


- 


12 


1,117 


Danvers 








6,049 


2.874 


- 


87 


9,010 


Essex 








790 


200 


— 


14 


1,004 


Georgetown 








1,235 


394 


- 


29 


1,658 


Gloucester 








6.595 


3,911 


- 


319 


10,825 


Groveland 








1,055 


443 


- 


19 


1,517 


Hamilton 








2,032 


414 


- 


35 


2.481 


Haverhill 








10.375 


8,836 


- 


504 


19.715 


Ipswich . 








2.697 


1,104 


— 


111 


3,912 


Lynn 








14,036 


26,204 


— 


878 


41,118 


Manchester 








1,582 


407 


- 


37 


2,026 


Marblehead 








7.551 


1.801 


— 


164 


9,516 


Merrimac 








1,013 


431 


- 


27 


1.471 


Methuen 








5,824 


7,404 


- 


453 


13,681 


Middleton 








832 


404 


— 


16 


1,252 


Nahant . 








926 


774 


- 


32 


1.732 


Newbury 








1.127 


296 


- 


30 


1.453 


Newburyport 






3,680 


2.709 


— 


281 


6,670 


North Andover 






2,927 


2,448 


— 


151 


5,526 


Pea BODY 






7,036 


8,322 


- 


420 


15.778 


Rockport 








1,957 


606 


- 


60 


2,623 


Rowley . 








841 


232 


- 


27 


1,100 


Salem . 








10.353 


8,048 


- 


371 


18,772 


Salisbury 








1.021 


482 


— 


64 


1,567 


Swampscott 








3.955 


2,076 


- 


475 


6,506 


Topsfield 








1,415 


174 


- 


20 


1.609 


Wenham 








1,159 


148 


— 


14 


1,321 


West Newbury 






681 


154 


- 


18 


853 


Totals 








113.104 


88,187 


- 


5,068 


206.359 



280 Represe?itatives, Eighty-eighth Congress. 



CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT No. 7. 

















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^^ 










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Cities and Towns. 


S-oi 


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O 


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H 


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Arlington 


14,900 


9,213 


_ 


980 


25,093 


Belmont 








7,421 


6,894 


— 


587 


14,902 


Chelsea 








10,360 


1,647 


- 


1,518 


13.525 


Everett 








12,211 


3,444 


- 


3,476 


19,131 


Lynnfield 








1,835 


2,276 


- 


93 


4,204 


Malden 








19,723 


5,056 


- 


699 


25,478 


Medford 








21,760 


6,532 


- 


1,274 


29,566 


Revere . 








13,717 


2,815 


- 


1,764 


18,296 


Saugus . 








5,443 


3,298 


— 


259 


9,000 


Wakefield 








6,954 


3,961 


— 


231 


11,146 


Winthrop 








4,793 


2.153 


- 


1,762 


8,708 


Totals 








119,117 


47,289 


- 


12,643 


179,049 



CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT No. 





^-oJ 


"o i 










Pr 












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c. 














Cities and Towns. 


PhU 5 


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5 


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. 


H 


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m 


H 


Boston, Wards 1. 2, 3, 21, 












22 ... . 


33,193 


8,684 


- 


15,161 


57,038 


Brookline 


9,729 


11,351 


- 


5,350 


26.430 


Cambridge 


28,424 


10.437 


- 


1.832 


40.693 


Somerville . 


29.468 


6,902 




1,658 


38,028 


Totals 


100,814 


37.374 


- 


24,001 


162,189 



Representatives, Eighty-eighth Congress. 281 



CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT No. 9. 





•^2 










rt S 










Si' 










sQ 










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03 


Cities and Towns. 


c^2 


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< 


« 


H 


Boston, Wards 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. 9, 10, 11. 










12. 13, 14, 15, 16, 17. 19, 20 


105,565 


2 


60,987 


166,554 



282 Representatives, Eighty-eighth Congress. 



CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT No. 10. 





^^3 


"06 










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a^-. 


oQ 


















Cities and Towns. 


I^§ 


, • > 






1 




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tin, Jr. 
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Ill 


1 

6 


1 


pa 




1— > 


W 


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5 


H 


Attleboro 


6,965 


3,009 




193 


10,167 


Berkley . 






405 


193 


- 


17 


615 


Dighton . 






1.027 


391 


— 


35 


1,453 


Dover 






1.385 


173 


_ 


63 


1,621 


Easton . 






2,866 


908 


- 


81 


3,855 


Fall River . 






20.688 


21,367 


- 


1,470 


43,525 


Foxborough 






2,813 


886 


- 


64 


3,763 


Freetown 






815 


348 


— 


33 


1,196 


Mansfield 






2,179 


1,035 


- 


88 


3,302 


Medfield 






1.812 


517 


— 


59 


2,388 


Need ham 






10.226 


2,356 


— 


424 


13,006 


Newton 






25,908 


13,732 


- 


2,818 


42,458 


Norfolk . 






762 


314 


— 


26 


1,102 


North Attleborough 






4,096 


1,592 


- 


129 


5,817 


Norton . 






1,503 


608 


_ 


55 


2,166 


Plainville 






1,143 


373 


_ 


21 


1,537 


Ray n ham 






1,416 


529 


- 


72 


2,017 


Rehoboth 






1,375 


508 


— 


50 


1,933 


Seekonk . 






2,275 


1.170 


— 


57 


3,502 


Somerset 






3.650 


2,069 


_ 


108 


5,827 


Swansea 






2,903 


1,587 


- 


68 


4.558 


Taunton 






8,629 


6,622 


2 


716 


15,969 


Walpole . 






3.937 


1,915 


- 


165 


6,017 


Wellesley 






9,942 


1,748 


— 


335 


12,025 


\^■estwood 






3,917 


1,083 


- 


147 


5,147 


Wrentham 






1,454 


410 


- 


23 


1.887 


Totals 






124,091 


65,443 


2 


7,317 


196,853 



Representatives, Eighty-eighth Congress. 

CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT No. 11. 



283 





'06 


o3 










^^ 


1^ 










t^ 


Is 






(» 


Cities and Towns. 


K 


^|c 






J 




ill 









1 






rt 
^ 




< 


5 


H 


Avon .... 


1.154 


677 


_ 


31 


1.862 


Boston, Ward 18 






15,282 


3,832 


1 


3.382 


22,497 


Braintree 






8,091 


6,029 


— 


231 


14,351 


Brockton 








19,720 


10,790 


- 


798 


31,308 


Canton . 








3,736 


2,025 


— 


100 


5,861 


Dedham 








5,792 


5.220 


- 


200 


11,212 


Holbrook 








2,420 


1,538 


— 


59 


4,017 


Milton . 








8,646 


5,424 


- 


185 


14,255 


Norwood 








7,267 


3,557 




251 


11,075 


QUINCY . 








24,680 


13,687 


- 


856 


39,223 


Randolph 








5,968 


2,190 




182 


8,340 


Sharon . 








2,309 


1,972 




117 


4,398 


Stoughton 








4,061 


2,569 


- 


181 


6,811 


Weymouth 








11,904 


7,628 


- 


326 


19,858 


Totals 








121,030 


67,138 


1 


6,899 


195.068 



284 



Representatives, Eighty-eighth Congress. 



CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT No. 12. 





■— 


^ , 










'-' o 


c o 










r- ^ 


§" 










tj ^ 


£Q 










M-^rt 


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m 


Cities and Towns. 




E 

c3 ^ 


2 




O 








6 


c3 


1 














^ 


< 


< 


s 


H 


Abington 


2.713 


1.369 


_ 


107 


4,189 


Acushnet 




i 1,375 


1.096 


— 


49 


2.520 


Barnstable 




1 4.835 


1,530 


- 


156 


6,521 


Bourne . 




1,533 


638 


— 


51 


2.222 


Brewster 




' 594 


101 


— 


19 


714 


Bridgewater . 




1 2,051 


1,032 


- 


86 


3.169 


Carver . 




394 


184 


- 


16 


594 


Chatham 




1,469 


231 


- 


29 


1,729 


Chilmark 




119 


13 


— 


2 


134 


Cohasset 




1,985 


743 


- 


77 


2.805 


Dartmouth 




3,935 


2,663 


- 


209 


6,807 


Dennis . 




1,781 


399 


— 


43 


2,223 


Duxbury 




1 2,186 


319 


- 


71 


2,576 


East Bridgewater 




1.843 


528 


— 


54 


2,425 


East ham 




585 


100 


- 


23 


708 


Edgartown 




547 


117 


- 


45 


709 


Pairhaven 




3,632 


2,505 


— 


125 


6.262 


Falmouth 




3,139 


1,570 


— 


130 


4,839 


Gay Head 




24 


14 


- 


10 


48 


Gosnold . 




38 


5 


- 





43 


Halifax . 




544 


246 


- 


17 


807 


Hanover 




1,873 


662 


_ 


55 


2.590 


Hanson . 




1,206 


438 


- 


44 


1.688 


Harwich 




1,753 


371 


— 


50 


2.174 


Hingham 




4.755 


1,819 


- 


184 


6.758 


Hull 




1,341 


1,506 


- 


185 


3.032 


Kingston 




1,215 


602 


- 


91 


1,908 


Lakeville 




988 


309 


— 


18 


1,315 


Marion . 




1,000 


242 


- 


23 


1.265 


Marshfield 




2,320 


1,052 


1 


73 


3.446 


Mattapoisett . 




1.082 


376 


- 


27 


1.485 


Mashpee 




121 


95 


- 


14 


230 


Middleborough 




3,054 


1,184 


- 


103 


4.341 


Nantucket 




1,225 


298 


- 


161 


1,684 


New Bedford 




20,507 


21,691 


- 


1,796 


43.994 


Norwell . 




1,757 


523 


- 


48 


2,328 


Oak Bluffs 




460 


171 


— 


51 


682 


Orleans . 




1.168 


139 


- 


35 


1.342 


Pembroke 




1,486 


569 


- 


45 


2,100 


Plymouth 




3,722 


2.401 


" 


359 


6,482 



Representatives, Eighty-eighth Congress. 285 



CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT No. \2 — Concluded. 







*oA 










°S 


g 










- '^ 


c § 










■z ^ 


SQ 










'S M„ 


>^ 








Cities and Towns. 






u 




CO 

% 








Si 

o 


1 

5 


1 
















s 


< 


< 


s 


H 


Plympton 


255 


71 


_ 


12 


338 


Provincetown . 






685 


582 


- 


67 


1,334 


Rochester 






446 


128 


- 


3 


577 


Rockland 






2.839 


2,043 


— 


166 


5,048 


Sandwich 






689 


219 


_ 


30 


938 


Scitiiate . 






3,177 


1,709 


- 


136 


5,022 


Tisbury . 






745 


274 


- 


55 


1,074 


Truro 






276 


107 


— 


10 


393 


Wareham 






1,941 


1,042 


— 


91 


3,074 


WelMeet 






485 


151 


_ 


26 


662 


V\'est Bridgewater 






1,810 


315 


- 


31 


2,156 


West Tisbury . 






158 


24 


— 


13 


195 


Westport 






1,840 


1,174 


- 


90 


3,104 


Whitman 






2,906 


1,362 


_ 


150 


4,417 


Yarmouth 






2,393 


629 


- 


61 


3,083 


Totals . 






107,000 


59,681 


- 


5,622 


172.303 



286 



Vote for Governor. 



VOTE FOR GOVERNOR. 

(BY COUNTIES.) 

Election November 6, 1962. 



COUNTY OF BARNSTABLE. 





^^& 

s 


3dy of 
Dem- 


lomen 
e. So- 


03 










Ow- 


x> . 


"Sfe 


.5&J 








Cities and Towns. 


>5 


CUTS 




^ r-- 


to 









.is 

1 




SOU 





M 


< 


1 




Barnstable 


4,642 


1,819 


5 7 


_ 


48 


6,521 


Bourne 


1,432 


771 


1 


— 


18 


2,222 


Brewster . 


556 


148 








- 


10 


714 


Chatham . 


1,369 


349 








— 


11 


1,729 


Dennis 


1,661 


543 


1 


2 


- 


16 


2.223 


Eastham . 


556 


147 








- 


5 


708 


Falmouth . 


2,970 


1,801 


3 




1 


60 


4.839 


Harwich . 


1,648 


506 


3 




- 


13 


2.174 


Mashpee . 


118 


105 







— 


7 


230 


Orleans 


1,056 


278 







- 


7 


1,342 


Provincetown . 


561 


739 


5 




- 


26 


1.334 


Sandwich . 


632 


299 







— 


6 


938 


Truro 


230 


160 







- 


2 


393 


Wellfleet . 


429 


227 







— 


5 


662 


Yarmouth 


2,215 


848 


3 




- 


16 


3,083 


Totals 


20,075 


8,740 


20 


26 


1 


250 


29,112 



COUNTY OF BERKSHIRE. 



Adams 


2.383 


3,052 


19 


4 


_ 


109 


5,567 


Alford 


79 


25 








- 





104 


Becket 


192 


111 










7 


310 


Cheshire . 


460 


479 


1 





- 


12 


952 


Clarksburg 


418 


280 


2 





~ 


11 


711 



Vote for Governor. 



287 



COUNTY OF BERKSUIRE — Concluded. 









7X "^ 










Cities and Towns. 


Is 

1 


03 <V 




;2i 
in 




CO 

6 
< 


5 


a 


Dalton 


1,502 


1,262 


2 


7 




17 


2,790 


Egremont 


320 


81 





1 


- 


7 


409 


Florida 


148 


101 





1 


— 


6 


256 


Great Barrington 


1.491 


1,305 


1 


5 


— 


43 


2,845 


Hancock . 


139 


45 








- 


5 


189 


Hinsdale . 


249 


298 





1 


_ 


7 


555 


Lanesborough . 


580 


531 





2 


- 


11 


1,124 


Lee . 


1,139 


939 





5 


- 


27 


2,110 


Lenox 


965 


814 


2 


1 


_ 


27 


1,809 


Monterey . 


150 


88 








- 


4 


242 


Mount Washington . 


28 


6 








— 





34 


New Ashford . 


46 


24 








_ 





70 


New Marlborough 


244 


80 


2 





_ 


6 


332 


North Adams . 


3,958 


4,026 


8 


8 


- 


125 


8,125 


Otis .... 


124 


46 


1 





— 


12 


183 


Peru 


48 


25 








_ 


2 


75 


PiTTSFIELD 


10,426 


12,202 


• 143 


64 


_ 


1,330 


24,165 


Richmond 


279 


152 








_ 


2 


433 


Sandisfield 


106 


76 


1 


2 


- 


3 


188 


Savoy 


86 


52 








_ 


5 


143 


Sheffield . 


578 


207 


1 


1 


_ 


11 


798 


Stockbridge 


590 


402 


2 


1 


_ 


10 


1,005 


Tyringham 


80 


32 








- 





112 


Washington 


53 


41 


1 





— 


2 


97 


West Stockbridge 


309 


227 





1 


_ 


6 


543 


William stown . 


1,790 


922 


1 


3 


- 


29 


2,745 


Windsor . 


88 


53 








- 


3 


144 


Totals 


29,048 


27,984 


187 


107 


- 


1,839 


59,165 



COUNTY OF BRISTOL. 



Acushnet . 


758 


1.725 


5 


2 




30 


2,520 


Attleboro 


6,013 


4,023 


19 


7 


1 


104 


10.167 


Berkley . 


328 


273 


1 


1 




12 


615 


Dartmouth 


3,267 


3,427 


21 


8 


- 


84 


6,807 



288 



Vote for Governor. 



COUNTY OF BRISTOL — Concluded. 





-., 


ti 


1.^ 


°3 










K 


t3Q 


^oJ 


S'S 












•O . 


==3S 


.Gd: 








Cities and Towns. 




Endicott Pea 
Cambridge 
ocratic 


•Pi 




1 

o 

< 


S 


1 


Dighton . 


750 


690 


2 







11 


1.453 


Easton 


2,521 


1,312 


2 


3 


- 


17 


3.855 


Fairhaven 


2,831 


3,358* 5 


8 


- 


60 


6,262 


Fall River 


11,785 


30,493 


113 


69 


- 


1,065 


43,525 


Freetown . 


655 


523 


2 


2 




14 


1.196 


Mansfield . 


1,883 


1,362 


5 


1 


- 


51 


3,302 


New Bedfobid . 


14,262 


28,627 


140 


86 


— 


879 


43,994 


North Attleborough . 


3,403 


2,311 


10 


6 


- 


87 


5.817 


Norton 


1,298 


841 


1 


5 


- 


21 


2,166 


Raynham 




1,205 


786 4 


1 


- 


21 


2,017 


Rehoboth 




1,216 


678 


4 


6 


_ 


29 


1,933 


Seekonk 




2,025 


1,434 


4 


2 


- 


37 


3,502 


Somerset 




2,415 


3,356 


6 


3 


- 


47 


5.827 


Swansea 




2,066 


2,425 


6 


7 


- 


54 


4,558 


Taunton 




5,948 


9,608 


23 


15 


- 


375 


15.969 


Westport 




1,559 


1,485 


7 


4 


- 


49 


3.104 


Totals 


66,188 


98,737 


380 


236 


1 


3,047 


168,589 



COUNTY OF DUKES COUNTY. 



Chilmark . 


106 


27 








1 


134 


Edgartown 






476 


209 


1 


4 


— 


19 


709 


Gay Head 






21 


23 




- 


- 


4 


48 


Gosnold . 






29 


13 


- 


— 


- 


1 


43 


Oak Bluffs 






393 


262 


1 


3 


— 


23 


682 


Tisbury . 






633 


415 


2 


1 


- 


23 


1,074 


West Tisbury 






140 


52 


- 


- 


- 


3 


195 


Totals 






1.798 


1,001 


4 


8 


- 


74 


2.885 



Vote for Governor. 



289 



COUNTY OF ESSEX. 









<4-> 1 


.*- 


i^ 












°^ 














K 


o 


S" 


S2 








Cities and Towns. 


41 


1^ 


"11 

Eh 

OJ o '^ 


1^ 
^ - 


o 


a 


3 
o 




o 

1—1 


w 


:i: 


O 


< 


s 


H 


Amesbury 


2,191 


2,457 


6 


1 


_ 


37 


4,692 


Andover . 






5,807 


2,662 


4 


8 


_ 


46 


8,527 


Beverly . 






9.070 


6,586 


16 


15 


— 


167 


15,854 


Boxford . 






943 


168 





1 


_ 


5 


1,117 


Danvers . 






5,100 


3,843 


6 


7 


_ 


54 


9,010 


Essex 






689 


307 


2 


2 


- 


4 


1,004 


Georgetown 






1,182 


456 


1 


6 


- 


13 


1,658 


Gloucester 






6,011 


4,702 


9 


12 


_ 


91 


10,825 


Groveland 






966 


541 





1 


- 


9 


1.517 


Hamilton . 






1,759 


687 


3 


6 


- 


26 


2,481 


Haverhill 






9,039 


10,330 


34 


28 


— 


284 


19,715 


Ipswich 






2,254 


1,611 


7 


2 


- 


38 


3,912 


Lawrence 






10,820 


21,644 


83 


45 


— 


601 


33,193 


Lynn 






17,281 


23,269 


94 


54 


_ 


420 


41,118 


Lynnfield . 






3,190 


998 


1 


2 


- 


13 


4,204 


Manchester 






1,467 


545 


2 





— 


12 


2,026 


Marblehead 






6,957 


2,497 


9 


6 


- 


47 


9,516 


Merrimac . 






924 


535 


1 


1 


— 


10 


1,471 


Methuen . 






6,624 


6,903 


23 


17 


_ 


114 


13,681 


Middleton 






707 


531 


1 


1 


- 


12 


1,252 


Nahant 






1,030 


684 


4 


2 


_ 


12 


1,732 


Newbury . 






1,066 


377 


1 





- 


9 


1,453 


Newburyport 






3,240 


3,307 


5 


3 


— 


115 


6,670 


North Andover 






3.077 


2,395 


2 


6 


- 


46 


5,526 


Pea BODY . 






6,329 


9,210 


32 


16 


— 


191 


15,778 


Rockport . 






1,857 


727 


6 


4 


— 


29 


2.623 


Rowley 






753 


337 








- 


10 


1,100 


Salem 






6,370 


12.086 


15 


20 


— 


281 


18,772 


Salisbury . 






868 


669 


2 


4 


- 


24 


1,567 


Saugus 






5,141 


3,783 


23 


6 


- 


47 


9.000 


Swampscott 






4.198 


2,167 


12 


7 


_ 


122 


6,506 


Topsfield . 






1,306 


296 


1 


2 


- 


4 


1,609 


Wenham . 






1.076 


237 


1 


2 


_ 


5 


1,321 


West Newbury 






604 


220 





2 


- 


27 


853 


Totals 


129.896 


127,767 


406 


289 


- 


2,925 


261,283 



290 



Vote for Governor. 



COUNTY OF FRANKLIN. 





a 




-Si, 


cole 

;5CL, 








Cities and Towns. 




la 

:j'5.y 
SSrt 


m 




2 

6 


3 






o 
>—> 


w 


ffi 


O *" 


^ 


5 


H 


Ashfield . 


393 


74 








_ 


6 


473 


Bernardston 






379 


111 


1 


1 


— 


1 


493 


Buckland . 






526 


178 


1 





- 


6 


711 


Cheirlemont 






310 


60 


1 





- 


5 


376 


Colrain 






354 


168 








— 


2 


524 


Conway . 






257 


90 





1 


- 


2 


350 


Deerfield . 






702 


643 


5 





- 


11 


1,361 


Erving 






301 


229 


1 





— 


10 


541 


Gill . 






295 


145 


1 





— 


4 


445 


Greenfield 






4.420 


3.268 


12 


16 


- 


77 


7,793 


Hawley 






67 


15 








— 





82 


Heath 






96 


23 


1 





— 


1 


121 


Leverett . 






218 


65 





1 


- 


3 


287 


Leyden 






95 


33 








- 





128 


Monroe 






30 


39 








— 


3 


72 


Montague 






1,565 


2.006 


4 


4 


- 


56 


3.635 


New Salem 






151 


34 








- 


2 


187 


Northfield 






717 


201 





3 


- 


5 


926 


Orange 






1,583 


701 


1 


3 


— 


31 


2,319 


Rowe 






107 


32 





1 


— 


1 


141 


Shelburne 






645 


159 





1 


- 


8 


813 


Shutesbury 






64 


53 








- 


2 


119 


Sunderland 






287 


211 


1 





— 


4 


503 


Warwick . 






152 


39 








— 


1 


192 


Wendell . 






66 


39 








— 


1 


106 


Whately . 






222 


184 


2 





- 


10 


418 


Totals 






14.002 


8,800 


31 


31 


- 


252 


23,116 



COUNTY OF HAMPDEN. 



Agawam . 


3,540 


3,074 


.3 


5 


_ 


53 


6.68J 


Blandford 


282 


66 


1 





— 


4 


353 


Brimfield . 


368 


199 





1 


- 


5 


573 


Chester . 


252 


155 


2 


1 


— 


1 


411 


Chicopee 


6,525 


14.343 


62 


37 


- 


345 


21.312 


East Longmeadow 


2,932 


1.317 


12 


5 




83 


4.349 



Vote for Governor. 



291 



COUNTY OF HAMPDEN — Conceded. 



Cities and Towns. 


s 

41 

.S3 


OS 

^^■^ 

8 S rt 

158 


Sis 

.5 m ■£ 

o o u 




£2 

6 


CO 

C 


o 

1 

1 
o 




>— » 


W 


S 


O 


< 


n 


^ 


Granville . 


304 


69 










2 


375 


Hampden . 






640 


348 


3 





- 


5 


996 


Holland . 






156 


118 








- 





274 


HOLYOKE . 






7,831 


12,117 


306 


60 


- 


1,042 


21.356 


Longmeadow 






4,284 


1,017 


6 


2 


— 


34 


5,343 


Ludlow 






2,397 


3.389 


13 


5 


- 


135 


5.939 


Monson . 






1,227 


808 


4 


3 


- 


24 


2.066 


Montgomery 






121 


34 








- 


1 


156 


Palmer 






2.028 


2,596 


6 


8 


- 


98 


4,736 


Russell 






274 


195 


3 


1 


— 


8 


481 


Southwick 






1.103 


739 


2 


3 


- 


15 


1,862 


Springfield 






27.534 


27.732 


426 


109 


— 


2.214 


58,015 


Tolland . 






40 


23 








_ 


2 


65 


Wales 






141 


123 


1 





_ 





265 


West Springfield 






5.760 


4.363 


16 


13 


_ 


91 


10,243 


Westfield 






4.892 


5,177 


25 


11 


1 


130 


10.236 


Wilbraham 






2,410 


988 


3 


3 


- 


19 


3.423 


Totals 






75,041 


78.990 


904 


267 


1 


4.311 


159,514 



COUNTY OF HAMPSHIRE. 



Amherst . 


2,346 


1,313 


5 


4 




47 


3,715 


Belchertown 


794 


617 


1 


1 


_ 


11 


1,424 


Chesterfield 


205 


31 


1 


1 


- 


8 


246 


Cummington 


246 


43 


1 


1 


— 


3 


294 


Easthampton 


2,260 


3.035 


29 


4 


- 


76 


5.404 


Goshen 


160 


28 








— 


2 


190 


Granby . 


751 


668 


2 


2 


- 


7 


1.430 


Hadley . 


580 


677 


3 


1 


- 


31 


1.292 


Hatfield . 


392 


548 





2 




13 


955 


Huntington 


297 


257 








- 


5 


559 


Middlefield 


85 


23 








— 


1 


109 


Northampton . 


5,110 


5.405 


25 


4 


_ 


138 


10,682 


Pelham . 


221 


98 





1 


~ 


3 


323 



292 



Vote for Governor. 



COUNTY OF UAMFSHIRE — Concluded. 



Cities and Towns. 






C I 


U-< 1 






c^^ 


c:s 






.2 aJ 


12 






^=S 






<s^ 


^c 


to 








o 


C3 


ffi 


o 


< 


CQ 



Plainfield . 

South Hadley 

Southampton 

Ware 

Westhampton 

Williamsburg 

Worthington 

Totals 



2,884 
512 

1,388 
178 
565 
211 



19,2691 



28 





2,677 


15 


372 





2,302 


7 


56 


1 


345 


1 


40 





18,563 


91 



37 



COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX. 



Acton 

ArUngton 

Ashby 

Ashland 

Ayer 

Bedford 

Belmont 

Billerica 

Boxborough 

Burlington 

Cambridge 

Carlisle . 

Chelmsford 

Concord . 

Dracut 

Dunstable 

Everett . 

Framingham 

Groton 

Hollislon . 

Hopkinton 

Hudson 

Lexington 

Lincoln 



2,444 
13.856 

468 
1,733 

714 
2,330 
9.437 
3,190 

272 
3,048 
15,349 

558 
4,618 
3,841 
2,441 

226 

8,962 

10,329 

987 
1,828 
1,180 
1,965 
7,793 
1,400 



775 


7 


J 


_ 


19 


11,036 


25 


13 


- 


163 


260 


3 




— 


3 


1,240 


2 


2 


- 


10 


725 


1 




— 


11 


982 


6 


3 


— 


28 


5,329 


14 


7 


- 


115 


3,361 


8 


5 


— 


46 


73 





2 


_ 


5 


2,334 


6 


3 


- 


23 


24,739 


93 


26 


— 


486 


132 








_ 


1 


3,058 


10 


8 


- 


35' 


1,862 


2 


4 


— 


39, 


3,695 


13 


4 


_ 


71 


103 


1 


1 


- 


3 


9,341 


163 


21 


- 


644 


7,891 


9 


7 


- 


112 


588 


3 


2 


_ 


11 


879 


3 





~ 


6| 


864 


1 


3 




12] 


2.236 


3 


1 


- 


40! 


3,558 


40 


20 


- 


2821 


480 


4 


3 


_ 


15 



Vote for Governor. 



293 



COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX — CoMcZwded. 



Cities and Towns. 



o .- 



o 






log 



gi-i 
Sou 



7)^ 



Littleton . 
Lowell . 
MaldeM . 
Marlborough 
Maynard . 
Medford . 
Melrose . 
Natick 
Newton . 
North Reading 
Pepperell . 
Reading , 
Sherborn . 
Shirley 
Somerville 
Stoneham 
Stow 

Sudbury . 
Tewksbury 
Townsend 
Tyngsboroagh 
Wakefield 
Waltha-M 
Watertown 
Wayland . 
Westford . 
Weston 
Wilmington 
Winchester 

WOBURN . 

Totals 



1,207 

14,248 

12.116 

3,898 

1,437 

15,358 

10,057 

6,675 

25,159 

2,096 

926 

6,529 

755 

498 

15,298 

4,650 

799 

2,500 

2,497 

920 

684 

6,973 

10,039 

8,669 

3,264 

1.3781 

3,292 

2,530! 

7,166 

6,246 



276,833 



649 

26,430 

13.010 

5,011 

1.834 

13,867 

4,354 

4,999 

16,879 

1,351 

668 

2,504 

199 

553 

22,155 

3,140 

328 

989 i 

2,683 

526 

669 

4,088 

9.753 

8,507 

1.311 

1,377 

749 

2,118 

2,364 

7,163 



245,779 1,025 



36 
3 
2 

40 
8 

14 

66 
1 
2 
4 



80 
7 

4 
3 
1 
1 

12 
169 

29 
8 
3 
7 
6 
5 

14 



11 

61 

286 
92 
60 

281 

109 
95 

318 
20 
14 
48 
2 
10 

477 
61 
12 
14 
21 
9 
12 
66 

490 

146 
22 
22 
14 
23 
51 
99 



423 



5,676 



COUNTY OF NANTUCKET. 



Nantucket 



1,210 



409 



62 



1,684 



294 



Vote for Governor. 



COUNTY OF NORFOLK. 







o 




el 








Cities and Towns. 


^1= 

il 

>—> 






o 


2 

M 
6 

< 


s 


1 


Avon 


955 


890 


1 


3 




13 


1.862 


Belli ngham 






1,134 


1,658 


5 


2 


- 


31 


2.830 


Braintree . 






7,534 


6.671 


14 


17 


— 


115 


14.351 


Brookline . 






14,477 


11.189 


177 


25 


- 


562 


26,430 


Canton 






3,126 


2,685 


7 


4 


— 


39 


5,861 


Cohasset . 






1,832 


946 


1 


2 


_ 


24 


2,805 


Dedham . 






6,063 


5.047 


5 


7 


- 


90 


11.212 


Dover 






1,328 


285 


3 





_ 


5 


1,621 


Foxborough 






2,358 


1.380 


4 


3 


- 


18 


3,763 


Franklin . 






1,995 


2,287 


6 


2 


— 


53 


4,343 


Holbrook . 






2,190 


1,793 


5 


7 


_ 


22 


4,017 


Medfield . 






1.561 


809 


1 


1 


- 


16 


2,388 


Med way , 






1,280 


1,173 


2 


5 


_ 


17 


2,477 


Millis 






1.094 


745 


3 


1 


— 


13 


1,856 


Milton 






7,839 


6,312 


10 


5 


_ 


89 


14,255 


Needham . 






9.761 


3,145 


9 


6 


1 


84 


13,006 


Norfolk . 






655 


432 


1 


4 




10 


1,102 


Norwood . 






5,517 


5.445 


9 


4 


— 


100 


11,075 


Plainville . 






973 


553 


3 







8 


1,537 


QUINCY . 






18,635 


20,066 


59 


41 




422 


39.223 


Randolph . 






3,695 


4,571 


11 


8 


- 


55 


8.340 


Sharon 






2,404 


1,960 


6 


4 




24 


4,398 


Stoughton 






3,473 


3,260 


15 


7 


— 


56 


6,811 


Walpole . 






3,591 


2,380 





3 


- 


43 


6,017 


Wellesley . 






9,250 


2,685 


5 


6 


— 


79 


12.025 


VVestwood 






3,784 


1,330 


5 


5 


_ 


23 


5,147 


Weymouth 






9,963 


9,710 


24 


27 


- 


134 


19,858 


Wrentham 






1,207 


666 


4 





- 


10 


1.887 


Totals 






127,674 


100,073 


395 


199 


1 


2,155 


230.497 



COUNTY OF PLYMOUTH. 



Abington . 


2,459 


1,693 


5 


4 




28 


4,189 


Bridgewater 


1,698 


1,433 


2 





- 


36 


3.169 


Brockton 


15.240 


15,625 


58 


37 


- 


348 


31,308 


Carver 


336 


251 








"" 


7 


594 



Vote for Governor, 



295 



COUNTY OF PLYMOUTH — Concluded. 









"II 
lis 


^ 








Cities and Towns. 




ndicott Peabody o 
Cambridge, Dem 
ocratic 


OS 

if 
1°" 


6 










U 


'" 


o 


< 


5 


H 


Duxbury . 


2.075 


474 





3 


_ 


24 


2.576 


East Bridgewater 


1,571 


835 


4 


3 




12 


2,425 


Halifax . 


477 


324 








1 


5 


807 


Hanover 




1.669 


896 


2 


2 




21 


2,590 


Hanson 




1.077 


594 


1 


1 


— 


IS 


1,688 


Hingham 




4,450 


2.254 


7 


6 


- 


41 


6,758 


Hull 




1,164 


1.830 


3 


2 


— 


33 


3,032 


Kingston 




1.090 


796 


2 





- 


20 


1,908 


Lakeville 




774 


523 1 


1 


— 


16 


1,315 


Marion 




902 


349 





2 


_ 


12 


1,265 


Marshfield 


2.134 


1.288 


1 


2 


_ 


21 


3.446 


Mattapoisett 


970 


497 


2 


1 


- 


15 


1.485 


Middleborough . 


2.569 


1,708 5 


6 


— 


53 


4.341 


Nor^vell . 


1.602 


712 


3 


1 


— 


10 


2.328 


Pembroke 


1,318 


761 


6 





- 


15 


2.100 


Plymouth 


3,439 


2.968 


2 


5 


- 


68 


6,482 


Plympton 


235 


100 


1 





— 


2 


338 


Rochester 


400 


174 








— 


3 


577 


Rockland . 


2,370 


2,628 





3 


_ 


47 


5,048 


Scituate . 


3.131 


1.854 


9 


3 


- 


32 


5,022 


Wareham . 


1,859 


1.163 


6 


3 


_ 


49 


3,074 


West Bridgewater 


1,498 


646 


2 


3 


- 


7 


2.156 


Whitman . 


2,600 


1,772 


4 


3 


- 


38 


4.417 


Totals 


• • 


59.107 


44.148 


113 


91 


1 


978 


104.438 



COUNTY OF SUFFOLK. 



Boston 
Chelsea . 
Revere . 
Winthrop . 


91.319 
4,010 
7.741 
4.158 


143,608 

9,139 

10,190 

4,316 


1.519 
26 
25 
41 


323 
24 
18 
14 


- 


9.320 
326 
322 
179 


246.089 

13.525 

18.296 

8.708 


Totals 


107,228 


167,253 


1.611 


37, 


- 


10.147 


286,618 



296 



Vote for Governor. 



COUNTY OF WORCESTER. 





u- 


i^ 














o. 


'o g 


05 ~ 












S 


o 


s*; 


§2 










Cities and Towns. 


1^' 

41 


<D tx 

111 






c 


Si 


^ 


CO 

CQ 




o 
t— 1 


16 § 


1^1 




.o 


O 








W 


K 


o 




< 


n 


^ 


Ashburnham 


670 


610 












12 


1.292 


Athol 


2,974 


2.032 


4 




1 


- 


50 


5,061 


Auburn 






3,407 


2,553 


6 




27 


— 


43 


6,036 


Barre 






815 


751 


2 




1 


_ 


24 


1,593 


Berlin 






544 


178 


1 




2 


- 


2 


727 


Blackstone 






589 


1,513 


5 




1 


— 


24 


2,132 


Bolton 






439 


140 


2 







- 


5 


586 


Boylston . 






732 


356 


I 




1 


— 


4 


1,094 


Brookfield 






486 


232 


2 




1 


_ 


9 


730 


Charlton . 






712 


538 


1 




6 


- 


9 


1,266 


Clinton . 






2.570 


3,095 


15 




5 


— 


93 


5,778 


Douglas . 






618 


658 


3 




4 


- 


18 


1.301 


Dudley 






1,104 


1,609 


6 




4 


— 


39 


2,762 


East Brookfield 






351 


298 


1 




2 


_ 


7 


659 


FiTCHBURG 






7.584 


10,313 


32 




22 


- 


262 


18.213 


Gardner . 






3,133 


4,721 


14 




6 


— 


118 


7.992 


Grafton . 






1,911 


1.875 


7 




5 


- 


31 


3,829 


Hardwick . 






391 


522 


4 







— 


16 


933 


Harvard . 






680 


223 


1 







— 


2 


906 


Hoiden . 






3,819 


1.136 


2 




3 


- 


26 


4,986 


Hopedale . 






1.211 


805 










- 


13 


2,029 


Hubbardston 






302 


193 


2 




1 


— 


3 


501 


Lancaster . 






1,096 


449 


3 




5 


- 


24 


1,577 


Leicester . 






1,553 


1,767 







7 


- 


34 


3.361 


Leominster 






5.408 


6,397 


7 




10 


- 


134 


11.956 


Lunenburg 






1,637 


1,095 


3 




5 


- 


14 


2.754 


Mendon . 






624 


315 


1 




1 


_ 


8 


949 


Milford . 






3,310 


3,973 


5 




3 


- 


99 


7,390 


Millbury . 






1.707 


2.261 


5 




3 


- 


21 


3,997 


Millville . 






192 


518 


1 




3 


— 


13 


727 


New Braintree 






121 


63 










- 


2 


186 


North Brookfielc 






791 


759 










— 


10 


1,560 


Northborough 






1.858 


863 


1 




4 


- 


5 


2,731 


Northbridge 






2,241 


2,638 


2 




2 


— 


42 


4,925 


Oakham . 






169 


82 


2 







— 





253 


Oxford 






1.654 


1,736 


2 




7 


_ 


16 


3,415 


Paxton . 






817 


325 


1 







- 


7 


1,150 


Petersham 






279 


109 







1 


— 


6 


395 


Phillipston 






155 


121 










- 


^ 


277 



Vote for Governor. 



297 



COUNTY OF WORCESTER — Concluded. 



1 ^ , 


U-. 1 


c . 


Vm I 












o g 
>>^ 
o 


11 


°3 

il 










o^- 


^ . 




;2a; 








Cities and Towns. 


.S3 


II 
15 g 









c 


W3 

C 




>—> 


w :::: 





< 


S 


^ 


Princeton . 


482 


132| 







4 


618 


Royalston 






170 


1241 





- 


6 


300 


Rutland . 






601 


3961 


1 


- 


4 


1.002 


Shrewsbury* 






4,540 


2.728' 7 


5 


- 


43 


7.323 


Southborough 






1,174 


620i Oi 1 


- 


16 


1.811 


Southbridge 






2,868 


4,545i 111 8 


- 


117 


7.549 


Spencer 






1,600 


1.832 2| 4 


— 


37 


3,475 


Sterling . 






1,002 


377! o: 1 


— 


6 


1 ,386 


Sturbridge 






801 


760| 5! 2 


- 


15 


1,583 


Sutton 






809 


59ll 1| 3\ 


12 


1,416 


Templeton 






994 


952 2 OJ 


12 


1,960 


Upton 






820 


480' 1 1 




10 


1,312 


Uxbridge . 






1.347 


1,962 3! 5 


- 


39 


3,356 


Warren 






678 


795' 3 2 


— 


22 


1,500 


Webster . 






2,487 


3,941; 4 10 


— 


84 


6,526 


West Boylston 






1,683 


760; 41 4 


- 


8 


2,459 


West Brookfield 






600 


301 1 4 1 


— 


7 


913 


W'estborough 






2,191 


^,136: 3 


- 


18 


3,348 


Westminster 






985 


676! 2' 4i 


13 


1,680 


Winciiendon 






1,027 


l,415j 6: 2j -1 25 


2.475 


Worcester 






35,009 


42,733 106 103| 


1,024 


78,975 


Totals 






120,522 


125,078! 308 300 


2.768 


248,976 



298 



Vote for Governor. 



AGGREGATE OF VOTES FOR GOVERNOR. 





-'& 




1^ 


°a 








Counties. 


Is 

.53 


r. 

^^ 
111 

lug 


CCS t- 

-IS 

soy 


if 
> - 


1 

o 




1 
"(5 

o 




>—i 


W 


X 


O 


< 


S 


H 


Barnstable 


20,075 


8,740 


20 


26 


1 


250 


29,112 


Berkshire . 


29,048 


27,984 


187 


107 


- 


1.839 


59,165 


Bristol 


66.188 


98,737 


380 


236 


1 


3.047 


168.589 


Dukes County . 


1.798 


1,001 


4 


8 




74 


2.885 


Essex . 


129,896 


127,767 


406 


289 




2,925 


261.283 


Franklin 


14,002 


8,800 


31 


31 


- 


252 


23.116 


Hampden 


75,041 


78,990 


904 


267 


1 


4,311 


159,514 


Hampshire . 


19.269 


18,563 


91 


37 


- 


478 


38.438 


Middlesex . 


276.833 


245.779 


1,025 


423 


- 


5,676 


529.736 


Nantucket . 


1,210 


409 


2 


1 


- 


62 


1.684 


Norfolk 


127,674 


100,073 


395 


199 


1 


2,155 


230.497 


Plymouth . 


59,107 


44,148 


113 


91 


1 


978 


104.438 


Suffolk 


107.228 


167.253 


1,611 


379 


- 


10.147 


286.618 


Worcester . 


120.522 


125,078 


308 


300 


- 


2.768 


248.976 


Totals . 


1,047,891 


1.053.322 


5,477 


2,394 


5 


34.962 


2.144.051 



Vote for State Officers. 



299 



VOTE FOR STATE OFFICERS. 

Election November 6, 1962. 



For Lieutenant-Governor. 
Francis X. Bellotti of Quincy (Democratic) 
Francis \V. Perry of Duxbury (Republican) 
Thomas Maratea of Greenfield (Prohibition) 
Francis A. Votano of Lynn (Socialist Labor) 
All others . ..... 

Blanks 



1,037,704 votes 


970,157 




6,508 




8,666 




7 




121,009 


' 



For Attorney-General 

Edward W. Brooke of Boston (Republican) 
Francis E. Kelly of Boston (Democratic) 
Edgar E. Gaudet of Lynn (Socialist Labor) 
Howard B. Rand of Haverhill (Prohibition) 
All others . . 
Blanks 



1,143,065 votes 

883.710 

9,591 

5,610 

25 

102,050 



For Secretary. 

Kevin H. White of Boston (Democratic) 
Harris A. Reynolds of Wellesley (Republican) 
John Erlandson of Boston (Socialist Labor) . 
Julia B. Kohler of Boston (Prohibition) 
All others ....... 

Blanks 



1.250,467 votes 

713,708 

9,433 

7,201 

2 

163,240 



For Treasurer and Receiver-General. 

John Thomas DriscoU of Boston (Democratic) . 1,225,754 votes 

Joseph B. Grossman of Quincy (Republican) . 744,115 

Isaac Goddard of Newton (Prohibition) . . . 7,074 

Arne A. Sortell of Randolph (Socialist Labor) . 9,039 

All others ........ 6 

Blanks 158.063 



300 



Vote for State Officers. 



For Auditor. 
Thomas J. Buckley of Boston (Democratic*) . 
Philip M. Walsh of Springfield (Republican) . 
Louise T. Metays of Boston (Prohibition) 
Ethelbert L. Nevens of Lynn (Socialist Labor) 
All others ....... 

Blanks 



,343,625 


fotes 


627,701 




' 


5,973 




* 


8.874 




' 


9 






157,869 




' 



For Executive Councillors. 

First District. 
Ernest C. Stasiun of Fairhaven (Democratic) 
Howard W. Young of Dartmouth (Republican) 
All others ....... 

Blanks ....... 



134,071 votes 
128,130 " 
10 " 
15.723 " 



Second District. 

Margaret M. Heckler of Wellesley (Republican) . 132,112 votes 

Alvin C. Tamkin of Boston (Democratic) . . 123,272 " 

All others 2 " 

Blanks 32,541 " 



Third District. 
Chester W. Cooper of Cambridge (Republican) 
John W. Costello of Boston (Democratic) 
All others ....... 

Blanks 



112,035 votes 
122,773 " 
3 " 
41,680 " 



Fourth District. 

Patrick J. McDonough of Boston (Democratic) . 144,937 votes 

Joseph C. Kazanowski of Braintree (Republican) . 51,945 " 

All others ........ 1 " 

Blanks 40.221 " 






Fifth District. 
John Joseph Buckley of Lawrence (Democratic) 
Samuel Adams of Manchester (Republican) 
All others ....... 

Blanks 



146,073 votes 
103,748 •• 

•' 

15,021 " 



Vote for State Officers. 



301 



Sixth District. 
Joseph Ray Crimmins of Somerville (Democratic) 
Paul S. Vaitses. Jr. of Melrose (Republican) . 
All others ....... 

Blanks 



163.297 votes 
91.919 " 



21.851 



Seventh District. 
Edmund Burke of Worcester (Republican) 
Walter F. Kelly of Worcester (Democratic) 
All others ...... 

Blanks 



111,187 votes 
136.644 " 
" 
12.151 " 



Eighth District. 

Raymond F. Sullivan of Springfield (Democratic) . 131.269 votes 

Theodore W. Bamforth of Springfield (Republican) , 102.838 " 

All others 2 " 

Blanks 28.591 « 



STATISTICS 



STATE, POST OFFICE, COUNTY 
AND JUDICIARY 



Governors and Lieut. -Governors. 



305 



GOVERNORS AND LIEUT.-GOVERNORS. 



CHOSEN ANNUALLY BY THE PEOPLE. 



1620 Nov. 11, 

1621 April. 

1633 Jan. 1, 

1634 Mar. 27. 

1635 Mar, 3, 

1636 Mar. 1. 

1637 Mar. 7, 



Governors of 
John Carver. 
William Bradford. 
Edward Winslow. 
Thomas Prence. 
William Bradford. 
Edward Winslow. 
William Bradford. 



Plymouth Colony. 

1638 June 5, Thomas Prence. 



1639 June 

1644 June 

1645 June 
1657 June 
1673 June 



3, William Bradford. 
5, Edward Winslow. 

4. William Bradford. 
3. Thomas Prence. 
3. Josiah Winslow. 



1680 Dec. 18. Thomas Hinckley." 



Deputy-Governors of Plymouth Colony. 
1680 Thomas Hinckley .t I 1682 William Bradford, 



1681 James Cudworth. 



1689 William Bradford, 



to 1686 
to 1692 



CHOSEN ANNUALLY UNDER THE FIRST CHARTER. 



Governors of Massachusetts Bay Colony. 



1629 Mar. 
1629 Apr. 
1629 Oct. 

1634 May 

1635 May 

1636 May 

1637 May 

1640 May 

1641 June 

1642 May 

1644 May 

1645 May 



4, Matthew Cradock.J 
30, John Endicott.X 
20, John Winthrop.J 
14, Thomas Dudley. 

6. John Haynes. 
25. Henry Vane. 

17, John Winthrop. 

13, Thomas Dudley. 

2, Richard Bellingham. 

18, John Winthrop. 
29, John Endicott. 

14. Thomas Dudley. 



1646 May 6. 

1649 May 2, 

1650 May 22, 

1651 May 7, 

1654 May 3, 

1655 May 23, 
1665 May 3, 

1672 Dec. 12, 

1673 May 7, 
1679 May 28, 



John Wintlirop. 
John Endicott. 
Thomas Dudley. 
John Endicott. 
Richard Bellingham. 
John Endicott. 
Richard Bellingham. 
JohnLeverett(act'g). 
John Leverett. 
Simon Bradstreet, to 
May 20, 1686. 



* Mr. Hinckley was Governor till the union of the colonies in 1692, 
except during the administration of .^.ndros. 

t Previously there was no Deputy-Governor, a Governor pro tern being 
appointed by the Governor to serve in his absence. 

J A patent of King James I, dated Nov. 3, 1620, created the Council 
for New England and granted it the territory in North America from 



306 



Governors and Lieut. -Governors. 



Deputy-Governors of Massachusetts Bay Colony. 



1629 Thomas Goffe.*to Oct. 20, 
1629 Thomas Dudley . 

1634 Roger Ludlow 

1635 Richard Bellingham 

1636 John Winthrop 

1637 Thomas Dudley 

1640 Richard Bellingham 

1641 John Endicott 
1644 John Winthrop 
1646 Thomas Dudley 



0,1629 


1650 John Endicott . to 


1651 


. 1634 


1651 Thomas Dudley . 


1653 


. 1635 


1653 Richard Bellingham 


1654 


. 1636 


1654 John Endicott 


1655 


. 1637 


1655 Richard Bellingham . 


1665 


. 1640 


1665 Francis Willoughby 


1671 


. 1641 


1671 John Leverett 


1673 


. 1644 


1673 Sam'l Symonds, to Oct. 


1678 


. 1646 


1678 Oct.. Simon Bradstreet 


1679 


1650 


1679 Thomas Danforth 


1686 



40° to 48° N. latitude and from sea to sea. to be known thereafter as New 
England in America. By instrument of March 19, 1628. the Council for 
New England granted to Sir Henry Rosewell and others the territory 
afterwards confirmed by royal Charter to the "Governor and Company 
of the Massachusetts Bay in Newe England." This Charter, which 
passed the seals March 4, 1629, designated Matthew Cradock as the 
first Governor of the Company and Thomas Goffe as the first Deputy- 
Governor. Both had held similar offices from the grantees under the 
instrument of March 19, 1628. On May 13, 1629, the same persons were 
rechosen by the Company; but they never came to New England. On 
Oct. 20, 1629, John Winthrop was chosen Governor of the Company and 
John Humfrey Deputy-Governor. Humfrey having declined the serv- 
ice, Thomas Dudley was chosen in his stead. 

John Endicott had been sent over in 1628, with a small band, as the 
agent of the grantees under the instrument of March 19, 1628. While 
Cradock was Governor of the Company, a commission, dated April 30, 
1629, was sent out to Endicott at Salem appointing hira "Governor of 
London's Plantation in the Massachusetts Bay in New England." In 
the exercise of this commission he was subordinate to the "Governor 
and Company" in London, by whom he was deputed, and who, from 
time to time, sent him elaborate instructions for his conduct. Cradock 
and Endicott were thus chief governor and local governor, respectively, 
from April 30, 1629, or, rather, from the time when Endicott's commis- 
sion reached Salem, a few weeks later, until Oct. 20, 1629; and Winthrop 
and Endicott were chief and local governors, respectively, from that 
date until the arrival of Winthrop at Salem with the Charter, June 
12, 1630, when Endicott's powers merged in the general authority of 
Winthrop. 

* Thomas Goffe, the first Deputy-Governor, never came to New 
England. John Humfrey was elected, but did not serve. 



Governors and Lieut. -Governors. 



307 



THE INTER-CHARTER PERIOD. 
On May 25, 1686, Joseph Dudley became President of New England 
under a commission of King James II, and had jurisdiction over the 
royal dominions in New England. This office he held till December 20, 
the same year, when Sir Edmund Andros became Governor of New Eng- 
land, appointed by King James II. On April 18, 1689, Governor Andros 
was deposed by a revolution of the people. 



AFTER THE DISSOLUTION OF THE FIRST CHARTER. 
Simon Bradstreet was Governor from June 7, 1689, to May 16, 1692, 
and Thomas Danforth was Deputy-Governor during the same time. 



APPOINTED BY THE KING UNDER SECOND CHARTER. 



Governor of the Province 
1692 May 16, Sir William Phips. 
1694 Dec. 4, William Stoughlon* 

1699 May 26, Richard Coote.f 

1700 July 17, William Stoughton. 

1701 July 7, The Council. 

1702 June 11. Joseph Dudley. 
1715 Feb. 4, The Council. 
1715 Mar. 21. Joseph Dudley. 

1715 Nov. 9. William Tailer.X 

1716 Oct. 5, Samuel Shute. 
1723 Jan. 1. William Dummer. 

1728 July 19. William Burnet. 

1729 Sept. 7. William Dummer. 



OF THE Massachusetts Bay. 
1730 June 11, William Tailer. 
1730 Aug. 10, Jonathan Belcher. 
1741 Aug. 14, William Shirley. 
1749 Sept. 11, Spencer Phips. 
1753 Aug. 7. William Shirley. 
1756 Sept. 25, Spencer Phips. 



1757 April 
1757 Aug. 
1 760 June 
1760 Aug. 
1769 Aug. 
1771 Mar. 14 
1774 May 17 



4, The Council. 
3, Thomas Pownal, 
3, Thomas Hutchinson. 
2, Francis Bernard. 
2, Thomas Hutchinson. 

Thomas Hutchinson. 

Thomas Gage. 



Lieutenant-Governors of the Province of the Massachusetts 



Bay. 



1692 Wm. Stoughton. to July. 1701 
1702 Thomas Povey .1706 

1706 Jan.. vacancy to Oct. . 1711 
1711 William Tailer. 
1716 William Dummer. 



1730 William Tailer. 
1732 Spencer Phips. 
1758 Thomas Hutchinson. 
1771 Andrew Oliver. 
1774 Thomas Oliver 



* Those whose names are printed in italics were Acting Governors. 

t Richard Coote, Earl of Bellomont. 

; On Nov. 9, 1715, Elizeus Burgess was proclaimed Governor, he hav- 
ing been commissioned on March 17, 1715, but he never came over to 
perform his duties, and resigned the office in April, 1716. 



308 



Governors and Lieut.-Governors. 



UNTIL THE CONSTITUTION. 
1774 Oct., a Provincial Congress. | 1775 July. The Council. 



UNDER THE CONSTITUTION. 
Governors of The Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 



1780 John Hancock . to 1785 
1785 James Bowdoin . .1787 
1787 John Hancock. Oct. 8 . 1793 
1794 Samuel Adams . .1797 
1797 Increase Sumner, June 7, 1799 
1807 
1808 
1810 
1812 
1816 
1823 
1825 
1834 
1835 
1840 
1841 
1843 
1844 
1851 
1853 
1854 
1855 
1858 
1861 
1866 
1869 
1872 
1874 
1876 
1879 
1880 



1800 Caleb Strong . 

1807 Jas. Sullivan. Dec. 10 

1809 Christopher Gore . 

1810 Elbridge Gerry 
1812 Caleb Strong . 
1816 John Brooks . 
1823 Wm. Eustis. Feb. 6 
1825 Levi Lincoln . 
1834 John Davis, March 1 
1836 Edward Everett . 

1840 Marcus Morton 

1841 John Davis . 

1843 Marcus Morton 

1844 George N. Briggs . 
1851 George S. Boutwell 

1853 John H. Clifford . 

1854 Emory Washburn . 

1855 Henry J. Gardner . 
1858 Nathaniel P. Banks 
1861 John A. Andrew 
1866 Alexander H. Bullock 
1869 William Claflin 

1872 William B. Washburn* 

1875 William Gaston 

1876 Alexander H. Rice. 
1879 Thomas Talbot 



1880 John Davis Long . to 1883 

1883 Benjamin F. Butler . 1884 

1884 George D. Robinson . 1887 
1887 Ohver Ames . . .1890 

1890 John Q. A. Brackett . 1891 

1891 William E. Russell . 1894 
1894 Frederic T. Greenhalget 1896 
1897 Roger WoIcoLt . .1900 
1900 W. Murray Crane . 1903 
1903 John L. Bates . .1905 

1905 William L. Douglas . 1906 

1906 Curtis Guild. Jr. . . 1909 
1909 Eben S. Draper . .1911 
1911 Eugene N. Foss . . 1914 
1914 David I. Walsh . . 1916 
1916 Samuel W. McCall . 1919 
1919 Calvin Coolidget . . 1921 
1921 Channing H. Cox . . 1925 
1925 Alvan T. Fuller . .1929 
1929 Frank G. Allen . .1931 
1931 Joseph B. Ely . . 1935 
1935 James M. Curley . . 1937 
1937 Charles F. Hurley . 1939 
1939 Leverett Saltonstall . 1945 
1945 Maurice J. Tobin . . 1947 
1947 Robert F. Bradford . 1949 
1949 Paul A. Dever . . 1953 
1953 Christian A. Herter . 1957 
1957 Foster Furcolo . . 1961 
1961 John A Volpe . . 1963 
1963 Endicott Peabody 



* Resigned April 29, 1874. Chosen U.S. Senator April 17. 1874. 
t Died March 5, 1896. 

tVice President of the United States, 1921-23; President. Aug. 3, 
1923, to March 4, 1929. 



Governors mid Lieiit.-Governors. 



309 



LlEUTBNANT-GOVERNORS OF ThE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 



1 780 Thus. Cushmg. to Feb. 28.* 1 788 

1788 Beujamin Lincoln . .1789 

17 S9 Samuel Adams . .1794 

1794 Moses Gtil, May 20t . 1800 

1801 Sam'l Phillips. Feb. 10 . 1802 

1802 Edward H. Robbins . 1806 
1807 Levi LincolnX . . .1809 

1809 David Cobb . . . 1810 

1810 William Gray . . 1812 
1812 William Phillips . 1823 

1823 Levi Lincoln, Feb.. . 1824 

1824 Marcus Morton, July . 1825 
1826 Thomas L. Winthrop . 1833 
1833 Samuel 3\ Armstrong . 1836 
1836 George Hull . . .1843 

1843 Henry H. Childs . .1844 

1844 John Reed . . . 1851 
1851 Henry W. Cushman . 1853 

1853 Ehsha Huntington . 1854 

1854 WilHam C. Plunkett . 1855 

1855 Simon Brown . . 1856 

1856 Henry W. Benchley . 1858 
1858 EUphalet Trask . . 1861 

1861 John2.Goodrich,Mar,29.1861 

1862 John Nesmith. Sept. . 1862 

1863 Joel Hayden . . . 1866 
1866 William Claflin . .1869 
1869 Joseph Tucker . . 1873 
1873 Thomas Talboi^ . . 1875 
1875 Horatio G. Knight . 1879 
1879 John Davis Long . . 1880 



1880 Byron Weston . . 1883 
1883 Oliver Ames . . . 1887 
1887 John Q. A. Brackett . 1890 
1890 William H. Haile . .1893 
1893 Roger WolcottW . . 1897 
1897 W. Murray Crane . 1900 

1900 John L. Bates . . 1903 
1903 Curtis Guild, Jr. . . 1906 
1906 Eben S. Draper . . 1909 
1909 Louis A. Frothingham . 1912 

1912 Robert Luce . . . 1913 

1913 David L Walsh . . 1914 

1914 Edward P. Barry . . 1915 

1915 Grafton D. Gushing . 1916 

1916 Calvin CooHdge . . 1919 
1919 Channing H. Cox . . 1921 
1921 Alvan T. Fuller . . 1925 
1925 Frank G. Allen . .1929 
1929 Wilham S. Youngman . 1933 
1933 Caspar G. Bacon . .1935 
1935 Joseph L. Hurley . . 1937 
1937 Francis E. Kelly . .1939 
1939 Horace T. Cahill . . 1945 
1945 Robert F. Bradford . 1947 
1947 Arthur W. Coolidge . 1949 
1949 Charles F. Jeff Sullivan 1953 
1953 Sumner Gage Whittier . 1957 
1957 Robert F. Murphy** . 1960 
1961 Edward F. McLaughHn.Jr. 

1963 
1963 Francis X. Bellotti 



* The Lieutenant-Governors whose names arc in italics were Acting 
Governors also during vacancies in the office of Governor. 

t Mr. Gill died on the 20th of May, 1800, and the Commonwealth, for 
the only time under the Constitution, was without a Governor and 
Lieutenant-Governor. The Council, Hon. Thomas Dawes, President, 
officiated till the 30th of the month, when Caleb Strong was inaugurated 
Governor. 

X General William Heath was elected in 1806, and declined to accept 
the office. 

§ Acting Governor from April 29, 1874. 

II Acting Governor from March 5, 1896. 

** Appointed Commissioner of the Metropohtan District Commission 
on Oct. 6, 1960. 



310 



United States Setiators. 



UNITED STATES SENATORS. 



FROM MASS. 
Tristram Dalton . . 1789-91 
George Cabot , . 1791-96 
Benjamin Goodhue . 1796-1800 
Jonathan Mason . . 1800-03 
John Quincy Adams . 1803-08 
James Lloyd, Jr. . . 1808-13 
Christopher Gore . . 1813-16 
Eli Porter Ashmun . 1816-18 
Prentiss Mellen . . 1818-20 
Elijah Hunt Mills . 1820-27 

Daniel Webster . . 1827-41 
Rufus Choate . . 1841-45 
Daniel Webster . . 1845-50 
Robert Charles Winthrop 1850-51 
Robert Rantoul, Jr. . 1851 

Charles Sumnerf . . 1851-74 
William B. Washburn . 1874-75 
Henry Laurens Dawes . 1875-93 
Henry Cabot Lodge§ . 1893-1924 
William Morgan Butler 1924-26 
David Ignatius Walsh . 1926-47 
Henry Cabot Lodge. Jr. 1947-1953 
John Fitzgerald Kennedy** 

1953-1960 
Benjamin A. Smith. lift 1960-1963 
Edward M. Kennedy . 1963- 



ACHIJSETTS. 

Caleb Strong . . 1789-96 

Theodore Sedgwick . 1796-99 

Samuel Dexter . . 1799-1800 

Dwight Foster . . 1800-03 

Timothy Pickering , 1803-11 

Joseph Bradley Varnum 1811-17 

Harrison Gray Otis . 1817-22 

James Lloyd . . . 1822-26 

Nathaniel Silsbee . . 1826-35 

John Davis . . . 1835-41 

Isaac Chapman Bates . 1841-45 

John Davis . . . 1845-53 

Edward Everett . . 1853-54 

Julius Rockwell . . 1854-55 

Henry Wilson* . . 1855-73 

George S. Boutwell . 1873-77 

George Frisbie HoarJ . 1877-1904 

Winthrop Murray Crane 1904-13 

John Wingate Weeks . 1913-19 

David Ignatius Walsh . 1919-25 
FrederickHuntingtonGillettl925-31 

Marcus A. Coolidge . 1931-37 

Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr. 1937-44 

Sinclair Weeksif . 1944 

Leverett Saltonstall'! . 1945- 



* Mr. Wilson elected Vice President in 1872; George S. Boutwell chosen 
to fill vacancy. 

t Charles Sumner died March 11. 1874; William B. Washburn chosen 
to fill vacancy April 17, 1874. 

t Mr. Hoar died Sept. 30, 1904; Winthrop Murray Crane appointed 
by Governor John L. Bates Oct. 12, 1904. 

§ Mr. Lodge died Nov. 9, 1924; William Morgan Butler temporarily 
appointed by Governor Channing H. Cox Nov. 13, 1924; Mr. Walsh 
chosen to fill vacancy, Nov. 2, 1926. 

1j Mr. Lodge resigned Feb. 4. 1044; Sinclair Weeks temporarily ap- 
pointed by Governor Leverett Sakourftall Feb. 8, 1944. 

II Mr. Saltonstall's term will expire in January, 1967. 

** Mr. Kennedy elected President of the United States in November, 
1960. Resigned from Senate on December 22, 1960. 

ft Mr. Smith temporarily appointed by Governor Foster Furcolo 
Dec. 27, 1960. 



Secretaries. 



311 



SECRETARIES. 



List of Persons who have held the Office of Secretary of the Com- 
monwealth. 



John Avery . 


. 1780-1806 


Francis DeWitt . 


1856-58 


Jonathan L, Austin 


1806-08 


Oliver Warner 


1858-76 


William Tudor 


1808-10 


Henry B. Peirce . 


1876-91 


Benjamin Homans 


1810-12 


William M. Olin* . 


1891-1911 


Alden Bradford . 


1812-24 


Albert P. Langtry* 


1911-13 


Edward D. Bangs 


1824-36 


Frank J. Donahue 


1913-15 


John P. Bigelow . 


1836-43 


Albert P. Langtry. 


1915-21 


John A. Bolles 


1843-44 


Frederic W. Cook 


1921-49 


John G. Palfrey . 


1844-48 


Edward J. Cronin** 


1949-58 


William B. Calhoun 


1848-51 


J. Henry Goguen** 


1958-59 


Amasa Walker 


1851-53 


Joseph D. Ward*** 


1959-61 


Ephraim M. Wright 


1853-56 


Kevin H. White . 


1961- - 



* Secretary Olin died April 15, 1911; Mr. Langtry chosen to fill va- 
cancy April 26, 1911. 

** Secretary Cronin died Nov. 24, 1958. The vacancy was filled by the 
appointment of J. Henry Goguen, who qualified on Dec. 1, 1958, to^fill 
unexpired term. 

*** Office was filled by election by the Legislature of Joseph D. Ward 
on Jan. 20. 1959. 



312 



Treasurers. 



TREASURERS. 



List of Persons who have held the Office of Treasurer and Receiver 




General. 




Henry Gardner 


1780-83 


Charles Adams, Jr. 


1871-76 


Thomas Ivers 


1783-87 


Charles Endicott . 


1876-81 


Alexander Hodgdon 


1787-92 


Daniel A. Gleason 


1881-86 


Thomas Davis 


1792-97 


Alanson W. Beard 


1886-89 


Peleg Coffin* 


1797-1801 


George A. Marden 


1889-94 


Jonathan Jackson . 


1802-06 


Henry M. Phillipsf 


1894-95 


Thompson J. Skinner 


1806-OS 


Edward P. Shawf 


1895-1900 


Josiah Dwight 


1808-10 


Edward S. Bradford 


1900-05 


Thomas Harris 


1810-11 


Arthur B. ChapinJ 


1905-09 


Jonathan L. Austin 


1811-12 


Elmer A. Stevens^ 


1909-14 


John T. Apthorp . 


1812-17 


Frederick \V. Mansfiek 


1 1914-15 


Daniel Sargent 


1817-22 


Charles L. BurriU 


1915-20 


Nahum Mitchell . 


1822-27 


Fred J. Barren § . 


1920 


Joseph Sewall 


1827-32 


James Jackson 


1920-25 


Hezekiah Barnard 


1832-37 


William S. Youngman 


1 1925-29 


David Wilder 


1837-42 


Karl H. Oliverll . 


1929 


Thomas Russell . 


1842-43 


John W. Haigisll . 


1929-31 


John Mills . 


1843-44 


Charles F. Hurley^ 


1931-37 


Thomas Russell . 


1844-45 


Karl H. Oliver 11 . 


1937 


Joseph Barrett 


1845-49 


William E. HurleyH 


1937-43 


Ebenezer Bradbury 


1849-51 


Francis X. Hurley 


1943-45 


Charles B. Hall . 


1851-53 


John E. Hurley 


1945-47 


Jacob H. Loud 


1853-55 


Laurence Curtis . 


^ 1947-49 


Thomas J. Marsh 


1855-56 


John E. Hurley** 


1949-52 


Moses Tenney, Jr. 


1856-61 


Foster Furcolo** . 


1952-55 


Henry K. Oliver . 


1861-66 


John F. Kennedy . 


1955-61 


Jacob H. Loud 


1866-71 


John Thomas DriscoU 


1961- 



* Secretary Avery had a warrant to take care of the treasury on the 
resignation of Mr. Coffin, May 25, 1802. 

t Mr. Phillips resigned April 12, 1895; Mr. Shaw chosen to fill va- 
cancy April 25, 1895. 

t Mr. Chapin resigned April 1, 1909; Mr. Stevens chosen to fill va- 
cancy April 7, 1909. 

§ ?\Ir. Burrell resigned Sept. 3, 1920; Mr. Jackson appointed to fill 
vacancy Sept. 8, 1920. 

II Mr. Youngman qualified as Lieutenant-Governor Jan. 3, 1929; Mr. 
Oliver chosen to fill vacancy January 7; Mr. Haigis qualified January 16. 

H Mr. Cliarles F. Hurley qualified as Governor, January 7, 1937; 
Mr. Ohver chosen to fill vacancy January 11; Mr, William E. Hurley 
qualified January 20. 

** Mr. John E. Hurley resigned July 5, 1952; Mr. Furcolo appointed 
to fill vacancy July 5, 1952. 



Attorneys-General — Solicitors-General. 313 



ATTORNEYS-GENERAL — SOLICITORS- 
GENERAL. 



[This table was prepared by Mr. A. C. Goodell, Jr., and contributed 
by him to the Massachusetts Historical Society's proceedings for June, 
1895.] 



TABLE OF ATTORNEYS-GENERAL BEFORE THE CON- 
STITUTION. 



APPOINTED. 



Anthony Checkley . April 29, 1680. 

Under the Presidency of Joseph Dudley: 



Benjamin Bullivant 



Under Sir Edmund Andros: 
Giles Masters 



James Graham 



James Graham . . . . . 

During the inter-charter period: 
Anthony Checkley . June 14, 1689. 

Under the Province Charter: 
Anthony Checkley . . . . 

Paul Dudley 

Paul Dudley . . June 8, 1716. 

Paul Dudley . .June 19, 1717. 



Date uncertain, but before 
July 1, 1686; sworn in 
July 26. 

"To frame indictments, 
arraign and prosecute 
felons." April 30, 1687. 
He died "Kings Attor- 
ney," Feb. 29, 1688. 

Date uncertain, but as early 
as Aug. 25, 1687, he was 
"settled in Boston and 
made Attorney-general." 

Reappointed (2d commis- 
sion) June 20, 1688. 



Oct. 28, 1692. 
July 6. 1702. 



314 A ttorneys-General — Solicitor s-GeneraL 



APPOINTED. 



Paul Dudley* 



John Valentine 
John Valentine 
Thomas Newtonf . 

{Vacancy; John 
John Overing 
John Read . 

{Vacancy; John 
John Read . 
John Read . 
John Read . 
Joseph Hiller 



June 25, 1718. 



, Nov. 22. 1718. 
. June 24, 1719. 
, June 19, 1720. 
Read chosen but negatived by Governor Shute.) 
. June 29, 1722. 
. June 20, 1723. 
Read chosen, but not consented to.) 
, June 28, 1725. 
June 21, 1726. 
June 28, 1727. 
June 19, 1728. 
(Addington Davenport, Jr., chosen June 12, but declined.) 

John Overing June 26, 1729. 

(Jeremiah Gridley and others were chosen annually from 1730 to 1748, 
but the Governor withheld his consent. See Proceedings of the Massa- 
chusetts Historical Society, Vol. X, Second Series, p. 254.) 

Edmund Trowbridge June 29, 1749. 

Edmund Trowbridge May 14, 1762. 

(Made Justice of the Superior Court of Judicature, March 25, 1767.) 

Jeremiah GridleyJ March 25, 1767. 

Jonathan Sewall Nov. 18, 1767. 

{Vacancy from September, 1774, to June 12, 1777.) 
Robert Treat Paine . June 12, 1777, . Accepted Aug. 26. 

Robert Treat Paine . June 19, 1778 (sworn) 
Robert Treat Paine . Feb. 5, 1779. 
Robert Treat Paine . Jan. 4, 1780. 



Special Attorney-General, etc. 
Jonathan Sewall March 25, 1767. 



SOLICITORS-GENERAL, ETC. 

Jonathan Sewall ....... June 24, 1767. 

{Vacancy from November 18, 1767, to March 14, 1771.) 
Samuel Quincy§ March 14,' 1771. 



* Resigned Nov. 22, 1718. % Died Sept. 10. 1767. 

t Died May 28, 1721. § A refugee, 1774-75. 



Attorneys-General — Solicitors-General. 315 



Solicitor-General (Since the Constitution). 



Daniel Davis ....... 

(Office established in 1800. and abolished in 1832.) 



1801-32 



TABLE OF ATTORNEYS-GENERAL SINCE THE CONSTI- 
TUTION. 



Robert Treat Paine 


. 1780-90 


Herbert Parker 


1902-06 


James Sullivan 


1790-1807 


Dana Malone 


1906-11 


Barnabas Bidwell . 


. 1807-10 


James M. Swift . 


1911-14 


Perez Morton 


. 1810-32 


Thomas J. Boynton 


1914-15 


James T. Austin . 


. 1832-43 


Henry C. Attwillll 


1915-19 


John Henry Clifford 


* 1849-5 3 


Henry A. Wymanll 


1919-20 


Rufus Choatet 


. 1853-54 


J. Weston Allen . 


1920-23 


John Henry Clififordf 


. 1854-58 


Jay R. Benton 


1923-27 


Stephen Henry Phillips 


. 1858-61 


Arthur K. Reading^! 


1927-28 


Dwighi Foster 


. 1861-64 


Joseph E. Warner^ 


1928-35 


Chester I. ReedJ . 


. 1864-67 


Paul A. Dever 


1935-41 


Charles AllenJ 


. 1867-72 


Robert T. Bushnell 


1941-45 


Charles R. Train . 


. 1872-79 


Clarence A. Barnes 


1945-49 


George Marston . 


. 1879-83 


Francis E. Kelly . 


1949-53 


Edgar J. Sherman § 


. 1883-87 


George Fingold** . 


1953-58 


Andrew J. Waterman § 


. 1887-91 


Edward J. McCormack 




Albert E. Pillsbury 


. 1891-94 


Jr.** 


1958-63 


Hosea M. Knowlton 


1894-1902 


Edward W. Brooke 


1963- 



♦ The office of Attorney-General was abolished in 1843 and re-estab- 
lished in 1849. 

t Rufus Choate resigned May 12, 1854. Mr. Clifford's terra began 
May 20. 1854. 

X Resigned April 20, 1867. The vacancy was filled by election by 
the Legislature of Charles Allen April 26, 1867. 

§ Resigned Oct. 1. 1887. The vacancy was filled by the appointment 
of Andrew J. Waterman. 

II Vacated the office Aug. 13, 1919. by qualifying as a member of the 
Public Service Commission. The vacancy was filled by the appointment 
of Henry A. Wyman. who qualified on that day. 

H Resigned June 6, 1928. The vacancy was filled by the choice 
June 13. of Joseph E. Warner. 

** Attorney-General Fingold died Aug, 31, 1958. The vacancy was 
filled by election by the Legislature of Edward J. McCormack, Jr., on 
September 11. 1958. 



316 



Auditors. 



AUDITORS 



List of Persons who have held the office of Auditor of 
Accounts or Auditor of the Commonwealth. 



[Established by Act of 1849. Name changed by Act of 1908.) 



David Wilder. Jr. 
Joseph Mitchell 
Stephen N. Gifford 
Chandler R. Ransom 
Charles W hite 
Levi Reed* . 
Julius L. Clarke 
Henry S. Briggs 
Charles Endicott 
Julius L. Clarket 
Charles R. Laddt 



1849- 


-54 1 


1854-55 1 


1855- 


-56 


1856- 


-58 


1858- 


-61 


1861- 


-65 


1865- 


-66 


1866- 


-70 


1870- 


-76 


1876- 


-79 


1879- 


-91 



William D. T. Trefry . 1891-92 



John W. Kimball . 1892-1901 


Henry E. TurnerJ 


1901-11 


John E. White! • 


1911-14 


Frank H. Pope 


1914-15 


Alonzo B. Cook . 


1915-31 


Francis X. Hurley 


1931-35 


Thomas H. Buckley 


1935-39 


Russell A. Wood . 


1939-41 


Thomas J. Buckley 


1941- 



* Resigned Dec. 20, 1865. 

t Mr. Clarke resigned, and Mr. Ladd was appointed in his place 
May 5, 1879. 

t Mr. Turner died June 29, 1911, and Mr. White was chosen to fdl 
the vacancy July 6, 1911. 



Organization of the Legislature. 



317 



ORGANIZATION OF THE LEGISLATURE, 

Since 1780. 



The first General Court, under the Constitution of The Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts, assembled at Boston on Wednesday, Oct. 
25, 1780, and was finally prorogued (having held three sessions) May 
19, 1781. From this time until 1832 the political year commenced on 
the last Wednesday in May, and the General Court held two, and fre- 
quently three, sessions during each year. In 1832, by an amendment 
of the Constitution, the commencement of the political year was 
changed to the first Wednesday in January. 



SENATE. 



S I D E N T S . 



Thomas Cushing, res'n 
Jeremiah Powell . 
Jeremiah Powell, res'n' 
Samuel Adams 
Samuel Adams 
Samuel Adams, resign' 
Samuel Phillips, Jr. 
Samuel Phillips, Jr. 
Samuel Adams 
Samuel Phillips, Jr. 
Samuel Phillips 
Samuel Phillips, res'n' 
David Cobb 
David Cobb 
Harrison Gray Otis 
John Bacon . 
Samuel Dana 
Harrison Gray Otis 
Samuel Dana 
John Phillips 
Nathaniel Silsbee . 



'd* 


1 1780-81 


•d* 


S'1781-82 




1782-85 


'd* 


1-1785-86 


. 


1786-87 


. 


1787-88 




1788-90 


1790-1801 1 


dt 


^1801-02 




1802-05 




1805-06 




1806-07 




1807-08 




1808-11 




1811-13 




1813-23 




1823-26 



John Mills . 


1826-28 


Sherman Leland . 


1828-29 


Samuel Lathrop . 


1829-30 


Samuel Lathrop, resign'a 


> 1830-31 


James Fowler 


/ 


Leverett Saltonstall 


1831 


William Thorndike 


1832 


Benjamin T. Pickman 


1833-34 


Benjamin T. Pickman, 


^'^^}l835 


George Bliss 


Horace Mann 


1836-37 


Myron Lawrence . 


1838-39 


Daniel P. King . 


1840-41 


Josiah Quincy, Jr. 


1842 


Phineas W. Lelana, resii 


"^^^11843 


Frederick Robinson 


Josiah Quincy, Jr. 


1844 


Levi Lincoln 


1845 


William B. Calhoun 


1846-47 


Zeno Scudder 


1848 


Joseph Bell . 


1849 



* Resigned to serve in Governor's Council, 
t Resigned to serve as Lieutenant-Governor. 



318 



Organization of the Legislature. 



Marshall P. Wilder 


1850 


George E. Smith . 


1898-1900 


Henry Wilson 


1851-52 


Rufus A. Soule 


. 1901-02 


Charles H. \^'arren 


1853 


George R. Jones . 


. 1903-04 


Charles Edward Cook 


1854 


William F. Dana . 


. 1905-06 


Henry W. Benchley 


1855 


William D. Chappie 


. 1907-08 


Elihu C. Baker . 


1856 


Allen T. Treadway 


. 1909-11 


Charles W. Upham 


1857-58 


Levi H. Greenwood 


. 1912-13 


Charles A. Phelps 


1859-60 


Calvin Coolidge . 


. 1914-15 


WiUiam Claflin . 


1861 


Henry G. \^'ells . 


. 1916-18 


John H. Clifford . 


1862 


Edwin T. McKnight 


. 1919-20 


Jonathan E. Field 


1863-65 


Frank G. Allen 


.tl921-24 


Joseph A. Pond 


1866-67 


\A'ellinKton Wells . 


. 1925-28 


George O. Brastow 


1868 


Caspar G. Bacon . 


. 1929-32 


Robert C. Pitman, resig 


"•'^*}l869 


Erland F. Fish 


1933-34 


George O. Brastow 


James G. Moran . 


1935-36 


Horace H. Coolidge 


1870-72 


Samuel H. Wragg 


1937-38 


George B. Loring . 


1873-76 


Joseph R. Cotton . 


1939-40 


John B. D. Cogswell 


1877-79 


Angier L. Goodwint 


1941 


Robert R. Bishop 


1880-82 


Jarvis Hunt'^ 


. 1942-44 


George Glover Crocker 


1883 


Arthur W. Coolidge 


1945-46 


George A. Bruce . 


1884 


Donald W. Nicholson! I 


1947 


Albert E. Pillsbury 


1885-86 


Harris S. Richardson*^ 


1948 


Halsey J. Boardman 


1887-88 


Chester A. Dolan, Jr. 


1949 


Harris C. Hartwell 


1889 


Harris S. Richardson 


1950 


Henry H. Sprague 


1890-91 


Richard I. Furbush 


1951-56 


Alfred S. Pinkerton 


1892-93 


Newland H. Holmes 


1957-58 


William M. Butler 


1894-95 


John E. Powers 


1959-^ i/ (^ 


George P. Lawrence 


1896-97 


~0^'-^ ^ ■■ ■ \^ 


u'f - 




CLERKS. 




William Baker, Jr. 


1780-84 


Nathaniel Coffin . 


1808-10 


Samuel Cooper 


1785-95 


Marcus Morton 


1811-12 


Edward McLane . 


1796-99 


Samuel F. McCleary 


1813-21 


Edward Payne Hayman 


1800 


Samuel F. Lyman 


1822 


George Elliot Vaughan 


1801-02 


Paul Willard 


1823-29 


Wendell Davis 


1803-05 


Cliarles Calhoun . 


1830-42 


John D. Dunbar , 


1806-07 


Lewis Josselyn 


1843 



* Appointed Justice of Superior Court. 

t First year under biennial elections. 

t Resigned Dec. 29, 1941 (elected to Congress). 

i Elected at Special Session, Jan. 26, 1942. 

I! Resigned Nov. 26, 1947 (elected to Congress). 

II Elected Jan. 7, 1948. 



Organization of the Legislature. 



319 



Charles Calhoun . . 1844-50 

Chauncy L. Knapp . 1851 

Francis H. Underwood . 1852 

Charles Calhoun . . 1853-54 

Peter L. Cox . .1855-57 

Stephen N. Giflford* . 1858-86 



E. Herbert Clappt 
Henry D. CoolidgeJ 
William H. Sanger§ 

Irving N. Haydenll 
Thomas A. Chadwick 



. 1886-88 
1889-1922 
. 1922-32 
. 1932-62 
. 1962- 



Samuel Cooper 
John Clark . 
Joseph Eckley 
Samuel Cooper 
Joseph Eckley 
Peter Thacher 
Samuel Stillman 
Jeremy Belknap 
Peter Thacher 
William Emerson 
Thomas Baldwin 
Joseph S. Buckminster 
Thomas Baldwin . 
Joshua Huntington 
Dr. John Lathrop 
Francis Parkman 
Henry Ware, Jr. 
John G. Palfrey 
John Pierpont 
James Walker 
William Jenks 
Daniel Sharp 
Samuel Barrett 
Francis Wayland 
William Jenks 
R. W. Emerson 
Howard Malcolm 
Alonzo Potter 
F. W. P. Greenwood 



C H A P L 

1780 
1781 
1782 
1783 
1784 

1785-89 

1790 

1791 

792-1802 

1803-06 
1807 

1808-10 

1811-12 
1813 

1814-15 

1816-17 
1818 

1819-20 
1821 
1822 
1823 
1824 
1825 
1826 

1827-28 
1829 
1830 
1831 
1832 



George W. Blagden 
Chandler Robbins 
Hubbard Winslow. 
F. W. P. Greenwood 
Nehemiah Adams 
Ralph Sanger 
William M. Rogers 
Daniel M. Lord 
Thomas M. Clark, Jr. 
Joseph H. Towne . 
William M. Rogers 
James F. Clarke . 
John T. Burrill 
Amos Smith 
Austin Phelps 
C. A. Bartol 
Isaac P. Langworthy 
James L. T. Coolidge 
A. L. Stone . 
Warren Burton 
J. S. D. Farnsworth 
A. H. Burlingham 
Lyman Whiting 
Daniel C. Eddy . 
John P. Cleveland 
Arthur Fuller 
Jacob M. Manning 
Joseph Marsh 
A. S. Patton. 



1833 
1834 
1835 
1836 
1837 
1838 
1839 
1840 
1841 
1842 
1843 
1844 
1845 
1846 
1847 
1848 
1849 
1S50 
1851 
1852 
1853 
1854 
1855 
1856 
1857 
1858 
1859 
1860 
1861 



* Died April 18, 1886. 

t Elected April 29, 1886, having served as assistant clerk since 1880. 

t Died Feb. 7, 1922. 

? h,!ected March 1, 1922, having served as assistant clerk since 1889; 
retired March 12. 1932. 

I i Elected March 14, 1932, having served as assistant clerk since 1922; 
retired January 31, 1962. 

Elected Feb. 1, 1962, having served as assistant clerk since 1932. 



320 



Organization of the Legislature. 



Edward W. Clark 


1862-63 


A. A. Miner 


1864 


George E. Ellis . 


1865 


James B. Miles . 


1866 


Charles E. Reed . 


1867 


Henry Morgan 


1868 


E. N. Kirk . 


1869 


J. O. Means 


1870 


S. W. Foljambe . 


1871 


Edward Abbott . 


1872-73 


A. M. Ide . 


1874 


George F. Warren 


1875 



Isaac Dunham 


. 1876-79 


Edmund Dowse* . 


1880-1904 


Edward A. Hortonll 


1904-28 


Charles H. Moss If 


1928-30 


Arthur M. Ellis . 


1931-40 


Arthur W. Olsen . 


1941-42 


W. Harold Deacon 


1943-44 


Frederick M. Eliot 


1945-48 


Francis A. Burke . 


1949-50 


Frederick M. Eliot** 


1951-58 


John P. Robertson*** 


1958 


Christopher P. Griffin 


1959- 



HOUSE OF DEPUTIES 
(Usually two to five sessions a year.) 

SPEAKERS. 



William Hawthornef 


. 1644-45 


Thomas Clarke 


1662 


George Cooke 


1645 


John Leverett 


1663-64 


William Hawthornef 


1646 


Thomas Clarke 


1665 


Robert Bridges 


1646 


Richard Waldron§ 


1666-68 


Joseph Hill . 


1647 


Thomas Clarke . 


1669-70 


William Hawthornef 


1648 


Thomas Savage 


1671 


Richard Russell . 


1648 


Thomas Clarke 


1672 


Daniel DenisonJ . 


1649 


Richard Waldron§ 


1673 


William Hawthornef 


1650 


Joshua Hubbard . 


1673-74 


Daniel Gookin 


1651 


Richard Waldron§ 


1674-75 


Daniel DenisonJ . 


1651-52 


Peter Buckley 


1675-76 


Humphrey Atherton 


1653 


Thomas Savage 


1677-78 


Richard Russell . 


1654 


Richard Waldron§ 


1679 


Edward Johnson . 


1655 


John Richards 


1679-80 


Richard Russell . 


1656 


Daniel Fisher 


1680-82 


William Hawthornef 


1657 


Elisha Cooke 


1683 


Richard Russell 


1658 


John Wayte 


1684 


Thomas Savage 


1659-60 


Isaac Addington . 


1685 


William Hawthornef 


1660-61 


John Saffin . 


1686 



* Resigned Jan. 13, 1904, 

f Also spelled Hauthorne, Hawtherne, Hawthorn, Hathorne. 
% Also spelled Dennison. 
§ Also spelled Waldern, Walderne. 

II Elected Jan. 14, 1904, resigned and chosen Chaplain emeritus 
Feb. 6, 1928. 

If Elected Feb. 7. 1928, 
** Died Feb. 17, 1958. 
*** Elected to fill vacancy on Feb. 25, 1958. 



Organization of the Legislature. 



321 



I N T E R - C H A R T E R PERIOD. 

The General Court adjourned May 21, 1686, and did not convene 
until May or June, 1689. 



Thomas Oakes 


1689 


William Bond 


. 1691-92 


John Bowles 


. 1689-90 


Penn Townsend . 


1692 


Penn Townsend 


. 1690-91 






UNDER THE SECOND CHARTER. 




William Bond 


. 1692-93 


John Clark . 


1721-24 


Nathaniel Byfield 


, 1693-94 


William Dudley . 


1724-29 


Nehemiah Jewett 


. 1694-95 


John Quincy 


1729-41 


William Bond 


. 1695-96 


William Fairfield . 


1741 


Penn Townsend 


. 1696-97 


John Hobson 


1741-42 


Nathaniel Byfield 


1698 


Thomas Cushing . 


1742-46 


James Converse 


1699-1700 


Thomas Hutchinson 


1746-49 


John Leverett 


. 1700-01 


Joseph Dwight 


1749-50 


Nehemiah Jewett 


. 1701-02 


Thomas Hubbard 


1750-59 


James Converse 


. 1702-05 


Samuel White 


1759-60 


Thomas Oakes 


. 1705-07 


James Otis . . 


1760-62 


John Burrill 


1707 


Timothy Ruggles . 


1762-64 


Thomas Oliver 


1708-09 


Samuel White 


1764-66 


John Clark . 


. 1709-11 


Thomas Cushing* 


1766-74 


John Burrill. 


. 1711-20 


James Warren 


1775-78 


Elisha Cooke 


1720 


John Pickering 


1778-79 


Timothy Lindall 


. 1720-21 


John Hancock 


1779-80 


HC 


)USE OF REP 


RESENTATIVES. 




SP E A KE 


RS UNDER T 


HE CONSTITUTION. 


Caleb Davis, resigr 


led . 1780-82 


Harrison Gray Otis 


1803-05 


Nathaniel Gorham 


. 1782-83 


Timothy Bigelow . 


1805-06 


Tristram Dalton 


. 1783-84 


Perez Morton 


1806-08 


Samuel Allyne Otis 


. 1784^85 


Timothy Bigelow . 


1808-10 


Nathaniel Gorham 


. 1785-86 


Perez Morton, resigned 


1810-11 


Artemas Ward 


. 1786-87 


Joseph Story, resigned 


1811-12 


James Warren 


. 1787-88 


Eleazer W. Ripley 


1812 


Theodore Sedgwicl 


: . 1788-89 


Timothy Bigelow . 


1812-20 


David Cobb 


. 1789-93 


Elijah H. Mills, resignec 


i 1820-21 


Edward H. Robbin 


s 1793-1802 


Josiah Quincy, resigned 


1821-22 


John Coffin Jones 


. 1802-03 


Luther Lawrence . 


1822 



♦ Son of Thomas Cushing who served in 1742-46. 



322 



Organization of the Legislature. 



Levi Lincoln 


1822-23 


John D. Long 


1876-78 


William C. Jarvis . 


1823-25 


Levi C. Wade 


1879 


Timothy Fuller 


1825-26 


Charles J. Noyes . 


1880-82 


William C. Jarvis . 


1826-28 


George A. Mar den 


1883-84 


William B. Calhoun 


1828-34 


John Q. A. Brackett 


1885-86 


Julius Rockwell 


1835-37 


Charles J. Noyes . 


1887-88 


Robert C. Winthrop 


1838-40 


William E. Barrett 


1889-93 


George Ashmun . 


1841 


George V. L. Meyer 


1894-96 


Thomas Kinnicut . 


1842 


John L. Bates 


1897-99 


Daniel P. King . 


1843 


James J. Myers 


1900-03 


Thomas Kinnicut, res'n'c 


I 1844 


Louis A. Frothingham 


1904-05 


Samuel H. Walley. Jr. 


1844-46 


John N. Cole 


1906-08 


Ebenezer Bradbury 


1847 


Joseph Walker 


1909-11 


Francis B. Crowninshielc 


I 1848-49 


Grafton D. Gushing 


1912-14 


Ensign H. Kellogg 


1850 


Channing H. Cox . 


1915-18 


Nathaniel P. Banks, Jr 


. 1851-52 


Joseph E. W^arner 


1919-20 


George Bliss 


1853 


Benjamin Loring Young* 1921-24 


Otis P. Lord 


1854 


John C. Hull 


1925-28 


Daniel C. Eddy . 


1855 


Leverett Saltonstall 


1929-36 


Charles A. Phelps 


1856-57 


Horace T. Cahill . 


1937-38 


Julius Rockwell 


1858 


Christian A. Herter 


1939-42 


Charles Hale 


1859 


Rudolph F. King . 


1943-44 


John A. Goodwin . 


1860-61 


Frederick B. Willisf 


1945-48 


Alexander H. Bullock 


1862-65 


Thomas P. O'Neill, Jr. 


1949-52 


James M, Stone 


1866-67 


Charles Gibbons . 


1953-54 


Harvey Jewell 


1868-71 


Michael F. Skerry** 


1955-57 


John E. Saiiford . 


1872-75 


John F. Thompson*** 


1958- 




CLE 


R KS. 




Andrev/ Henshaw . 


1780-81 


Lewis Josselyn 


1851-52 


George Richards Minot 


1782-91 


William Schouler . 


1853 


Henry Warren . 1 


792-1802 


William Stowe 


1854 


Nicholas Tillinghast 


1803-05 


Henry A. Marsh . 


1855 


Chas. Pinckney Sumner 


1806-07 


William E. P. Haskell 


1856 


Nicholas Tillinghast 


1808-09 


William Stowe 


1857-61 


Chas. Pinckney Sumner 


1810-11 


William S. Robinson 


1862-72 


Benjamin Pollard . 


1812-21 


Charles H. Taylor 


1873 


Pel ham W. Warren 


1822-31 


George A. Marden 


1874-82 


Luther S. Gushing 


1832-43 


Edward A. McLaughlin 


1883-95 


Charles W. Storey 


1844-50 


George T. Sleeper 


1896 



* First year under biennial elections. 

t Resigned November 9, 1948. 
** Resigned as Speaker October 14, 1957. 
•** Elected Speaker January 1. 1958. 



Organization of the Legislature. 



323 



James W. Kimball* 
Frank E. Bridgmanf 



1897-1928 
. 1928-39 



Lawrence R. GroveJ 
William C. Maiers** 



. 1939-61 
. 1961- 



CHAPLAINS, 



Samuel Cooper 


1780 


§ 


1829 


John Cla-k . 


1781 


Joseph Tuckerman 


1830 


Joseph Eckley 


1782 


II 


1831 


Samuel Cooper 


1783 


Ralph W. Emerson 


1832 


Joseph Eckley 


1 784 


Howard Malcolm . 


1832-33 


Peter Thacher 


. 1785-89 


Edward T. Taylor 


1834 


Samuel Stillman 


1790 


George W. Blagden 


1835 


Jeremy Belknap 


1791 


Ezra S. Gannett . 


1835 


Peter Thacher 


. 1792-93 


Samuel K. Lothrop 


1836 


Samuel Stillman 


. 1794-95 


William M. Rogers 


1836 


Peter Thacher 


. 1796-99 


Baron Stow . 


1837 


Thomas Baldwin 


. 1800-01 


Thomas S. King . 


1837 


John T. Kirkland 


1802 


Ephraim Peabody 


1838 


Thomas Baldwin 


1803 


George W. Blagden 


1839 


John T. Kirkland 


1804 


Otis A. Skinner . 


1839 


Thomas Baldwin 


. 1805-07 


Joy H. Fairchild . 


1840 


Charles Lowell 


1808 


Benjamin Whittemoie 


1840 


John Lathrop 


1809 


Joseph H. Towne . 


1841 


Thomas Baldwin 


1810 


Robert C. Waterstcn 


1842 


Elijah R. Sabin 


1811 


Edwin H. Chapin 


1842 


Horace Holly 


1812 


Edward N. Kirk . 


1843 


Joshua Huntington 


1813 


Frederic D. Huntington 


1843 


Samuel Cary 


1814 


Austin Phelps 


1844 


Samuel C. Thacher 


1815 


Chandler Robbins 


1845 


Asa Eaton . 


1816 


William Hague 


1845 


Daniel Sharp 


1817 


William Jenks 


1846 


Thomas Baldwin 


1818 


Samuel D. Robbins 


1846 


William Jenks 


. 1819-26 


George Richards . 


1847 


George Ripley 


1827 


Silas Aiken . 


1848 


Henry Ware. Jr. 


1828 


S. Hale Higgins 


1848 


* Died April 4, 

t Elected Anril 

retired March 28. 1 

{ Elected Mar 


1928. 

10, 1928. having 

939. 

:h 28. 1939, ha\ 


served as assistant clerk s 
'ing served as assistant c 


nee 1897; 

erk since 



1928; retired May 26, 1961. 

** Elected May 26, 1961, liaving served as assistant clerk since 1946. 

§ There was no choice, and it was ordered, after balloting, that all the 
settled clergymen of Boston be invited by the Speaker to officiate alter- 
nately as Chaplain. 

II There was no choice, and it was ordered, after balloting, that the 
three clergymen having the highest votes should act as joint Chaplains. 
These were Lyman Beecher. Sebastian Strceter and Ezra S. Gannett. 



324 



Organization of the Legislature. 



Rollin H. Neale . 


1849 


John A. M. Chapman 


1870 


Henry V. Degen . 


1850 


Charles C. Sewall . 


1871 


George M. Randall 


1851 


Warren H. Cudworth 


1872 


Rufu3 W. Clark . 


1852 


Robert G. Seymour 


. 1873-78 


Stephen Lovell 


1853 


Daniel W. Waldron 


1879-1918 


Arthur B. Fuller . 


1854 


William F. Dusseault 


. 1919-22 


John H. Twombly 


1855 


Donald B. Aldrich 


. 1923-24 


Abraham D. Merrill 


1856 


Harry W. Kimball 


. 1925-28 


Daniel Foster 


1857 


Gardiner M, Day . 


1929 


Warren Burton 


1858 


Abbot Peterson . 


. 1930-32 


Thomas Dodge 


1859 


Dan Huntington Fenn 


. 1933-36 


Warren Burton 


1860 


J. Caleb Justice 


. 1937-38 


Andrew L. Stone . 


1861 


Cornelius P. Trowbridge 1939-42 


Phineas Stowe 


1862 


Howard P. Horn* 


1943 


George S. Ball 


. . 1863 


Howard P. Bozarth* 


. 1943-44 


David Bremner 


1864 


Elmore Brown 


. 1945-48 


Samuel F. Upham . 


1865 


Richard J. Quinlan 


. 1949-52 


Noah M. Gaylord 


1866 


Arthur Joseph Snow 


. 1953-54 


Pliny Wood . 


1867 


Christopher P. Griffin 


. 1955-58 


WiUiam R. Alger . 


1868 


George V. Kerr . 


. 1959- 


Orin T. Walker . 


1869 






SERGEANTS 


5 - A T - A R M S .t 




Benjamin Stevens 


. 1835-59 


Thomas F. Pedrick§ 


. 1910-20 


John Morrissey 


. 1859-74 


James Beatty§ 


1920 


Oreb F. Mitchell . 


. 1875-85 


Charles 0. Holt If . 


. 1921-49 


John G. B. Adamst 


1886-1900 


Arthur R. Driscoll 


. 1949-62 


Charles G. DavisJ 


. 1901-03 


Leopold Lepore 


. 1962- 


David T. Remington 


. 1904-09 






SERGEANT- 


A T - A R M 


S FOR THE HOUSE. 


Octave O. Desma 


raisll . 1949-52 





* Resigned April 29, 1943. Mr. Bozarth was appointed to fill the 
vacancy, May 18, 1943. 

^ t The office of Sergeant-at-Arms was established by law in 1835. Pre- 
vious to that time Jacob Kuhn was Messenger to the General Court 
from 1786. William Baker preceded him from the first ses<5ion under 
the Constitution in 1780-81, he having also served in a similar position 
for many years previously thereto. 

% Mr. Adams died Oct. 19, 1900. Mr. Davis was appointed Acting 
Sergeant-at-Arms Oct. 24, 1900. 

§ Mr. Pedrick died Feb. 22, 1920. Mr. Beatty was chosen to fill the 
vacancy. March 10, 1920. 

U Resigned March 21, 1949. Mr. Driscoll was elected to fill the 
vacancy, August 31, 1949. 

Retired March 8, 1962. Mr. Lepore was elected to fill vacancy 
April 25, 1962. 

II The office of Sergeant-at-Arms for the House was established by 
Chapter 806 of the Acts oi 1949. 



Length of Legislative Sessions, Etc. 



325 



Table showing the Length of the Session of the Legislature in 
Each Year since 1832. 



Year 


Convened 


Prorogued 


Total 
Days 


No. of 
Reps. 


1832 .... 


January 4 


March 24 


80 


528 


1833 










2 


28 


86 


574 


1834 












April 2 


92 


570 


1835* 












8 


92 


615 


1836 












16 


102 


619 


1837 












20 


107 


635 


1838 










3 


25 


113 


480 


1839 










•^ 


10 


99 


521 


1840 












March 24 


84 


521 


1841 












18 


72 


397 


1842* 












3 


58 


336 


1843 












24 


80 


352 


1844 












16 


74 


321 


1845 












26 


85 


271 


1846 












April 16 


100 


264 


1847 












16 


111 


255 


1848* 












May 10 


127 


272 


1849 












2 


120 


263 


1850 












3 


122 


297 


1851 












24 


146 


396 


1852 












22 


137 


402 


1853 












25 


142 


288 


1854 












April 29 


116 


310 


1855 












May 21 


138 


380 


1856 












June 6 


158 


329 


1857* 












May 30 


144 


357 



♦ There was an extra session of sixty-two days in 1835, to revise the 
statutes; one of nine days in 1842, to divide the Commonwealth into 
Congressional Districts; one of three days in 1848, to choose electors of 
President and Vice-President; one of eighteen days in 1857, to establish 
districts for the choice of Councillors, Representatives and Senators; one 
of one hundred and thirteen days in 1859, to revise the general statutes; 
one of fourteen days in 1860, to consider the subject of the disease among 
the cattle of the Commonwealth; one of ten days in 1861, to consider the 
duty of the Commonwealth in relation to public affairs, consequent on 
the Rebellion; one of eight days in 1863, to provide for raising the quota 
under the call of the President of the United States of the 17th of Oc- 
tober, 1863, for 300,000 men; one of thirty days in 1872, to consider 
what legislation was necessary by reason of the great fire in Boston, 
November 9 and 10; one of ten days in 1881 and one of seven days in 
1901. to act upon the report of a joint special committee to revise the 
statutes; one of three days in 1916, to legislate for Massachusetts 
soldiers called to the Mexican border and to provide for the reappor- 
tionment of Suffolk County into Representative districts; one of 
thirty-six days in 1919, to consider the street railway situation, the 



326 



Length of Legislative Sessions, Etc. 



Year 


Convened 


Prorogued 


Total 
Days 


No. of 
Reps. 


1858t .... 


6 


March 27 


81 


240t 


1859* 










5 


April 6 


92 


- 


1860* 










4 


4 


92 


— 


1861* 










2 


11 


100 


- 


1862 










1 


30 


120 


— 


1863* 










7 


29 


113 


— 


1864 










6 


May 14 


1.^0 


^- 


1865 










4 


17 


137 


— 


1866 










3 


30 


147 


- 


1867 










2 


June 1 


150 


— 


1868 










1 


12 


164 


- 


1869 










6 


24 


170 


- 


1870 










5 


23 


170 


- 


1871 










4 


May 31 


148 


- 


1872* 










3 


7 


126 


— 


1873 










1 


June 12 


163 


— 


1874 










7 


30 


175 


— 


1875 










6 


May 19 


134 


- 


1876 










5 


April 28 


115 


— 


1877 










3 


May 17 


135 


- 


1878 










2 


17 


136 


- 


1879 










1 


April 30 


120 


- 


1880 










7 


24 


109 


— 


1881* 










5 


May 13 


129 


— 


1882 










4 


27 


144 


- 


1883 










3 


July 27 


206 


- 


1884 . 










2 


June 4 


155 


- 


1885 . 










7 


19 


164 


— 


1886 . 










6 


30 


176 


— 


1887 . 










5 


16 


163 


- 


1888 . 










4 


May 29 


147 


— 


1889 . 










2 


June 7 


157 


- 


1890 . 










1 


July 2 


183 


— 


1891 . 










7 


June 11 


156 


" 



compensation of the State Guard for special duty in Boston, the appro- 
priations of cities and towns for compensating school teachers and for 
other municipal purposes, the recognition of Provincetown in the 
Pilgrim Tercentenary celebration, etc.; one of sixteen days in 1920, 
to act upon the report of a joint special committee to revise the General 
Laws; one of three hours on October 20, 1930, to commemorate the 
tercentenary of the first General Court held in Massachusetts; one 
of forty-six days in 1931, to consider changing the law relative to rates 
for compulsory motor vehicle liability insurance; one of twenty-seven 
days in 1933, to consider regulation and control of the liquor trahic; 
one of three days in 1938, to provide funds for the devastation caused 
by hurricane and floods; one of six days in 1942, to provide for the 
safety of the Commonwealth during the existence of the war emergency ; 

j- The number of Representatives has been 240 since 1858. 



Length of Legislative Sessions, Etc. 



327 













Days of 


Year 


Convened 


Prorogued 


Total 
Days 


Sitting 








Senate 


House 


1892 


January 6 


June 17 


163 j 


112 


112 


1893 






4 


9 


157 


107 


107 


1894 






3 


July 2 


181 


121 


126 


1895 






2 


June 5 


155 


102 


107 


1896 






1 


10 


162 


112 


112 


1897 






6 


12 


158 


108 


110 


1898 






5 


23 


170 


115 


120 


1899 






4 


3 


151 


104 


104 


1900 






3 


July 17 


196 


131 


133 


1901* 






2 


June 19 


169 


114 


117 


1902 






1 


28 


179 


123 


124 


1903 






7 


26 


171 


119 


121 


1904 






6 


9 


156 


109 


110 


1905 






4 


May 26 


143 


101 


101 


1906 






3 


June 29 


178 


123 


123 


1907 






2 


28 


178 


125 


125 


1908 






1 


13 


165 


117 


119 


1909 






6 


19 


165 


116 


116 


1910 






5 


15 


162 


114 


114 


1911 






4 


July 28 


206 


140 


141 


1912 






3 


June 13 


163 


113 


112 


1913 






1 


20 


171 


120 


120 


1914 






7 


July 7 


182 


127 


126 


1915 






6 


June 4 


150 


104 


104 


1916* 






5 


2 


150 


105 


105 


1917 






3 


May 26 


144 


101 


101 


1918 






2 


June 3 


153 


107 


107 


1919* 






1 


July 25 


206 


144 


144 


1920* 






7 


June 5 


151 


108 


105 


1921 






5 


May 28 


144 


100 


100 


1922 






4 


June 13 


161 


110 


111 



one of fifteen days in 1944, to facilitate voting by citizens in the armed 
forces, and to issuance of licenses based upon safety of places of public 
assembly; one of six days in 1952 to repeal provisions of law providing 
pensions or retirement allowances for members of the General Court and 
other elected state officials and to revise the laws providing travel and 
other expenses for members and employees of tiie legislative branch; 
one of one day in 1 954 to provide funds for the alleviation of ihe destruc- 
tion caused by the hurricane and to revise the law relative to the retire- 
ment of certain veterans of World War I; and one of three days in 1960 
to consider the purchase ot part of the former Old Colony Railroad 
right-of-way, the establishment of a state medical school, the continuity 
of terms of chairmen of the conmiissions on transportation and public 
utilities, the establishment of the salaries of the clerks of the Newton 
District Court and the Second Plymouth District Court and the appro- 
priation of money for the urban renewal division. 



328 



Length of Legislative Sessions, Etc. 











Days of 


Year 


Convened 


Prorogued 


Total 
Days 


Sitting 








Senate 


House 


1923 


January 3 


May 26 


144 


99 


99 


1924 






2 


June 5 


156 


108 


110 


1925 






7 


May 2 


116 


79 


81 


1926 






6 


29 


144 


86 


102 


1927 






5 


April 28 


114 


69 


78 


1928 






4 


July 25 


204 


105 


124 


1929 






2 


June 8 


158 


92 


109 


1930* 






1 


May 29 


149 


89 


107 


1931* 






7 


June 10 


155 


100 


107 


1932 






6 


7 


154 


92 


106 


1933* 






4 


July 22 


200 


123 


139 


1934 






3 


June 30 


179 


114 


122 


1935 






2 


Aug. 15 


226 


124 


126 


1936 






1 


July 2 


184 


106 


103 


1937 






6 


May 29 


144 


75 


84 


1938* 






5 


Aug. 24 


232 


115 


135 


1939t 






4 


12 


221 


1 107 


145 


1941* 






1 


Nov. 1 


305 


166 


170 


1943* 






6 


June 12 


158 


89 


90 


1945J 






3 


July 25 


204 


119 


119 


1946 






2 


June 15 


165 


98 


98 


1947 






1 


July 1 


182 


111 


109 


1948 






7 


June 19 


165 


97 


96 


1949 






5 


Aug. 31 


239 


140 


152 


1950 






4 


19 


228 


135 


136 


1951 






3 


Nov. 17 


319 


179 


189 


1952* 






2 


July 5 


186 


89 


103 


1953 






7 


4 


179 


92 


102 


1954* 






6 


June 11 


157 


91 


99 


1955 






5 


Sept. 16 


255 


141 


158 


1956 






4 


Oct. 6 


277 


145 


151 


1957 






2 


Sept. 21 


262 


142 


137 


1958 






1 


Oct. 17 


290 


162 


159 


1959 






7 


Sept. 17 


254 


143 


145 


1960* 






6 


Nov. 24 


324 


173 


172 


1961 






4 


May 26 


144 


82 


94 


1962 






3 


July 26 


205 


138 


127 


1963 






2 











♦ See note on extra sessions on pages 325-327. 
t First year of biennial session. 
JFirst year of return to annual sessions. 



Post Offices in Massachusetts. 



329 



POST OFFICES m MASSACHUSETTS, 



WITH THE CITIES OR TOWNS AND COUNTIES IN WHICH 
THEY ARE SITUATED. 



[Corrected to July, 1962.] 



[The spelling of the names of post offices is that established 
by the Post Office Department.] 



[Post offices marked * are open only during the summer months.] 
[Post offices marked t are in the Boston Postal Area.] 



POST OFFICES. 

Abington, 

Accord. 

Acoaxet,* 

Acton, . 

Acushnet, 

Adams, 

Agawam, 

Allendale, 

AUerton, 

AUston 34,t 

Amesbury, 

Amherst, 

Andover, 

Annisquam,* 

Arlington 74,t 

ArHngton Heights 75, t 

Army Base, 

Ashburnham, 

Ashby, . 

Ashfield, 

Ashland, 

Ashley Falls, 

Assinippi, 

Assonet, 

Astor 23,t 

Athol, . 

Attleboro, 

Attleboro Falls. 



CITIES AND TOWNS. 

Abington, 

Norwell. . 

Westport, 

Acton, 

Acushnet, 

Adams, 

Agawam, , 

Pittsfield, . 

Hull, 

Boston, 

Amesbury, 

Amherst, . 

Andover. . 

Gloucester, 

Arlington, 

Arlington, 

Boston, 

Ashburnham, 

Ashby, 

Ashfield, . 

Ashland, . 

Sheffield, . 

Hanover, . 

Freetown, 

Boston, 

Athol, 

Attleboro, 

North Attleborough, 



COUNTIES. 

Plymouth, 

Plymouth. 

Bristol. 

Middlesex. 

Bristol. 

Berkshire. 

Hampden. 

Berkshire. 

Plymouth. 

Suffolk. 

Essex. 

Hampshire. 

Essex. 

Essex. 

Middlesex. 

Middlesex. 

Suffolk. 

Worcester. 

Middlesex. 

Franklin. 

Middlesex. 

Berkshire. 

Plymouth. 

Bristol. 

Suffolk. 

Worcester. 

Bristol. 

Bristol. 



330 



Post Offices in Massachusetts. 



POST OFFICES. 


CITIES AND TOWNS. 


COUNTIES. 


Auburn, 


. Auburn, . . . Worcester. 


Auburndale 66,t 


. Newton, . 




Middlesex. 


Avon, . 


. Avon, 




Norfolk. 


Ayer, . 


. Ayer, 




Middlesex. 


Babson Park 57,t . 


. \^'ellesley, 




Norfolk. 


Back Bay Annex 15, 16, 1 


7,t . Boston, . 




Suffolk. 


Baldwinville, 


. Templeton 






Worcester. 


Ballard Vale, 


. Andover, 






Essex. 


Barnstable 


. Barnstable 






Barnstable. 


Barre, . 


. Barre, 






Worcester. 


Barre Plains, 


. Barre, 






Worcester. 


Barrowsville, 


, Norton, 






Bristol. 


Bass River, . 


. Yarmouth, 






Barnstable. 


Beach 51,t . 


. Revere, 






Suffolk. 


Becket, 


. Becket, 






Berkshire. 


Bedford, 


. Bedford, 






Middlesex. 


Belchertown, 


Belchertown, 




Hampshire 


Bellingham, . 


Bellingham, 




Norfolk. 


Belmont 78,t . 


Belmont, . 




Middlesex. 


Berkshire, 


. Lanesborough, 




Berkshire. 


BerHn, . 


. Berlin, 




Worcester. 


Bernardston, 


Bernardston, 




Franklin. 


Beverly, 


. Beverly, . 




Essex. 


Beverly Farms, 


Beverly, . 




Essex. 


Billerica, 


. Billerica, . 




Middlesex. 


Blackstone, . 


. Blackstone, 




Worcester. 


Blandford, 


. Blandford, 




Hampden. 


Bolton. 


. Bolton, 




Worcester. 


Bondsville, 


, Palmer, . 




Hampden. 


Boston,! 


Boston, 




Suffolk. 


Boston College, 


. Newton, . 




Suffolk. 


Bourne, 


. Bourne, . 




Barnstable 


Bowdoin Square 14,t 


Boston, 




Suffolk. 


Boxford, 


. Boxford, . 




Essex. 


Boylston, 


Boylston, . 




Worcester. 


Bradford, 


. Haverhill, 




Essex. 


Braintree 84,t 


Braintree, 




Norfolk. 


Brant Rock, . 


. Marshfleld. 




Plymouth. 


Brewster, 


Brewster, . 




Barnstable 


Bridgewater, . 


. Bridgewater, 




. Plymouth. 


Brighton 35,t 


. Boston, . 




Suffolk. 


Brightwood, . 


. Springfield 


, 




. Hampden. 



Post Offices in Massachusetts. 



331 



POST OFFICES. 


CITIES AND TOWNS. COUNTIES. 


Brimfield, 


Brimfield, 


Hampden. 


Brockton. 


Brockton, 


. Plymouth. 


Brookfield, 


. Brookfield, 


. Worcester. 


Brookline 46,t 


Brookline, 


. Norfolk. 


Brookline Village 47,t 


. Brookline. 


. Norfolk. 


Brookville, 


. Holbrook, 


. Norfolk. 


Bryantville, . 


. Pembroke, 


. Plymouth. 


Buckland, 


. Buckland. 


. Franklin. 


Burlington, . 


. Woburn, . 


. Middlesex. 


Buzzards Bay, 


Bourne, 


Barnstable 


Byfield, 


. Newbury, 


. Essex. 


Cambridge 38,t 


. Cambridge, 


. Middlesex. 


Cambridge A39 (Campt.) 


,t . Cambridge. 


. Middlesex. 


Cambridge B40 (N. Cam 


),t . Cambridge, 


. Middlesex. 


Cambridge C41 (E. Cam 


),t . Cambridge, 


. Middlesex. 


Campello. 


Brockton, 


. Plymouth. 


Canton, 


. Canton, . 


. Norfolk. 


Carlisle, 


, Carlisle, . 


. Middlesex. 


Carver, 


. Carver, 


, Plymouth. 


Caryville, 


. Bellingham, 


. Norfolk. 


Cataumet, 


Bourne, 


Barnstable. 


Center Street, 


Brockton, 


. Plymouth. 


Centerville, . 


. Barnstable, 


. Barnstable. 


Central Village, 


, Westport, 


. Bristol. 


Charlemont, . 


. Charlemont, 


. Franklin. 


Charles Street 14,t 


Boston, 


. Suffolk. 


Charlestown 29.t . 


Boston, 


. Suffolk. 


Charlton, 


. Charlton, . 


. Worcester. 


Charlton City, 


. Charlton. . 


. Worcester. 


Charlton Depot, 


. Charlton, . 


. Worcester. 


C hartley, 


. Norton, 


. Bristol. 


Chatham, 


, Chatham, 


Barnstable. 


Chelmsford, . 


. Chelmsford, 


. Middlesex. 


Chelsea 50,t - 


. Chelsea, . 


, Suffolk. 


Cherry Valley, 


. Leicester, . 


, Worcester. 


Cheshire, 


. Cheshire, . 


. Berkshire. 


Chester, 


. Chester, . 


. Hampden. 


Chesterfield. . 


. Chesterfield, 


. Hampshire. 


Chestnut Hill 67.t . 


. Newton, . 


. Middlesex. 


Chicopee, 


. Chicopee, . 


. Hampden. 


Chicopee Falls, 


. Chicopee. . 


. Hampden. 


Chilmark, 


. Chilmark, 


. Dukes. 



332 



Post Offices in Massachusetts. 



POST OFFICES. 

City Hall, 

Cleghorn, 

Cleveland Circle, 

Clifton, 

Clinton, 

Cochesett, 

Cochituate, . 

Cohasset, 

Colrain, 

Concord, 

Conway, 

Cordaville, 

Cotuit, . 

Craigville,* . 

Cummaquid, 

Cummington, 

Cushman, 

Cuttyhunk, . 



Dalton, 

Danvers, 

Dartmouth, 

Dedham, 

Deerfield, 

Dennis, 

Dennis Port 

Dighton, 

Division Street Stat 

Dodgeville, 

Dorchester 2 2,t 

Dorchester Center 

Dover, . 

Dracut, 

Drury, . 

Dudley, 

Dunstable , 

Duxbury, 



East Arlington 74,t 
East Boston 28,t . 
East Brewster, 



24.t 



CITIES AND TOWNS. 


COUNTIES 


Lawrence, 


Essex. 


Fitchburg, 


Worcester. 


Brookline, 


Suffolk. 


Marblehead, 


Essex. 


Clinton, . 


Worcester. 


West Bridgewater, 


Plymouth. 


Wayland, 


Middlesex. 


Cohasset, . 


Norfolk. 


Colrain, . 


Franklin. 


Concord, . 


Middlesex. 


Conway, . 


Franklin. 


Southborough . 


Worcester. 


Barnstable, 


Barnstable. 


Barnstable, 


Barnstable. 


Barnstable, 


Barnstable. 


Cummington, . 


Hampshire. 


Amherst, . 


Hampshire. 


Gosnoid, . 


Dukes. 


Dalton, . 


Berkshire. 


Danvers, . 


Essex 


Dartmouth, 


Bristol. 


Dedham, . 


Norfolk. 


Deerfield, 


Franklin. 


Dennis, 


Barnstable. 


Dennis, 


Barnstable. 


Dighton, . 


Bristol. 


New Bedford, . 


Bristol. 


Attleboro, 


Bristol. 


Boston, 


Suffolk. 


Boston, 


Suffolk. 


Dover, 


. Norfolk. 


Dracut, . 


Middlesex. 


Florida, . 


Berkshire. 


Dudley, . 


. Worcester. 


Dunstable, 


. Middlesex. 


Duxbury, . 


. Plymouth. 


Arlington, 


. Middlesex. 


Boston, 


. Suffolk. 


Brewster, . 


Barnstable 



Post Offices in Massachusetts. 



333 



POST OFFICES. 


CITIES AND TOWNS. COUNTIES. 


East Bridgewater, . 


. East Bridgewater, . Plymouth. 


East Brookfield, 


, East Brookfield, 


. Worcester. 


East Dedham, 


. Dedham. . 


. Norfolk. 


East Dennis, 


. Dennis, 


. Barnstable. 


East Douglas, 


Douglas, . 


. Worcester. 


East Falmouth, 


. Falmouth, 


Barnstable. 


East Freetown, 


. Freetown, 


. Bristol. 


East ham. 


. Eastham, 


. Barnstable, 


Easthampton, 


. Easthampton, . 


. Hampshire. 


East Harwich, 


. Harwich. . 


. Barnstable. 


East Longmeadow, 


. East Longmeadow, . Hampden. 


East Lynn, 


. Lynn, 


. Essex. 


East Mansfield, 


. Mansfield, 


. Bristol. 


East Northfield, . 


. Northfield, 


. Franklin. 


Easton, 


. Easton, 


. Bristol. 


Eastondale, . 


. Easton, 


. Bristol. 


East Orleans, 


. Orleans, . 


. Barnstable. 


East Otis, 


. Otis, 


. Berkshire. 


East Pembroke, 


. Pembroke, 


. Plymouth. 


East Pepperell, 


. Pepperell, 


. Middlesex. 


East Princeton, 


. Princeton, 


. Worcester. 


East Sandwich, 


. Sandwich. 


. Barnstable. 


East Taunton, 


. Taunton, . 


. Bristol. 


East Templeton, . 


. Templeton. 


. Worcester. 


East Walpole, 


. Walpole, . 


. Norfolk. 


East Wareham, 


. Wareham, 


Plymouth. 


East Water town 72,t 


. Watertown. 


. Middlesex. 


East Weymouth 89, t 


. Weymouth. 


. Norfolk. 


Edgartown, . 


. Edgartown, 


. Dukes. 


Egypt, . 


. Scituate, . 


. Plymouth. 


Elm wood. 


. East Bridgewate 


r, . Plymouth. 


Erving, 


. Erving, 


. Franklin. 


Essex, . 


. Essex. 


. Essex. 


Essex 12,t 


. Boston, 


. Suffolk. 


Everett 49,t . 


. Everett, . 


. Middlesex. 


Fairhaven, 


. Fairhaven. 


. Bristol. 


Fairview, 


. Chicopee, 


. Hampderj. 


Fall River. 


. Fall River. 


. Bristol. 


Falmouth, 


. Falmouth, 


. Barnstable 


Falmouth Heights,* 


. Falmouth, 


. Barnstable 


Farnams. 


. Cheshire, . 


Berkshire. 



334 



Post Offices in Massachusetts. 



POST OFFICES. 

Fayville, 

Federal Reserve,! 

Feeding Hills, 

Fiskdale, 

Fitchburg, 

Flint. . 

Florence, 

Forestdale, 

Forest Park, 

Forge Village 

Fort Devens, 

Foxboro, 

Framingham, 

Framingham Center 

Franklin, 



Gardner, 

Georgetown, . 

Gilbertville, . 

Gleasondale, . 

Glendale, 

Gloucester, 

Goshen, 

Grafton, 

Granby, 

Graniteville, . 

Granville, 

Great Barrington, 

Greenbush, 

Greendale, 

Greenfield, 

Green Harbor, 

Greenwood, . 

Griswoldville, 

Groton, 

Grove Hall 21,t 

Groveland, 



Hadley, 
Halifax, 
Hamilton, 



CITIES AND TOWNS. 


COUNTIES 


Southborough, . 


. Worcester. 


Boston, 


. Suffolk. 


Agawam, . 


. Hampden. 


Sturbridge. 


. \\'orcester. 


Fitchburg, 


. Worcester. 


Fall River, 


. Bristol. 


Northampton, . 


. Hampshire. 


Sandwich, 


Barnstable, 


Springfield, 


. Hampden. 


Westford, 


. Middlesex. 


Ayer, 


. Middlesex. 


Foxborough, 


. Norfolk. 


Framingham, 


. Middlesex. 


Framingham, 


. Middlesex. 


Franklin, . 


. Norfolk. 


Gardner, . 


. Worcester. 


Georgetown, 


Essex. 


Hardwick, 


Worcester. 


Stow, 


. Middlesex. 


Stockbridge, 


Berkshire. 


Gloucester, 


Essex. 


Goshen, . 


Hampshire. 


Grafton, . 


Worcester. 


Granby, . 


Hampshire. 


Westford, 


Middlesex. 


Granville, 


Hampden, 


Great Barrington, 


Berkshire. 


Scituate, . 


Plymouth.. 


Worcester, 


Worcester. 


Greenfield, 


Franklin. 


Marshfield, 


Plymouth. 


Wakefield. 


Middlesex. 


Colrain, . 


Franklin. 


Groton. 


Middlesex. 


Boston, 


Suffolk. 


Groveland, 


Essex. 


Hadley. . 


Hampshire. 


Halifax, . 


Plymouth. 


Hamilton, 


Essex. 



Post Offices in Massachusetts. 



335 



POST OFFICES. 

Hampden, 

Hancock, 

Hanover, 

Hanover Center, 

Hanover Street 13,t 

Hanson, 

Harding, 

Hardwick, 

Harvard, 

Harwich, 

Harwich Port, 

Haichville, 

Hatfield, 

Hathorne, 

Haverhill, 

Haydenville, 

Heath, . 

Hebronville, 

Highland, 

Highlands, 

Hingham, 

Hinsdale, 

Holbrook, 

Holden, 

HoUiston, 

Holyoke, 

Hoosac Tunnel 

Hopedale, 

Hopkinton, 

Housatonic, 

Hubbardston 

Hudson, 

Hull, . 

Humarock, 

Huntington, 

Hyannis, 

Hyannis Port, 

Hyde Park 36.t 



CITIES AND TOWNS. 

Hampden, 

Hancock, . 

Hanover, . 

Hanover, . 

Boston, 

Hanson, . 

Medfield. 

Hardwick, 

Harvard, . 

Harwich, , 

Harwich, . 

Falmouth, 

Hatfield. . 

Danvers, . 

Haverhill, 

Williamsburg 

Heath, . 

Attleboro, 

Springfield, 

Lowell, 

Hingham, 

Hinsdale, 

Holbrook, 

Holden, . 

Holliston, 

Holyoke, . 

Florida, . 

Hopedale, 

Hopkinton, 

Great Barringto: 

Hubbardston, 

Hudson, . 

Hull. 

Scituate, . 

Huntington, 

Barnstable, 

Barnstable, 

Boston, 



COUNTIES. 

Hampden. 

Berkshire. 

Plymouth. 

Plymouth. 

Suffolk. 

Plymouth. 

Norfolk. 

Worcester. 

Worcester. 

Barnstable. 

Barnstable. 

Barnstable. 

Hampshire. 

Essex. 

Essex. 

Hampshire. 

Franklin. 

Bristol. 

Hampden. 

Middlesex. 

Plymouth. 

Berkshire. 

Norfolk. 

Worcester. 

Middlesex. 

Hampden. 

Berkshire. 

Worcester. 

Middlesex. 

Berkshire. 

Worcester. 

Middlesex. 

Plymouth. 

Plymouth. 

Hampshire. 

Barnstable. 

Barnstable. 

Suffolk. 



Indian Orchard, 
Inman Square 39, t . 
Ipswich, 



Springfield, 
Cambridge, 
Ipswich, . 



Hampden. 
Middlesex. 
Essex. 



336 



Post Offices in Massachusetts. 



POST OFFICES. 


CITIES AND TOWNS. COUNTIES 


Island Creek, 


. Duxbury, 


. Plymouth. 


Islington, 


. West wood. 


. Norfolk. 


Jamaica Plain 30,t . 


Boston, 


. Suffolk. 


Jefferson, 


. Holden, . 


. Worcester. 


Kendall Square 42 ,t 


. Cambridge, 


. Middlesex. 


Kenmore 15,t 


Boston, 


. Suffolk. 


Kingston, 


. Kingston, 


. Plymouth. 


Lake Pleasant, 


. Montague, 


. Franklin. 


Lakeville, 


Middleborough, 


. Plymouth. 


Lancaster, 


. Lancaster, 


. Worcester. 


Lanesboro, 


. Lanesborough, 


. Berkshire. 


Lanesville, 


. Gloucester, 


. Essex. 


Lawrence, 


. Lawrence, 


. Essex. 


Lee, 


. Lee. 


. Berkshire. 


Leeds, . 


. Northampton, 


. Hampshire. 


Leicester, 


. Leicester, 


. Worcester. 


Lenox, . 


. Lenox, 


Berkshire. 


Lenox Dale, . 


. Lenox, 


Berkshire. 


Leominster, . 


. Leominster, 


. Worcester. 


Leverett, 


. Leverett, . 


. Franklin. 


Lexington 73, t 


. Lexington, 


. Middlesex. 


Lincoln, 


. Lincoln, . 


. Middlesex. 


Linwood, 


. Uxbridge, 


. Worcester. 


Lithia, . 


. Goshen, . 


. Hampshire. 


Littleton, 


. Littleton, 


Middlesex. 


Littleton Common, 


. Littleton, 


. Middlesex. 


Long Island,! 


Boston, 


. Suffolk. 


Longmeadow, 


. Longmeadow, 


. Hampden. 


Lowell, 


. Lowell, . 


. Middlesex. 


Ludlow, 


. Ludlow, . 


. Hampden. 


Lunenburg, 


. Lunenburg, 


. Worcester. 


Lynn, . 


. Lynn, 


. Essex. 


Lynnfield, 


. Lynnfield, 


. Essex. 


Lyonsville, 


. Colrain, . 


. Franklin. 


Magnolia, 


. Gloucester, 


. Essex. 


Maiden 48.t . 


. Maiden, . 


. Middlesex. 


Manchaug, 


. Sutton, 


. V^'orcester. 


Manchester, . 


. Manchester, 


. Essex. 



Post Offices in Massachusetts. 



337 



POST OFFICES. 

Manomet, 

Mansfield, 

Marblehead, . 

Marion, 

Marlboro, 

Marshfield, 

Marshfield HiUs, 

Marstons Mills, 

Mashpee, 

Mattapan 26,t 

Mattapoisett, 

Maynard, 

Medfield, 

Medford 55,t 

Medford Hillside 55 

Medway, 

Melrose 76,t . 

Melrose Highlands 

Mendon, 

Menemsha,* . 

Merrimac, 

Merrimack College, 

Methuen, 

Middleboro, . 

Middlefield. . 

Middleton, 

Milford, 

Millbrook, 

Millbury, 

Millers Falls, 

Millis, . 

Mill River, . 

Millville, 

Milton 86,t . 

Milton Lower Mills 

Minot, . 

Mittineague, . 

Monponsett, . 

Monroe Bridge, 

Monson, 

Montague, 

Montague City, 

Montello, 



77,t 



87,t 



CITIES AND TOW'NS. 
Plymouth, 
Mansfield, 
Marblehead, 
Marion, 
Marlborough, 
Marshfield, 
Marshfield, 
Barnstable, 
Mashpee, . 
Boston, 
Mattapoisett, 
Maynard, 
Medfield, . 
Medford, , 
Medford, . 
Medway, . 
Melrose, . 
Melrose, . 
Mendon, . 
Chilmark, 
Merrimac, 
North Andover, 
Methuen, 
Middleborough, 
Middlefield, 
Middleton, 
Milford, . 
Duxbury, 
Millbury, 
Montague, 
Millis, 
New Marlborough, 
Millville, . 
Milton, 
Milton, 
Scituate, . 
West Springfield, 
Hanson, . 
Monroe, . 
Monson, . 
Montague, 
Montague, 
Brockton, 



COUNTIES. 

Plymouth. 

Bristol. 

Essex. 

Plymouth. 

Middlesex. 

Plymouth. 

Plymouth. 

Barnstable. 

Barnstable. 

Suffolk. 

Plymouth. 

Middlesex. 

Norfolk. 

Middlesex. 

Middlesex. 

Norfolk. 

Middlesex. 

Middlesex. 

Worcester. 

Dukes. 

Essex. 

Essex. 

Essex. 

Plymouth. 

Hampshire. 

Essex. 

Worcester. 

Plymouth. 

Worcester. 

Franklin. 

Norfolk. 

Berkshire. 

Worcester. 

Norfolk. 

Norfolk. 

Plymouth. 

Hampden. 

Plymouth. 

Franklin. 

Hampden. 

Franklin. 

Franklin. 

Plymouth. 



338 



Post Offices in Massachusetts. 



POST OFFICES. 

Monterey, 
Monument Beach 
M cores Corner, 
Morningdale, 
Mount Hermon, 
Mount Saint James, 
Mount Tom, . 

Nabnasset, 

Nahant, 

Nantucket, 

Natick, 

Needham 92 ,t 

Needham Heights 94,t 

New Bedford, 

New Braintree, 

Newbury, 

Newburyport, 

New Marlboro, 

New Salem, . 

Newton 58,t . 

Newton Center S9,t 

Newton Highlands 61, t 

Newton Lower Falls 62 ,t 

Newton Upper Falls 64,t 

Newtonville 60,t 

Nonantum, 

Nonquitt,* 

Norfolk. 

Norfolk Downs, 

North, . 

North Abington, 

North Adams, 

North Amherst, 

Northampton, 

North Andover, 

North Attleboro, 

North BelHngham, 

North Billerica, 

Northboro, 

Northbridge, . 

North Brookfield, 

North Carver, 



CITIES AND TOWNS. 

Monterey, 

Bourne, 

Leverett, . 

Boylston, 

Gill, 

Worcester, 

Easthampton, 

Westford, 
Nahant, . 
Nantucket, 
Natick, 
Needham, 
Needham, 
New Bedford, 
New Braintree, 
Newbury, 
Newburyport, 
New Marlborough, 
New Salem, 
Newton, . 
Newton, . 
Newton, . 
Newton, . 
Newton, , 
Newton, . 
Newton, . 
Dartmouth, 
Norfolk, . 
Quincy, 
New Bedford, 
Abington, 
North Adams, 
Amherst, . 
Northampton, 
North Andover, 
North Attleborough, 
Bellingham, 
Billerica, . 
Northborough, 
Northbridge, 
North Brookfield, 
Carver, 



COUNTIES. 

Berkshire. 

Barnstable. 

Franklin. 

Worcester. 

Franklin. 

Worcester. 

Hampshire. 

Middlesex. 

Essex. 

Nantucket, 

Middlesex. 

Norfolk. 

Norfolk. 

Bristol. 

Worcester. 

Essex. 

Essex. 

Berkshire. 

Franklin. * 

Middlesex. 

Middlesex. 

Middlesex. 

Middlesex. 

Middlesex. 

Middlesex. 

Middlesex. 

Bristol. 

Norfolk. 

Norfolk. 

Bristol. 

Plymouth. 

Berkshire. 

Hampshire. 

Hampshire. 

Essex. 

Bristol. 

Norfolk. 

Middlesex. 

Worcester. 

Worcester. 

Worcester. 

Plymouth. 



Post Offices in Massachusetts. 



339 



POST OFFICES. 

North Chatham, 
North Chelmsford 
North Cohasset, 
North Dartmouth, 
North Dighton, 
North Eastham, 
North Easton, 
North Egremont, 
North Falmouth, 
Northfield, 
North Grafton. 
North Hadley, 
North Hanover, 
North Hatfield. 
North Marshfield, 
North Orange, 
North Oxford, 
North Pembroke, 
North Plymouth, 
North Postal Annex 
North Quincy 71,t 
North Randolph, 
North Reading, 
North Scituate. 
North Truro, 
North Uxbridge, 
North Westport, 
North Weymouth 91,t 
North Wilbraham, 
North Wilmington, 
Norton, 
Norwell, 
Norwood, 
Nutting Lake 

Oak Bluffs, 
Oakdale, 
Oakham, 
Ocean Bluff, 
Ocean Grove, 
Onset, . 
Orange, 
Orleans, 



14,t 



CITIES AND TOWNS. 
Chatham, 
Chelmsford, 
Cohasset, 
Dartmouth, 
Dighton. . 
Eastham, . 
Easton , 
Egremont, 
Falmouth, 
Northfield, 
Grafton, . 
Hadley, . 
Hanover, . 
Hatfield, . 
Marshfield, 
Orange, 
Oxford, . 
Pembroke, 
Plymouth, 
Boston, 
Quincy, . 
Randolph, 
North Reading 
Scituate, . 
Truro, 
Uxbridge, 
Westport, 
Weymouth, 
Wilbraham, 
Wilmington, 
Norton, 
Norwell, . 
Norwood, 
Billerica, . 

,Oak Bluffs. 
West Boylston, 
Oakham, . 
Marshfield, 
Swansea, . 
Wareham, 
Orange, 
Orleans. . 



COUNTIES. 

Barnstable. 

Middlesex. 

Norfolk. 

Bristol. 

Bristol. 

Barnstable. 

Bristol. 

Berkshire. 

Barnstable. 

Franklin. 
Worcester. 

Hampshire. 

Plymouth. 

Hampshire. 

Plymouth. 

Franklin. 

Worcester. 

Plymouth. 

Plymouth. 

Suffolk. 

Norfolk. 

Norfolk. 

Middlesex. 

Plymouth. 

Barnstable. 

Worcester. 

Bristol. 

Norfolk. 

Hampden. 

Middlesex. 

Bristol. 

Plymouth. 

Norfolk. 

Middlesex. 

Dukes. 

Worcester, 

Worcester, 

Plymouth. 

Bristol. 

Plymouth. 

Franklin. 

Barnstable. 



340 



Post Offices in Massachusetts. 



POST OFFICES. 


CITIES AND TOWNS. COUNTIES. 


Osterville, 


Barnstable, 


. Barnstable. 


Otis 


. Otis, 


. Berkshire. 


Otis Air Force Base, 


. Falmouth, 


Barnstable. 


Oxford. 


. Oxford, , 


. Worcester. 


Palmer, 


. Palmer, . 


. Hampden. 


Parkwood Beach,* . 


. Wareham, 


. Plymouth. 


Paxton, 


, Paxton, . 


. Worcester. 


Peabody, 


. Peabody, . 


. Essex. 


Pembroke, 


. Pembroke, 


. Plymouth. 


Pepperell, 


. Pepperell, 


. Middlesex. 


Petersham, 


. Petersham, 


. Worcester. 


Pigeon Cove, 


. Rockport, 


. Essex. 


Pinehurst, 


. Billerica, . 


. Middlesex. 


Pittsfield, 


. Pittsfield, 


Berkshire. 


Plainfield, 


. Plainfield, 


. Hampshire 


Plainville, 


. Plainville, 


. Norfolk. 


Pleasant Lake, 


. Harwich, . 


. Barnstable. 


Plum Island,* 


. Newburyport, 


. Essex. 


Plymouth, 


. Plymouth, 


. Plymouth. 


Plympton, 


. Plympton, 


. Plymouth. 


Pocasset, 


. Bourne, 


. Barnstable. 


Popponesset Beach,* 


. Barnstable, 


. Barnstable 


Prides Crossing, 


. Beverly, . 


. Essex. 


Princeton, 


. Princeton, 


. Worcester. 


Provincetown, 


. Provincetown, 


Barnstable 


Quincy 69,t . 


. Quincy, . 


, Norfolk. 


Quinsigamond, 


. Worcester, 


. Worcester. 


Randolph, 


. Randolph, 


. Norfolk. 


Raynham. 


. Raynham, 


. Bristol. 


Raynham Center, . 


. Raynham, 


. Bristol. 


Reading, 


. Reading, . 


. Middlesex. 


Readville 37.t 


. Boston, . 


. Suffolk. 


Rehoboth, 


, Rehoboth, 


. Bristol. 


Revere 5 l.t . 


RtH^ere, 


. Suffolk. 


Richmond, 


. Richmond, 


. Berkshire. 


Riverdale, 


. Gloucester, 


. Essex. 


Rochdale, 


. Leicester. . 


. Worcester. 


Rochester, 


. Rochester, 


. Plymouth. 


Rockland, 


. Rockland, 


. Plymouth. 


Rockport, 


. Rockport, 


. Essex. 


Roslindale 31,t 


Boston, 


. Suffolk. 



Post Offices in Massachusetts. 



341 



POST OFFICES. 


CITIES AND TOWNS. COUNTIES. 


Rowe, . 


. Rowe, 


. Franklin. 


Rowley, 


. Rowley, . 


. Essex. 


Roxbury 19,t 


. Boston, . 


. Suffolk. 


Roxbury Crossing 20,t 


Boston, 


. Suffolk. 


Royalston, 


Royalston, 


. Worcester. 


Russell. 


. Russell, . 


. Hampden. 


Rutland, 


. Rutland, . 


. Worcester. 


Rutland Heights, . 


. Rutland, . 


. Worcester. 


Sagamore, 


. Bourne, . 


. Barnstable 


Sagamore Beach, . 


. Bourne, . 


. Barnstable. 


Salem, . 


. Salem, . 


. Essex. 


Salisbury, 


. Salisbury, 


. Essex. 


Salisbury Beach, . 


. Salisbury, 


. Essex. 


Sandisfield, . 


. Sandisfield, 


Berkshire. 


Sandwich, 


. Sandwich, 


Barnstable. 


Santuit, 


. Barnstable, 


. Barnstable. 


Saugus, 


. Saugus, . 


. Essex. 


Savoy, . 


. Savoy, 


. Berkshire. 


Saxonville, 


. Framingham, 


Middlesex. 


Scituate, 


. Scituate, . 


. Plymouth. 


Seekonk, 


. Seekonk, . 


. Bristol. 


Segreganset, . 


. Dighton, . 


. Bristol. 


Sharon, 


. Sharon, 


. Norfolk. 


Shattuckville, 


. Colrain, . 


. Franklin. 


Shawsheen Village, 


. Andover, . 


. Essex. 


Sheffield, 


. Sheffield. . 


. Berkshire. 


Shelburne FaUs, 


. Shelburne, 


. Franklin. 


Sheldonville, . 


. Wrentham, 


. Norfolk. 


Sherborn, 


. Sherborn, . 


. Middlesex. 


Shirley, 


. Shirley, . 


. Middlesex. 


Shirley Center, 


. Shirley, . 


. Middlesex. 


Shrewsbury', . 


. Shrewsbury, 


. Worcester. 


Shutesbury, . 


. Shutesbury, 


. Franklin. 


Siasconset, 


. Nantucket, 


. Nantucket 


Silver Beach, 


. Falmouth, 


Barnstable 


Soldiers Field 63,t . 


Boston, 


. Suffolk. 


Somerset, 


. Somerset, 


. Bristol. 


Somerville 43, t 


. Somerville. 


. Middlesex. 


South, . 


. Fall River, 


. Bristol. 


South Acton, 


. Acton, 


. Middlesex. 


Southampton, 


. Southampton, 


. Hampshire 


South Ashburnham, 


. Ashburnham, 


. \\'orcester. 



342 



Post Offices in Massachusetts. 



POST OFFICES. 

South Ashfield, 
South Athol, . 
South Attleboro, 
South Barre, . 
South Berlin, 
Southboro, 
South Boston 27,t 
Southbridge, . 
South Byfiield. 
South Carver, 
South Chatham, 
South Chelmsford, 
South Dartmouth, 
South Deerfield, 
South Dennis, 
South Duxbury, 
South Easton, 
South Egremont, 
South Essex, . 
Southfield, 
South Gardner, 
South Grafton, 
South Hadley, 
South Hadley Falls 
South Hamilton, 
South Hanover, 
South Harwich, 
South Lancaster, 
South Lee, 
South Lincoln, 
South Lynnfield, 
South Natick, 
South Orleans, 
South Postal Annex 
South Royalston, 
South Swansea, 
South Vernon, 
Southville, 
South Walpole. 
South Waltham 54, 
South Wellfleet, 
South Westport, 
South Weymouth 90,t 



9.t 



CITIES AND TOWNS. 

Ashfield, . 

Athol, 

Attleboro, 

Barre, 

Berlin, 

Southborough, 

Boston, 

Southbridge, 

Newbury, 

Carver, 

Chatham, 

Chelmsford, 

Dartmouth, 

Deerfield, 

Dennis, 

Duxbury. 

Easton, 

Egremont, 



New Marlborough, 

Gardner, . 

Grafton, 

South Hadley, 

South Hadley, 

Hamilton, 

Hanover, . 

Harwich, . 

Lancaster, 

Lee, 

Lincoln, 

Lynnfield, 

Natick, 

Orleans, . 

Boston, 

Royalston, 

Swansea, . 

Northfield, 

Southborough, 

Walpole, . 

Waltham, 

Wellfleet. . 

Westport, 

Weymouth, 



COUNTIES. 

Franklin. 

Worcester. 

Bristol. 

Worcester. 

Worcester. 

\^'orcester. 

Suffolk. 

V.'orcester. 

Essex. 

Plymouth. 

Barnstable. 

Middlesex. 

Bristol. 

Franklin. 

Barnstable. 

Plymouth. 

Bristol. 

Berkshire. 

Essex. 

Berkshire. 

Worcester. 

Worcester. 

Hampshire. 

Hampshire. 

Essex. 

Plymouth. 

Barnstable. 

Worcester. 

Berkshire. 

Middlesex. 

Essex. 

Middlesex. 

Barnstable. 

Suffolk. 

Worcester. 

Bristol. 

Franklin. 

Worcester. 

Norfolk. 

Middlesex. 

Barnstable. 

Bristol. 

Norfolk. 



Post Offices in Massachusetts. 



343 



POST OFFICES. 


CITIES AND TOWNS. 


COUNTIES 


Soiithwick, 


. Southwick, 


Hampden. 


South Yarmouth. . 


. Yarmouth, 


Barnstable. 


Spencer, 


. Spencer, . 


Worcester. 


Springfield, 


. Springfield, 


Hampden. 


Squantum.t . 


. Quincy, . 


Norfolk. 


State House 33,t . 


. Boston, 


Suffolk. 


State Line, . 


. West Stockbridge. 


Berkshire. 


Sterling, 


. Sterling, . 


Worcester. 


Sterling Junction, . 


. Sterling, . 


Worcester. 


Still River, . 


. Harvard, . 


Worcester. 


Stockbridge. . 


. Stockbridge, 


Berkshire. 


Stoneham 80,t 


. Stoneham, 


IMiddlesex. 


Stoughton, . 


. Stoughton, 


Norfolk. 


Stow, . 


. Stow, 


Middlesex. 


Sturbridge, . 


. Sturbridge, 


Worcester. 


Sudbury, 


. Sudbury, . 


Middlesex. 


Sunderland, . 


. Sunderland, 


Franklin. 


Swampscott, . 


. Swampscott, 


Essex. 


Swansea, 


. Swansea. . 


Bristol. 


Swift River. . 


. Cummington. . 


Hampshire 


Swifts Beach.* 


. Wareham, 


Plymouth. 


Tapley Street Annex, 


. Springfield. 


Hampden. 


Taunton, 


. Taunton. . 


Bristol. 


Teaticket. 


. Falmouth. 


Barnstable. 


Templeton, . 


. Templeton, 


Worcester. 


Terminal lO.t 


Boston. 


Suffolk. 


Tewksbury, . 


. Tewksbury, 


Middlesex. 


Thorndike. . 


. Palmer. , 


Hampden. 


Three Rivers, 


. Palmer. . 


Hampden. 


Topsfield, 


. Topsfield. 


Essex. 


Townsend, 


. Townsend, 


Middlesex. 


Tremont 16,t 


Boston, 


. Suffolk. 


Truro. . 


. Truro. 


Barnstable. 


Tufts University 53.t 


. Medford . 


Middlesex. 


Turners Falls, 


. Montague, 


Franklin. 


Turnpike, 


. Shrewsbury, 


Worcester. 


Tyngsboro, 


. Tyngsborough, . 


Middlesex. 


Tyringham, . 


. Tyringham, 


Berkshire. 


Uphams Corner 25,t 


Boston. 


Suffolk. 


Upton, . 


. Upton. 


Worcester. 


Uxbridge. 


. Uxbridge, . 


Worcester. 



344 



Post Offices in Massachusetts, 



POST OFFICES. 


CITIES AND TOWNS. COUNTIES 


Veterans Administration Hospi- Boston, 


. Suffolk. 


tal.t 






Vineyard Haven, . 


. Tisbury, . 


. Dukes. 


Waban 68,t . 


. Newton, . 


. Middlesex. 


Wakefield, . 


. Wakefield. 


. Middlesex. 


Wales. . 


. Wales, 


. Hampden. 


Walpole, 


. Walpole. . 


, Norfolk. 


Waltham 54.t 


. Waltham, 


. Middlesex. 


Waquoit, 


. Falmouth, 


. Barnstable. 


Ward Hill, . 


. Haverhill, 


. Essex. 


Ware, . 


. Ware, 


. Hampshire 


Wareham, 


. Wareham, 


. Plymouth. 


Warren, 


. Warren, . 


. Worcester. 


Warwick, 


. Warwick, . 


. Franklin. 


Washington Square.t 


Brookline, 


. Norfolk. 


Watertown 72, t 


. Watertown, 


. Middlesex. 


Waterville, . 


. Winchendon, 


. Worcester. 


Waverley 79,t 


. Belmont, . 


. Middlesex. 


Wayland. 


. Wayland, . 


. Middlesex. 


Webster, 


. Webster, . 


. Worcester. 


Webster Square, 


. Worcester, 


. Worcester. 


Wellesley 81,t 


. Wellesley, 


. Norfolk. 


Wellesley Hills 82. t 


. Wellesley, 


. Norfolk. 


Wellfleet, 


. Wellfleet. . 


. Barnstable. 


Wendell. 


. Wendell, . 


. Franklin. 


Wendell Depot, 


. Wendell, . 


, Franklin. 


Wenham, 


, Wenham, . 


. Essex. 


West Acton, . 


. Acton. 


. Middlesex. 


West Barnstable, . 


Barnstable. 


. Barnstable. 


Westboro, 


. Westborough, 


, Worcester. 


West Boxford, 


Boxford. . 


, Essex. 


West Boylston, 


. West Boylston. 


. Worcester. 


West Bridgewater, 


. West BridgewaU 


IT, . Plymouth. 


West Brookfield, . 


. West Brookfield 


. Worcester. 


West Chatham, 


. Chatham. 


. Barnstable. 


West Chelmsford, . 


. Chelmsford. 


. Middlesex. 


West Chesterfield, . 


. Chesterfield, 


. Hampshire. 


West Chop.* . 


. Tisbury, . 


. Dukes. 


West Concord, 


. Concord, . 


. Middlesex. 


West Cummington, 


. Cummington, 


. Hampshire. 


West Dennis, 


. Dennis, 


, Barnstable. 


West Falmouth, 


. Falmouth, 


Barnstable. 



Post Offices in Massachusetts. 



345 



POST OFFICES. 

Westfield, 
Westford, 
West Groton, 
West Hanover, 
West Harwich, 
West Hatfield, 
West Hawley, 
West Hyannisport, 
West Lynn, . 
West Mansfield, 
West Medford 55, t 
West Medway, 
West Millbury, 
Westminster, 
West Newbury, 
West Newton 65 ,t 
Weston 93, t . 
Westover Air Force 
West Peabody, 
Westport, 
Westport Point, 
West Roxbury 32, t 
West Side, 
West Somerville 44 
West Springfield, 
West Stockbridge, 
West Tisbury, 
West Townsend, 
West Upton, . 
West Wareham, 
West Warren, 
Westwood, 
West Yarmouth, 
Weymouth 88,t 
Whately, 
Wheelwright, 
White Horse Beach 
Whitinsville, . 
Whitman, 
Wianno,* 
Wilbraham, . 
Wilkinsonville, 
Williamsburg, 



Base 



CITIES AND TOWNS. 

Westfield, 

Westford, 

Groton, 

Hanover, . 

Harwich, . 

Hatfield, . 

Hawley, . 

Barnstable, 

Lynn, 

Mansfield, 

Txledford, . 

Medway, . 

Millbury, . 

Westminster, 

West Newbury, 

Newton . 

Weston, . 

Chicopee. . 

Peabody, . 

Westport, 

Westport, 

Boston, 

Worcester, 

Somerville, 

West Springfield, 

West Stockbridge, 

West Tisbury. 

Townsend, 

Upton, 

Wareham, 

Warren, 

Westwood, 

Yarmouth, 

Weymouth, 

Whately, . 

Hardwick, 

Plymouth, 

Northbridge, 

Whitman, 

Barnstable, 

Wilbraham, 

Sutton, 

Williamsburg, 



COUNTIES. 

Hampden. 

Middlesex. 

Middlesex. 

Plymouth. 

Barnstable. 

Hampshire. 

Franklin. 

Barnstable 

Essex. 

Bristol. 

Middlesex. 

Norfolk. 

Worcester. 

Worcester. 

Essex. 

Middlesex. 

Middlesex. 

Hampden. 

Essex. 

Bristol. 

Bristol. 

Suffolk. 

Worcester. 

Middlesex. 

Hampden. 

Berkshire. 

Dukes. 

Middlesex. 

Worcester. 

Plymouth. 

Worcester. 

Norfolk. 

Barnstable. 

Norfolk. 

Franklin. 

Worcester. 

Plymouth. 

Worcester. 

Plymouth. 

Barnstable. 

Hampden. 

Worcester. 

Hampshire. 



346 



Post Offices in Massachusetts. 



POST OFFICES. 

Williamstown, 

Willimansett, 

Wilmington, . 

VVinchendon, 

Winchendon Springs 

Winchester, . 

Windsor, 

Winter Hill 45,t 

Winthrop 52.t 

Woburn, 

Wollaston 70,t 

Woods Hole, . 

Woodville, 

Worcester, 

Woronoco, 

Worthington, 

Wrentham, 



CITIES AND TOWNS. 

Williamstown, 

Chicopee, . 

Wilmington, 

Winchendon, 

Winchendon, 

Winchester, 

Windsor, . 

Somerville, 

Winthrop, 

Woburn, . 

Quincy, 

Falmouth, 

Hopkinton, 

\\'orcester, 

Russell, 

Worthington, 

Wrentham, 



COUNTIES. 

Berkshire. 

Hampden. 

Middlesex. 

Worcester. 

Worcester. 

Middlesex. 

Berkshire. 

Middlesex. 

Suffolk. 

Middlesex. 

Norfolk. 

Barnstable. 

Middlesex. 

Worcester. 

Hampden. 

Hampshire. 

Norfolk. 



Yarmouth Port, 



Yarmouth, 



Barnstable. 



County Officers 347 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 



By the provisions of the designated sections of chapter 5t of the Gen- 
eral Laws (see also chapter 221), county officers are chosen at biennial 
State elections by the voters of each of the several counties, or dis- 
tricts, as follows: — 

Section 155, a Clerk of the Supreme Judicial Court for the Count:; of 
Suffolk and two Clerks of the Sup''.rior Court of said county, one for 
civil and one for criminal business, and a Clerk of the Courts in each 
of the other counties who shall act as clerk of the Supreme Judicial 
Court, of the Superior Court and of the County Commissioners, — 
1922 and every sixth year thereafter. Section 156, a Register of 
Probate and Insolvency, — 1924 and every sixth year thereafter. 
Section 157, a Register of Deeds (district or county). — 1922 and 
every sixth year thereafter. Section 158 (as amended by chapter 31 
of the Acts of 1939), two County Commissioners (except in Suffolk 
and Nantucket counties, which see), — 1940 and every fourth year 
thereafter; and one County Commissioner, — 1942 and every fourth 
year thereafter. Section 159, a Sheriff, — 1926 and every sixth year 
thereafter. Section 160, a County Treasurer (e.xcept in Suffolk and 
Nantucket counties, which see), — 1924 and every sixth year 
thereafter. 

All of the foregoing officers hold office beginning with the first Wednes- 
day of January following their election, and until their successors are 
chosen and qualified. Vacancies are filled in accordance with the 
provisions of section 142, 143 or 144 of chapter 54 of the General Laws. 

Under the provisions of section 8 of chapter 409 of the Acts of 1937, 
upon the death, resignation or removal of any special judge of probate 
and insolvency, the office is abolished without further action by the 
general court. Under chapter 436 of the Acts of 1949, the special 
judge of probate and insolvency for Hampshire County may act in 
the counties of Hampden, Berkshire and Franklin. 

By the provisions of section 53 of chapter 221 of the General Laws, 
as amended by chapter 151 of the Acts of 1939, the Governor, with 
the advice and consent of the Council, is required to appoint in each 
county, as vacancies occur, a certain number of Masters in Chancery, 
who rnay art throughout the Commonwealth and who shall hold 
office for five years. 

Under the provisions of section 1 of chapter 194 of the General Laws 
the Governor, with the advice and consent of the Council, is required 
to appoint in each county one or more public administrators, not 
e.xceeding six in Middlesex and in Suffolk or five in any other county, 
who shall hold office for five years. 



348 



County Officers. 



J 



[Corrected to April 26, 1963.] 

BARNSTABLE COUNTY — Incorpor.\ted 1685. 

Shire Town, Barnstable. 

Judge of Probate and Insolvency — Kenrick A. Sparrow, Orleans. 
Register of Probate and Insolvency — Alfred C. Knight, Cotuit. 

Assistant Register — Myra E. Jerauld, Barnstable. 
Sheriff — Donald P. Tulloch, Barnstable. 
Clerk of Courts — Barbara Holmes Neil, Barnstable. 

Assistant Clerk — Sheila Chase, Cummaquid. 
County Treasurer — Bruce K. Jerauld, Barnstable. 
Register of Deeds — Dean S. Sears, East Dennis. 

Assistant Register — Jay Walter Mead, Orleans. 

County Commissioners — 

H, Heyworth Backus, Centerville 
' Nathan S. EUis, Jr., Falmouth 

Oscar J. Cahoon, Harwich . 
Masters in Chancery — 

Harold W. Sullivan, Barnstable 

John C. Snow, Provincetown 
Public Administrators — 

John P. Sylvia, Jr., Falmouth 

Robert W. MacDonald, Sandwich 

John P. Curley, Jr., Barnstable 

John W. Holland, Jr., Falmouth 

Charles J. Ardeto, West Yarmouth 



Term expires January, 



Term expires June, 



Term expires April, 

January, 
" " December, 



1965 
1965 
1967 

1964 
1964 

1964 
1965 
1965 
1967 
1967 



BERKSHIRE COUNTY — Incorporated 1761. 

Shire Town, Pittsfield. 

/ Judge of Probate and Insolvency — F. Anthony Hanlon, Pittsfield. 
Register of Probate and Insolvency — James W. Carolan, Pittsfield. 

Assistant Register — Helen S. Purnell, Pittsfidd. 
Sheriff — John D. Courtney, Jr., Williamstown. 
Clerk of Courts — Nelson A. Foot, Jr., Pittsfield. 

Assistant Clerk — Irene Sauve, Adams. 
County Treasurer — John J. Shields, Pittsfield. 
Registers of Deeds — 

Middle District, Harold F. Goggins, Pittsfield. 

Northern District, Edward W. Buckley, Jr., North Adams. 

Southern District, James J. Comerford, Great Barrington. 



County Officers. 349 



BERKSHIRE COUNTY — Concluded. 

Assistant Registers — 

Middle District, Albert W. Cheevers, Pittsfield. 
Northern District, Hectorine A. San Soucie, Adams. 
Southern District, Rose L. Gardella, Great Harrington. 
County Commissioners — 

Matthew J. Collins, Lanesborough Term expires January, 1965 
John J. Shea, Pittsfield. . . " " '* 1965 

James A. Bowes, North Adams • " " " 1967 

Public Administrators — 

Bernard Lenhoff, North Adams . Term expires February, 1966 
Charles R. Alberti. Jr., Pittsfield . " " April. 1966 

W. Stanley Cooke, Pittsfield . . " " September, 1966 

James W. Lilly, North Adams , " " November, 1966 

Sidney Q. Curtiss, Sheffield . . " " January, 1967 



BRISTOL COUNTY — Incorporated 1685. 

Shire Towns, Taunton and New Bedford. 

Judges of Probate and Insolvency — Walter L. Considine, New Bedford, i^ 

Beatrice H. Mullaney, Fall River, i^ 
Registry of Probate and Insolvency — James B. Kelley, Fall River. 
Assistant Registers — 

Grace E. Avila, Somerset. 
Mary E. Dahill, Taunton. 
Sheriff — Edward K. Dabrowski, New Bedford. 
Clerk of Courts — William P. Grant, Fall River. 
Assistant Clerk — Marcellus D. Lemaire, Taunton. 
Second Assistant Clerk — Thomas M. Quinn, Jr., Dartmouth. 
Third Assistant Clerk — John H. O'Neil, Fall River. 
Fourth Assistatit Clerk — Emma R. Andrade, Taunton. 
County Treasurer — Ernest W. Kilroy, Fall River. 
Registers of Deeds — 

Northern District, Henry G. Crapo, Taunton. 
Southern District, Joseph A. Sylvia, Jr., New Bedford. 
Fall River District, Joseph E. Hanify, Jr., Fall River. 
Assistant Registers — 

Northern District, Francis H. Hackett, Taunton. 
Southern District, John Gomes, New Bedford. 
Fall River District, Frank D. O'Brien, Fall River. 
County Commissioners — 

Charles A. Frates. New Bedford . Term expires January, 1965 
Patrick H. Harrington, Jr., Somerset " " " 1965 

Arthur R. Machado, Fall River . " " *' 1967 



350 County Officers. 



BRISTOL COUNTY — Concluded. 

Masters in Chancery — 

Frank V. Phillipe, Taunton . . Term expire? June, 1963 

John T. Farrell, Jr., Fall River . *' " January, 1966 

Benjamin A. Friedman, Taunton . " " " 1966 

George M. Thomas, New Bedford " " " 1966 

John Michael Xifores, New Bedford " " " 1968 

Public Administrators — 

Salvatore L. Arieta, Taunton . Term expires April, 1964 

John D. Sheehan, New Bedford . " " May, 1964 

Edward F. Harrington, New Bedford " " October, 1964 

Donald R. Kelly, Fall River . " " December, 1965 

Frank R. DiRengo, North Attleborough" " " 1967 



DUKES COUNTY — Incorporated 1695. 
Shire Town, Edgartowx. 



v/ 



Judge of Probate and Insolvency — Arthur W. Davis, Edgartown. 

Register of Probate and Insolvency — Mary W. Wimpenney, Edgar- 
town. 

Sheriff — 'iohn E. Palmeira, West Tisbury. 

Clerk of Courts — Sophia B. Campos, Tisbury. 

County Treasurer — Allan Keniston, West Tisbury. 

Register of Deeds — Philip J. Norton, Edgartown. 

County Commissioners — 

Antone H. Alley, Oak Bluffs . Term expire? January, 1965 

Kenneth T. Galley, Edgartown . " " " 1965 

Dean R. Swift, Tisbury . . " " " 1967 

Public Administrator — 

John B. Nichols, Tisbury . . Term expires November, 1963 



ESSEX COUNTY — Incorporated 1643. 
Shire Towns, Salem, Lawrence and Newburyport. 

Judges of Probate and Insolvency — 

John V. Phelan, Lynn, v^ , 

John A. Costello, Andover. ' 
Register of Probate and Insolvency — John J. Costello, North Andover. 

Assistant Register — Irving E. Kane, Lynn. 

Second Assistant Register — Donald F. Smith, North Andover. 

Third Assistant Register — Arthur J. Frawley, Jr., Lynn. 
Sheriff— Earl E. Wells, Salem. 



Coimty Officers. 



351 



ESSEX COUNTY — Concluded. 

Clerk of Courts — Philip A. Hennessey, Peabody. 
Assistant Clerk — Charles H. Metcalf, Rowley. 
Second Assistant Clerk — ■ E. Philip Littlefield, Marblehead. 
Third Assistant Clerk — Herbert \V. Levesque, Danvers. 
Fourth Assistant Clerk — Robert J. Sweeney, Beverly. 
Fifth Assistant Clerk — William J. Greenler, Jr., Boxford. 
Sixth Assistant Clerk — John P. Keane, Lynn. 
Seventh Assistant Clerk — Edward D. Sullivan, Lawrence. 
County Treasurer — Thomas F. Duffy, Lynn. 
Registers of Deeds — 

Northern District, G. Hudson Driver, LawTence. 

Southern District, Leo H. Jones, Marblehead. 
Assistant Registers — 

Northern District, Helen M. Lyons, Lawrence. 

Southern District. / J°hn P. Cullinane, Manchester. 
\ Gerald L. Soucy, Beverly. 
County Commissioners — 

Daniel J. Burke, Lynnfield . 
C. F. Nelson Pratt, Saugus . 
Edward H. Cahill, Lynn 
Masters in Chancery — 

Raymond M. Sullivan. Ipswich 
John F. Fenton, Jr., LawTence 
Jeremiah \\. Doyle, 3rd, Newburyport 
James P. Reardon, Newburyport . 
Ignatius R. J. Piscitiello, Lawrence 
John F. O'Leary, Salem 
Daniel Higgins Silver, Saugus 
Thomas J. Allen, Lawrence . 
Francis A. Pazzi, Jr., Lynn . 
John J. Quinlan, Peabody 
Louis A. Cyr, Merrimac 
Public Administrators — 
Shirley A. Lipinski, Lynn 
Robert J. Weber, Lynn 

William L. Mahoney, Jr., Salem . " " May, 

George Karelitz, Haverhill . . " " March, 

Charles W. Trombly, North Andover " " January 



Term expires January, 



Term expires June, 

August, 



October, 
January, 



October 



Term expires January, 



1965 
1965 
1967 

1963 
1965 
1965 
1966 
1966 
1966 
1966 
1966 
1966 
1966 
1966 

1964 
1964 
1965 
1966 
1968 



FRANKLIN COUNTY — Incorpor.\ted 1811. 
Shire Town, Greenfield. 



^ 



Judge of Probate and Insolvency — Samuel T. Tisdale. Greenfield. 
Register of Probate and Insolvency — Lawrence A. Comins, Greenfield. 
Assistant Register — Margaret H. Bellows, Greenfield. 



erm expires October, 


1964 


March, 


1966 


October, 


1967 



352 County Officers. 



FRANKLIN COUKTY — Concluded. 

Sheriff — Thonxdi's, Geary, Orange. 
Clerk of Courts — John R. Moseley, Montague. 
County Treasurer — Gerard M. Fritz, Greenfield. 
Register of Deeds — Carlos Allen, Deerfield. 

Assistant Register — Mary E. Boyden, Greenfield. 

County Commissioners — 

Thomas Herlihy, Deerfield . . Term expires January, 1965 

Harry F. Koch, Shelburne . . " " " 1965 

Frank H. Reed, Greenfield . . " " " 1967 

Master in Chancery — 

Douglas E. O'Neill, Greenfield . Term expires January, 1966 

Public Administrators — 

Allan McGuane, Greenfield . 
Philip H. Ball, Jr., Deerfield 
John R. Moseley, Montague 



HAMPDEN COUNTY — Incorporated 1812. 

Shire Town, Springfield. 

Judges of Probate and Insolvency — 
Thomas H. Stapleton, Agawam. v, 
Abraham I. Smith, Springfield, v 

Register of Probate and Insolvency — John J. Lyons, Springfield. 
Assistant Registers — 

Katherine M. Connell, Springfield. 
William M. Long, Springfield. 
Evelyn C. Lavallette, Feeding Hills. 

Sheriff — idhn G. Curley, Springfield. 

Clerk of Courts — Edward G. Shea, Springfield. 

Assistant Clerk — Edward J. Farrell, Longmeadow. 
Second Assistant Clerk — Edward J. McKay, Russell. 
Third Assistant Clerk — • Helen Z. Greeley, Springfield. 
Fourth Assistant Clerk — Thomas B. Malone, Springfield. 

County Treasurer — Daniel M. Walsh, Jr., Springfield. 

Register of Deeds — John Pierce Lynch, Springfield. 
Assistant Registers — • 

Susan C. McKenna, Springfield. 
B. Louise Sullivan, Holyoke. 
County Commissioners — 

William F. Stapleton, Holyoke . Term expires January, 1965 
Ralph P. Walsii, Longmeadow . *' " " 1965 

Thomas F. Sullivan, Springfield . " '* " 1967 



County Officers. 



353 



HAMPDEN COUNTY — Concluded. 



Masters in Chancery — 

Maurice H. Baitler, Wilbraham 
William J. Kern, Springfield 
William G. Milroy, Ludlow . 
Patricia C. Smith, Palmer . 
Clayton N. Fuller, Wilbraham 
Harry O. Eberhardt, Springfield 

Public Administrators — 

Michael J. Donohue, Holyoke 
George C. Keady, Jr., Longmeadow 
Frank J. McKay, Holyoke . 
Robert D. Moran, Springfield 



Term expires April, 


1965 


" " 


" 


1965 


" " 


August, 


1965 


" " 


June, 


1967 




August, 


1967 


" 


January, 


1968 


Term expires March, 


1964 


" " 


February, 


1966 


" 


October, 


1966 


« 


January, 


1967 



HAMPSHIRE COUNTY — Incorporated 1662. 



Shire Town, Northampton. 



Judge of Probate and Insolvency — Harry Jekanowski, Northampton. 



y 



special Judge of Probate and Insolvency — Arthur W. Cook, North- 
ampton. 

Register of Probate and Insolvency — Frank E. Tuit, 2d, Northampton. 
Assistant Register — Kathleen A. Flynn, Northampton. 

Sheriff — John F. Boyle, Northampton. 

Clerk of Courts — ■ Merrill E. Torrey, Northampton. 
Assistant Clerk — Norma J. Thibodo, Northampton. 



l/ 



County Treasurer — 

Register of Deeds — 
Assistant Register 



Howard A. Banner, Goshen. 
Raymond A. Warner, Williamsburg. 



County Commissioners — 

Raymond A. Lyman, Easthampton 
Edwin M. Podolak, Hadley . 
Hiram H. Brownell. Northampton. 

Public Administrators — 

John F. Foley, Northampton 
John F. Murphy, Jr., Northampton 
Robert T. Doyle, Northampton 
James C. O'Donnell, Northampton 
Kenneth B. Bowen, Northampton 



Katheiine E. O'C. O'Donnell, Northampton 
Term expires January 



Term expires May, 

" November, 
" " January, 

May, 



1965 
1965 
1967 

1965 
1965 
1966 
1966 
1967 



354 County Officers. 



ISIIDDLESEX COUNTY — Incorporated 1643. 

Shire Towns, Cambridge (East) and Lowell. 

Judges of Probate and Insolver^cy — 
John C. Leggat, Lowell, v' 
Joseph W. Monahan, Belmont.'' y 

Frederick V. McMenimen, Belmont. v- 

Register oj Probate and Insolvency — John V. Harvey, Belmont. 
Assistant Register — Warren J. Fitzgerald, Belmont. 
Second Assistant Register — Margaret C. Downey, Cambridge. 
Third Assistayit Register — William F. Chisholm, Belmont. 
Fourth Assistant Register — Henry McConville, Wakefield. 
Fifth Assistant Register — Sheila McGovern, Cambridge. 

Sheriff — Howard W. Fitzpatrick, Maiden. 

Clerk of Courts — Edward J. Sullivan, Cambridge. 
Assistant Clerk — Calvin A. Burger, Lowell. 
Second Assistant Clerk — Harold E. Lyons, Westtord. 
Third Assistant Clerk — Raymond E. Powell, Watertown. 
Fourth Assistant Clerk — Walter T. Johnson, Lexington. 
Fifth Assistattt Clerk — Paul Sostek, Waban. 
Sixth Assistant Clerk — Howard W. Coloitts, Arlington. 
Seventh Assistant Clerk — Chester P. McDonald, Lowell. 
Eighth Assistant Clerk — Robert F. Trant, Arlington. 
Ninth Assistant Clerk — Philip E. Ewell, Medtord. 
Tenth Assistant Clerk — Walter J. Sullivan, Cambridge. 
Eleventh Assistant Clerk — John J. Wrenn, Cambridge. 
Twelfth Assistant Clerk — John C. Weilandt, Belmont. 
Thirteenth Assistant Clerk — Francis X. Deely, Cambridge. 
Fourteenth Assistant Clerk — William P. Johnston, Medford. 

County Treasurer — Edward L. Buckley, Somerville. 

Registers of Deeds — 

Northern District, Frederick J. Finnegan. Lowell. 
Southern District, Edmund C. Buckley, Cambridge. 

Assistant Registers — 

Northern District, Emmett L. Beane, Billerica. 

f Francis E. McKenna, Arlington, 
o u T^- ♦ • * WiUiam H. Rockwell, Jr., Waltham. 
Southern District. > ^^^^^^ Connolly. Natick. 

[ Benedict F. Brady, Medford. 

County Commissioners — 

William G. Andrew, Cambridge . Term expires January, 1965 

John F. Dever, Jr., Woburn . . " " " 1965 

Thomas B. Brennan, Medford . " " " 1967 



County Officers. 



355 



MIDDLESEX COUNTY — Concluded. 



Masters in Chancery — 

Nicholas J. Vergados, Lowell 
William E. O'Halloran, Newton 
Robert Mahoney, Arlington . 
Walter T. Healey, Newton . 
Louis M. Saab, Lowell 
John A. Derba, Jr., Maiden . 
John J. Nixon, Jr., Belmont 
Horace N. Formichelli. Arlington 
Melvin J. Dangle. Newton . 
Charles E. Dockser, Newton 

Public Administrators — 

William J. Kittredge, Hudson 
Victor H. Galvani, Framingham 
Arthur M. Bobrick, Newton 
Moses M. Frankel, Wakefield 
George P. Jeffreys, Lowell 



. Term expire? 


April, 


1964 






' 


" 


1964 






• 


May, 


1964 








June, 


1964 








March, 


1965 






' 


April, 


1965 








September 


1965 
1965 








March, 


1966 




• ** 


October, 


1966 


. Term expire 


^ December, 


1963 


" " 


January, 


1964 




November, 


1966 


. 


December, 


1966 


. 






March. 


1967 



NANTUCKET COUNTY — Inxorporated 1695. 

Shire Town, Nantucket. 

Judge of Probate and Insolvency — Jeremiah J. Sullivan, Cambridge. V 

Register of Probate and Insolvency — John J. Gardner, 2d. 

Assistant Register — Mrs. Irene M. Smith. 

Sheriff— Paul M. Frye. 

Clerk of Courts — Wesley A. Fordyce. 

County Treasurer — Mrs. Margaret M. Roche. 

Register of Deeds — Josiah S. Barrett. 

Note. — The Selectmen of the town of Nantucket have the powers 
and perform the duties of County Commissioners. The Treasurer of 
the town is also County Treasurer. 



NORFOLK COUNTY — Incorporated 1793. 
Shire Town, Dedham. 



Judges of Probate and Insolvency — 
James F. Reynolds, Quincy. "^ 
William J. Hickey. Jr., Brookline. 
J. John Fox, Boston, i/ 



/ 



356 



County Officers. 



NORFOLK COUNTY — Concluded. 

Register of Probate and Insolvency — Anna E. Hirsch, Dedham. 

Assistant Register — Bennett V. McLaughlin, Holbrook. 

Second Assistant Register — Edgar W. Stiles, Weymouth. 

Third Assistant Register — Mary M. Nixon. Brookline. 

Fourth Assistant Register — Ethel M. Fisher, Westwood. 
Sheriff— Charles W. Hedges, Quincy. 
Clerk of Courts — WiWis A. Neal, Canton. 

Assistant Clerk — A. Clinton Kellogg, Sharon. 

Second Assistant Clerk — Peter C. Huckins, Sharon. 

Third Assistant Clerk — Henry G. Hetnik, Brookline. 
County Treasurer — Raymond C. Warmington, Quincy. 
Register of Deeds — • L. Thomas Shine, Dedham. 

Assistant Register — Charles N. Ross, Quincy. 
County Commissioners — 

Russell T. Bates, Quincy 

Clayton W. Nash, Weymouth 

John F. Murphy, Braintree . 
Masters in Chancery — 

Edmund D. Duffy, Milton . 

Thomas K. McManus, Norwood 

Robert D. O'Leary, Milton . 

L. Paul Marini, Quincy 

Karl Greenman, Brookline . 
Public Administrators — 

Joseph H. Cordelia, Milton . 

Leon Steinberg, Brookline 

Joseph T. Wood, Weymouth. 

Harry L. Rose, Brookline 

James R. Lawler, Needham . 



. Term expires January, 


1965 


. 


1965 


" " " 


1967 


. Term expires July, 


1964 


September, 


1965 


January, 


1966 


" September 


1966 


February, 


1967 


. Term expires November, 


1963 


January, 


1964 


•• .t •• 


1964 


April, 


1965 


December, 


1967 



PLYMOUTH COUNTY — Incorporated 1685. 
Shire Town, Plymouth. 
Judge of Probate and Insolvency — Harry K. Stone, Brockton 
Register of Probate and Insolvency — Walter H. Gilday, Brockton 

Assistant Register — Barbara W. Whiting, Plymouth. 
Sheriff — Adnzh H. Harlow, Plymouth. 
Clerk of Courts — Robert S. Prince, Brockton. 

Assistant Clerk — Arthur T. Murphy, Brockton. 

Second Assistant Clerk — John A. Vitale, Brockton. 
County Treasurer — Charles W. Williams, East Bridgewater. 
Register of Deeds — Richard W. Holm, Hingham. 

Assistant Register — Frank E. Parris, Pembroke. 



y 



County Officers. 357 



PLYMOUTH COUNTY — Concluded. 

County Commissioners — 

Mrs. Elva M. Bent, Brockton . Term expires January, 1965 

Norman G. MacDonald, Hanson . " " " 1965 

George A. Ridder, East Bridgewater " " " 1967 

Masters in Chancery — 

Carlos Francis Hill, Hanover . Term expires September, 1964 

Daniel A. Sullivan, Hull . . " " August. 1965 

John P. Ryan. Plymouth . . " " January. 1966 

Theodore J. Markus, Holbrook . " " " 1966 

Courtland A. Mathers, W. Bridgewater " " March, 1966 

Alvin Jack Sims, Brockton . . " " February, 1967 

Public Administrators — 

Henry C. Gill, Brockton . . Term expires December, 1963 

William A. Farley, Jr., Brockton . " " November, 1966 

Cornelius F. Dineen, Brockton . " " January, 1967 

Sumner A. Chapman, Jr., Plymouth " " August, 1967 

SUFFOLK COUNTY — Incorporated 1643. 

Judges of Probate and Insolvency —■ 

John V. Mahoney, Boston, v 

Robert Gardiner Wilson, Jr.. Boston, v 

Edmund V. Keville, Belmont. \/ 
Register of Probate and Insolvency — Louis F. Musco, Boston. 

Assistayii Register — John A. Griffin, Boston. 

Second Assistant Register — Henry J. Allen, Boston. 

Third Assistant Register — Jeremiah E. Sullivan, Boston. 

Fourth Assistant Register — Arthur A. Kelly, Boston. 

Fifth Assistant Register — Mary C. Fitzpatrick, Boston. 
Sheriff — Frederick R. Sullivan. Boston. 
Clerk of Supreme Judicial Court* — Chester A. Dolan, Jr., Boston. 

Assistant Clerk of Supreme Judicial Court* — Leo A. Reed, Boston. 

Second Assistant Clerk — Daniel D. Donnelly. Boston. 
Clerk of Superior Court {Civil Session) — Thomas Dorgan, Boston. 
Clerk of Superior Court {Criminal Session) — Edward V. Keating, 

Boston. 
County Treasurer — James E. Gildea, Boston.f 
County Auditor — John T. Leonard, Boston. J 
Register of Deeds — Joseph D. Coughlin. Boston. 

Assistant Register — John J. McCarthy, Boston. 

Second Assistant Register — Edward T. Cady, Boston. 

Third Assistant Register — Lawrence J. Fallon, Boston. 

Fourth Assistant Register — John Barry, Boston. 

Technical Assistant — Jacob M. Levenson, Boston. 

♦ For the County. 

t Treasurer of the city of Boston. 

X Auditor of the city of Boston. 



358 



County Officers. 



SUFFOLK COUNTY — Concluded. 



Masters in Chancery — 

John E. Connelly, Boston 

Joseph J. Piilgini, Boston 

James W. Kelley, Boston 

Robert F. McNeil, Boston 

Benjamin Gargill, Boston 

Frank A. R. Murray, Boston 

Charles P. Burgess, Boston 

Vincent E. Pickulo, Boston 

Joseph W. D. Cavlo, Revere 

Stephen T. Landoulis, Boston 
Public Administrators — 

Frank M. Leonardi, Boston . 

Paul H. Snow, Boston . 

Charles E. Englert, Boston . 

Paul E. Mitchell, Boston 

Benjamin S. Freeman, Boston 

Paul J. Burns, Boston . 

Note. — The Mayor and City Counc 



Term expires May, 
" " March, 

May, 
January, 
March, 
June, 
" " January, 

February, 

March, 

Term expires April, 



May, 

November, 

October, 



Aldermen of Chelsea and the City Council of Revere, in their respec 



live cities, and the Selectmen of Winthrop 



1963 
1965 
1965 
1966 
1966 
1966 
1967 
1967 
1967 
1967 

1964 
1964 
1964 
1964 
1965 
1967 
1 of Boston, the Board of 



in said town, have most of 



the powers and duties of County Commissioners 



WORCESTER COUNTY — Incorporated 1731. 

Shire Towns, Worcester and Fitchburg. 

Judges of Probate and I'/isolvency —. 
Carl E. Wahlstrom, \\'orcester. '*' 
George E. Rice, Worcester. v 
Register of Probate and Insolvency — F. Joseph Donohue, Worcester. 
Assistant Registers — 

Roger Hamilton, \^'orcester. 
Katherine G. Doherty, Worcester. 
Robert E. Reiman, Worcester. 
John P. Mahoney, Worcester. 
Sheriff — Joseph A. Smith, Worcester. 
Clerk of Courts — James J. Joyce, Worcester. 
Assistant Olerk — Wilfred B. Feiga, Worcester. 
Second Assistant Cjerk — Arthur H. Sheedy, Worcester. 
Third Assistant Clerk — Mary A. Leary, Worcester. 
Fourth Assistant Cflerk — Charles S. Saraborski, Worcester. 
Fifth Assistant Clerk — Frederick F. Beringer, Worcester. 
Sixth Assistant Clerk — Anthony D. Masiello, Worcester. 
Seventh Assistant Clerk — John F. O'Connor, Worcester 



County Officers. 



359 



WORCESTER COUNTY — Concluded. 

County Treasurer — Alexander G. Lajoie, Worcester. 
Registers of Deeds — 

Northern District. Bernard T. Moynihan, Fitchburg. 

Worcester District, Robert R. Gallagher, Worcester. 
Assistant Registers — 

Northern District, Bernard M. Sweeney, Fitchburg. 

Worcester District, { ^^''"'^"^ J" Mullen Northboro. 
\ Richard F. Sheridan, Paxton. 

County Commissioners — 

Joseph A. Aspero, Worcester. 

Francis E. Cassidy, Webcter 

Edward P. Bird, Fitchburg . 
Masters in Chancery — 

Rosario C. Arpin, Southbridge 

Thomah M. Dooling, Fitchburg 

William H. Cassidy, 2d, Dudley . 

Lawrence H. Fisher, \\'orcester 

Anthony N. Tomasiello, Worcester 

Joseph V. Langev'in, Southbridge . 

Roger F. Fitzpatrick, Southbridge 
Public Administrators — 

Franklyn J. Scola, Worcester 

Austin J. Kittredge, Clinton 

Jacob J. Kressler, Worcester 

Nathaniel A. Cohen, Worcester 

Ekiward J. McCabe, Worcester 



Term expires January, 



Term expires January, 
April. 



January, 

August. 

September, 



Term expires September, 
May, 
July. 
" December, 
" " September, 



1965 
19 5 

1967 

1963 
1963 
1963 
1963 
1966 
1967 
1967 

1963 
1964 
1964 
1965 
1967 



COUNTY PERSONNEL BOARD. 

[Established by Section 48 o/ Chapter 35 of the General Laws {1930. 
400, § 5), elected by and from the Several Boards of County CommiS' 
sioners.\ 
H. Hayworth Backus, Barnstable County 

Term expires September 1, 1963 
John F. Shea, Berkshire County . " " " 1964 

Francis E. Cassidy, Worcester County " " " 1965 

Arthur H. MacKinnon, Director of Accounts. 



360 Medical Examiners. 



MEDICAL EXAMINERS. 

[See Chapter 38 of the General Laws.] 
(Corrected to May 23, 1963.) 



District Barnstable County. 

1. — Harwich, Dennis, Yarmouth, Brewster, Chatham, Orleans and 

Eastham. — Joseph N. Kelly, Orleans, 1967. Associate 
(vacancy). 

2. — Barnstable, Bourne, Sandwich, Mashpee and Falmouth. — 

Robert S. Thrope, Barnstable, 1964. Associates, Edwin P. 
Tripp, Jr., Falmouth, 1968; John H. Lewis, Sandwich, 1968. 

3. — Provincetown, Truro and Wellfleet. — Daniel H. Hiebert, Prov- 

incetown, 1963. Associate, Sidney B. Callis, Wellfleet, 1966. 

District. Berkshire County. 

1. — North Adams, Williamstown, Clarksburg, Adams, Florida, Sa- 

voy, New Ashford and Cheshire. — George T. Mullen, North 
Adams, 1963. Associate, Arthur W. Burckel, Adams, 1967. 

2. — Pittsfield, Lanesborough, Windsor, Dalton, Hinsdale, Peru and 

Hancock. — Antonio P. Desautels, Pittsfield, 1964. Associate, 
Clayton W. Nesbit, Pittsfield, 1964. 

3. — Richmond, Lenox, Washington, Becket, Lee, Stockbridge, Ty- 

ringham and Otis. — George S. Wickham, Lee, 1968. Asso- 
ciate, Edward R. Messer, Lenox, 1968. 

4. — West Stockbridge, Alford, Great Barrington, Monterey, Sandis- 

field, New Marlborough, Sheffield, Egremont and Mt. Wash- 
ington. — Arthur L. Cassel, Great Barrington, 1969. Asso- 
ciate, Thomas J. Gilligan, Jr., Great Barrington, 1967. 

District. Bristol County. 

1. — Attleboro, North Attleborough, Seekonk, Norton, Mansfield 

and Rehoboth. — Rudolph Osgood, Norton, 1965. Associate, 
James N. Shamey, Attleboro, 1966. 

2. — Taunton, Raynham, Easton, Berkley and Dighton. — Joseph E. 

Nunes, Taunton, 1965. Associate, William H. Bennett, Jr., 
Taunton, 1969. 

3. — Fall River, Somerset, Swansea, Freetown and Westport. — 

Arthur LaSalle, Somerset, 1964. Associate, Raymond R. 
Costa. Fall River, 1966. 

4. — New Bedford, Dartmouth, Fairhaven and Acushnet. — Stanley 

J. Koczera, New Bedford, 1966. Associate, Manuel F. Sousa, 
New Bedford, 1970. 



Medical Examiners. 361 



Dukes CouNry. 
District. 

1. — Edgartown and Oak Bluffs. — Robert W. Nevin, Edgartown, 

1969. Associate, Donald R. Mills, Edgartown, 1968. 

2. — Tisbury, West Tisbury and Gosnold. — Joseph Frisch, Tisbury, 

1965. Associate, Ralph J. Mitchell, Tisbury, 1969. 

3. — Chilmark and Gay Head. — David Rappaport, Oak Bluffs, 1963. 

Essex County. 
District. 

1. — Gloucester and Rockport. — John J. Egan, Jr., Gloucester, 

1968. Associate, George J. Pohas, Gloucester, 1968. 

2. — Ipswich, Rowley, Hamilton and Essex. — William C. Wiggles- 

worth, Ipswich, 1969. Associate, T. Herbert Foote, Ipswich, 
1968. 

3. — Newburyport, Newbury, West Newbury, Amesbury and Salis- 

bury. — Daniel Lyons Leary, Newburyport, 1965. Asso- 
ciate, James F. Whitten, Amesbury, 1963. 

4. — Haverhill and Merrimac. — John P. Creed, Haverhill, 1964. 

Associate, John D. Shinberg, Haverhill, 1964. 

5. — Lawrence, Methuen, Andover and North Andover. — John T. 

Batal, Andover, 1966. Associate, Paul A. Oskar, Lawrence, 
1966. 

6. — Georgetown, Boxford, Topsfield and Groveland. — Elmer S. 

Bagnall, Groveland, 1969. Associate, Douglas V. Crook, 
Groveland, 1969. 

7. — Beverly, Wenham and Manchester. — Samuel M. Albert, 

Beverly, 1967. Associate, Herman B. Crush, Beverly, 1968. 

8. — Peabody, Danvers, Middleton and Lynnfield. — Dougald C. 

MacGillivray, Danvers, 1970. Associate, Ralph E. Foss, Pea- 
body, 1963. 

9. — Lynn, Saugus, Nahant and Swampscott. — Edmund A. Jannino, 

Lynn, 1965. Associate, Francis A. Pirone, Lynn, 1970. 
10. — Salem and Marblehead. — J. Robert Shaughnessy, Salem, 1967. 
Associate, Arthur W. O'Neil, Salem. 1967. 

Franklin County. 

District. 

Northern. — Orange, Erving, Warwick, New Salem and Wendell. — 
Frank B. Souter, Orange, 1970. Associate, George K. Gould, 
Orange, 1969. 

Eastern. — Bernardston, Gill, Greenfield, Leverett, Montague, North- 
field, Shutesbury and Sunderland. — Howard M. Kemp, 
Greenfield, 1969. Associate, Henry A. Rys, Montague, 1969. 



362 Medical Examiners. 

Franklin County — Concluded. 

District. 

Western. — Ashfield, Buckland, Charlemont, Colrain, Conway, Deer- 
field, Hawley, Heath, Leyden, Monroe, Rowe, Shelburne and 
Whately. — John H. Oison, Colrain, 1966. Associale, Louis 
S. Boeh, Conway, 1968. 



Hampden County. 
District. 

1. — Brimfield, Holland, Palmer, Monson and Wales. — Benjamin 

Schneider, Monson, 1968. Associate, Harry J. Anton, Palmer, 
1968. 

2. — Springfield, Agawam, East Longmeadow, Longmeadow, West 

Springfield, Wilbraham and Hampden. — William Mosig, 
West Springfield, 1968. Associate, Harry G. Tapp, Springfield, 
1968. 

3. — Holyoke. — Edmund J. Zielinski, Holyoke, 1965. Associate, 

George L. Ross, Holyoke, 1965. 

4. — Blandford, Chester, Granville, Montgomery, Russell, South- 

wick, Tolland and Westfield. — Arthur J. Logie, Westfield, 
1970. Associate, Jacob Arensten, Russell, 1967. 

5. — Chicopee and Ludlow. — Edward L Kraus, Chicopee, 1967. 

Associate (vacancy). 



Hampshire County. 
District. 

1. — Northampton, Chesterfield, Cummington, Goshen, Hatfield, 

Plainfield and Williamsburg. — Thomas F. Corriden, North- 
ampton, 1964. Associale, John J. Curran, Northampton, 1967. 

2. — Easthampton, Huntington, Middlefield, Southampton, West- 

hampton and Worthington. — Henry E. Donais, North- 
ampton, 1963. Associate, John A. Huflfmire, Huntington, 
1964. 

3. — Amherst, Granby, Hadley, Pelham and South Hadley. — 

Maurice T. Kennedy, Hadley, 1967. Associate, R. Sheldon 
Clapp, Amherst, 1969. 

4. — Belchertown, Enfield,* Greenwich,* Prescott* and Ware. — 

Tracey L. Roberson, Ware, 1967. Associate, Kenneth L. 
Collard, Belchertown, 1964. 



♦Terminated. See Acts of 1927, chapter 321; Acts of 1938, chapters 
240 and 455. 



Medical Examiners. 363 



Middlesex County. 
District. 

1. — Cambridge. Belmont and Arlington. — David C. Dow, Cam- 

bridge, 1964. Associate, Peter A. Delmonico, Belmont, 1966. 

2. — Maiden, Somerville, Everett and Medford. — Andrew D. 

Guthrie, Medford, 1967. Associate, Sidney S. Listernick, 
Everett. 1968. 

3. — Melrose, Stoneham, Wakefield, Wilmington, Reading and North 

Reading. — Thomas P. Devlin, Stoneham, 1965. Associate, 
John J. McNulty, Wakefield, 1965. 

4. — Woburn, Winchester, Lexington and Burlington. — J. Vincent 

DiRago. Woburn. 1965. Associate, C. Reginald Hardcastle, 
Woburn, 1969. 

5. — Lowell, Dracut, Tewksbury, Billerica, Chelmsford and Tyngs- 

borough. — Lawrence F. McCartin, Lowell, 1965. Associate, 
John Karbowniczak, Jr., Lowell, 1965. 

6. — Concord, Carlisle, Bedford, Lincoln, Littleton, Acton and Box- 

borough. — Howard E. Robinson, Concord, 1965. Associate, 
Leroy Price Houck, Concord, 1968. 

7. — Newton, Waltham, Watertown and Weston. — Peter Angelo,Wal- 

tham, 1970. Associate, William A. Richards, Waltham, 1964. 

8. — Framingham, Wayland, Natick, Sherborn, Holliston, Hopkin- 

ton and Ashland. — Antonio A. Matarese, Framingham, 1970. 
Associate, Arthur E. Taddeo, Xatick, 1969. 

9. — Marlborough, Hudson, Maynard, Stow and Sudbury. — Robert 

M. Rittenhouse, Hudson, 1965. Associate, Kenneth B. Green- 
leaf, Marlborough, 1963. 
10. — Ayer, Groton, Westford, Dunstable. Pepperell. Shirley, Town- 
send and Ashby. — Lawrence A. Churchville, Townsend, 1966. 
Associate (vacancy). 

Nantucket County. 
District. 
1. — Ernest H. Menges, Nantucket, 1965. Associate, George A. 
Folger, Nantucket, 1965. 

Norfolk County. 
District. 

1. — Dedham. Needham, Wellesley, Westwood, Norwood and Dover. 

— Joseph A. King, Needham, 1964. Associate, John J. Kraw, 
Dedham, 1965. 

2. — Cohasset. — Edward A. McCarthy, Cohasset, 1969. Associate, 

Edward H. Schott. Cohasset, 1963. 



364 Medical Examiners. 

Norfolk County — Concluded. 
District. 

3. — Quincy, Milton and Randolph. — George D. Dalton, Quincy, 

1966. Associate, Frederic Tudor, Milton, 1969. 

4. — Weymouth, Braintree and Holbrook. — Robert R. Ryan, Wey- 

mouth, 1967. Associate, Archie G. Keigan, Braintree, 1970. 

5. — Avon, Stoughton, Canton, Walpole and Sharon. — Appleton*C. 

Woodward, Stoughton, 1969. Associate, Franklin H. Jacobson, 
Avon, 1970. 

6. — Franklin, Foxborough, Plainville and Wrentham. — Walter F. 

Crowley, Franklin, 1967. Associate, James J. Putnam, Fox- 
borough, 1968. 

7. — Medway, Medfield, Millis, Norfolk and Bellingham. — Harold 

L. Shenker, West Medway, 1970. Associate, Jacob Zalvan, 
Millis. 1963. 

8. — Brookline. — Thomas P. Kendrick, Brookline, 1967. Associate, 

James A. Hennessey, Brookline, 1963. 



Plymouth County. 
District. 

1. — Brockton, West Bridgewater, East Bridgewater, Bridgewater 

and Wliitman. — Peirce H. Leavitt, Brockton, 1969. Associ- 
ate, Charles F. Kane, Brockton, 1963. 

2. — Abington, Rockland, Hanover, Hanson, Norwell and Pembroke. 

— Raymond G. Vinal, Norwell, 1963. Associate, John C. 
Angley, Pembroke, 1963. 

3. — Plymouth, Halifax, Kingston, Plympton and Duxbury. — 

William C. Gould, Kingston, 1969. Associate, Walter E. 
Deacon, Duxbury, 1969. 

4. — Middleborough, Wareham, Mattapoisett, Carver, Rochester, 

Lakeville and Marion. — Raymond H. Baxter, Marion, 1966. 
Associate, Alfred A. L. Lentini, Lakeville, 1966. 

5. — Hingham, Hull, Scituate and Marshfield. — Frederick F. O'Brien, 

Scituate, 1966. Associate, Wallace M. Kemp, Hingham, 1969. 



Suffolk County. 
District. 
1. — Boston, Chelsea, Revere and Winthrop. — Michael A. Luongo, 
Boston, 1964; Richard Ford, Boston, 1964. Associates, 
George W. Curtis, Boston, 1966; Leonard Atkins, Boston, 
1964. 



Medical Examiners. 365 

Worcester County. 
District. 

1. — Athol, Dana,* Petersham, Phillipston and Royalston. — Fran- 

cis A. Reynolds, Athol, 1965. Associate, Bernard C. Rubino, 
Athol, 1965. 

2. — Gardner, Templeton and Winchendon. — ^ Joseph P. Marnane, 

Gardner, 1967. Associate, T. Roland Ekwall, Gardner, 1968. 

3. — Fitchburg, Ashburnham, Leominster, Lunenburg, Princeton and 

Westminster. — Charles A. Wheeler, Leominster, 1969. Asso- 
ciate, Joseph M. Silver, Fitchburg, 1967. 

4. — Berlin, Bolton, Boylston, Clinton, Harvard, Lancaster and 

Sterling. — George Axelrod, Clinton, 1969. Associate, 
Lawrence F. Burke, Clinton, 1964. 

5. — Grafton, Northborough, Southborough and Westborough. — 

Walter F. Mahoney, Westborough, 1968. Associate, S. Alden 
Guild, Grafton, 1969. 

6. — Hopedale, Mendon, Milford and Upton. — Nicholas J. Capece, 

Milford, 1970. Associate (vacancy). 

7. — Blackstone, Douglas, Millville, Northbridge and Uxbridge. — 

Russell T. Draper, Uxbridge, 1968. Associate, Raymond 
Spooner, Douglas, 1968. 

8. — Charlton, Dudley, Oxford, Southbridge, Sturbridge and Web- 

ster. — Anthony A. Woiciechowski, Webster, 1968. Asso- 
ciate, John T. Nasse, Southbridge, 1960. 

9. — Brookfield, East Brookfield, North Brookfield, Spencer, Warren 

and West Brookfield. — Thomas J. O'Boyle, North Brookfield, 

1965. Associate, Romeo J. Cournoyer, Spencer, 1968. 
10. — Barre, Hubbardston, Hardwick, New Braintree, Oakham and 

Rutland. — Arthur Kanserstein, Barre, 1967. Associate 

(vacancy). 
11. — Worcester, Auburn, Holden, Leicester, Millbury, Paxton, 

Shrewsbury, Sutton and West Boylston. — John C. Ward, 

Worcester, 1966. Associate, Lewis J. Cataldo, Jr., Worcester, 

1968. 



♦Terminated. See Acts of 1927, chapter 321; Acts of 1938, chap- 
ters 240 and 455. 



366 



Judiciary. 





JUDl 

Judges of the Superior Cour 


CIAR 


y. 

icature of the Province of 






t of Jud 






Massachusetts Bay, from 1692 to 1775.* 








CHIEF JUSTICES. 






APPOINTED. LEFT THE BENCH. 




DIED. 


1692. 


William Stoughton, . . 1701. 


Resigned. 




1701. 


1701. 


Wait VVinthrop, . . .1701. 


Resigned. 




1717. 


1702. 


Isaac Addington, . . 1703. 


Resigned. 




1715. 


1708. 


Wait Winthrop, . 


. 1717. 






1717. 


1718. 


Samuel Bewail, 


. 1728. 


Resigned. 




1730. 


1729. 


Benjamin Lynda, 


. 1745. 






1745. 


1745. 


Paul Dudley, 


. 1751. 






1751. 


1752. 


Stephen Sewall, . 


. 1760. 






1760. 


1761. 


Thomas Hutchinson, 


. 1769. 


Resigned. 




1780. 


1769. 


Benjamin Lynde, 


. 1771. 


Resigned. 




1781. 


1772. 


Peter Oliver, 


. 1775. 


Removed at Revolution 


1791. 




JUSTICES. 






1692. 


Thomas Danforth, . . 1699. 






1699 


1692. 


Wait \\ inthrop, . 




1701. 


Resigned. 




1717. 


1692. 


John Richards. 






1694. 






1694. 


1692. 


Samuel Sewall, 






1728. 


(Appointed C. J. 


1718.) 


1730. 


1695. 


Elisha Cooke, 






1702. 


Removed. 




1715. 


1700. 


John Walley, 






1712. 






1712. 


1701. 


John Safifin, . 






1702. 


Removed. 




1710. 


1702. 


John Hathorne, 






1712. 


Resigned. 




1717. 


1702. 


John Leverett, 






1708. 


Resigned. 




1724. 


1708. 


Jonathan Curwin, 




1715. 


Resigned. 




1718. 


1712. 


Benjamin Lynde, 




1745. 


(Appointed C. J. 


1729.) 


1745. 


1712. 


Nathaniel Thomas, 




1718. 


Resigned. 




1718. 


1715. 


Addington Davenport 




1736. 






1736. 


1718. 


Paul Dudley, 




1751. 


(Appointed C. J. 


1745.) 


1751. 


1718. 


Edmund Quincy, 




1737. 






1737. 


1728. 


John Cushing, 




1733. 


Removed. 




1737. 


1733. 


Jonathan Remington, 




1745. 






1745. 


1736. 


Richard Saltonstall, 




1756. 






1756. 


1737. 


Thomas Greaves, 




1738. 


Resigned. 




1747. 



* The judges died in office, except where otherwise stated. See "Sketches 
of the Judicial History of Massachusetts," by Emory Washburn, 1840. 
p. 241. 



Jtidiciary. 



367 



APPOINTED. LEFT 


THE BENCH. 


DIED. 


1739. 


Stephen Sewall, . 


. 1760. 


(Appointed C. J., 1752.) 


1760. 


1745. 


Nathaniel Hubbard, . 


. 1746. 


Resigned. 


1748. 


1745. 


Benjamin Lynde, 


1771. 


(Appointed G. J., 1769.) 


1781. 


1747. 


John Gushing. 


1771. 


Resigned. 


1778. 


1752. 


Chambers Russell, 


. 1766. 




1766. 


1756. 


Peter Oliver, 


1775. 


(Appointed G. J., 1772.) 


1791 


1767. 


Edmund Trowbridge, 


1775. 


Resigned. 


1793. 


1771. 


Foster Hutchinson, 


1775. 


Removed at Revolution. 


1799. 


1772. 


Nathaniel Ropes, 


1774. 




1774. 


1772. 


William Gushing, 


1775. 


Removed at Revolution. 


1810. 


1774. 


William Browne, 


1775. 


Removed at Revolution. 


1802. 



Justices of the Superior Court of Judicature and the Supreme Judicial Court 
of Massachusetts since the Revolution. The latter was established July 3, 
1782. 

GHIEF JUSTIGES. 



APPOINTED. LEFT 


THE BENCH. 


DIED. 


1775. 


John Adams, 


1776. 


Resigned.* 


1826. 


1777. 


William Gushing, 


1789. 


Resigned.! 


1810. 


1790. 


Nathaniel Peaslee Sargent 


, 1791. 




1791. 


1791. 


Francis Dana. 


1806. 


Resigned. 


1811. 


1806. 


Theophilus Parsons. . 


1813. 




1813. 


1814. 


Samuel Sewall, 


1814. 




1814. 


1814. 


Isaac Parker, 


1830. 




1830. 


1830. 


Lemuel Shaw, 


1860. 


Resigned. 


1861. 


1860. 


George Tyler Bigelow, 


1868. 


Resigned. 


1878. 


1868. 


Reuben Atwater Ghapman 


. 1873. 




1873. 


1873. 


Horace Gray, J 


1882. 




1902. 


1882. 


Marcus Morton, . 


1890. 


Resigned. 


1891. 


1890. 


Walbridge Abner Field, 


1899. 




1899 


1899. 


Oliver Wendell Holmes. § 


1902. 




1935. 



• Mr. Adams never took his seat on the bench. 

t Chief Justice Gushing resigned on being appointed one of the Justices 
of the Supreme Court of the United States. 

X Chief Justice Gray vacated his office by accepting an appointment as 
one of the Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States. 

5 Chief Justice Holmes vacated his office by accepting an appointment 
as one of the Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States. 



368 



Judiciary. 



APPOINTED. 

1902. Marcus Perrin Knowlton, 

1911. Arthur Prentice Rugg 

1938. Fred Tarbell Field, 

1947. Stanley Elroy Qua, 

1956. Raymond Sanger Wilkins 



LEFT THE BENCH. 


DIED. 


ton, . 1911. Resigned. 


1918. 


. 1938. 


1938. 


. 1947. Resigned. 


1950. 


. 1956. Resigned. 







JUSTICES. 






1775. 


William Gushing, 


1789. 


(Appointed C. J. 


1777.) 


1810. 


1775. 


Nathaniel Peaslee Sargent, 


1791. 


(Appointed C. J. 


1790.) 


1791. 


1775. 


William Reed, 


1776. 


Superseded. 




1780 


1776. 


Jedediah Foster, . 


1779. 






1779. 


1776. 


James Sullivan, . 


1782. 


Resigned. 




1808. 


1777. 


David Sewall, 


1789. 


Resigned.* 




1825. 


1782. 


Increase Sumner, 


1797. 


Res. to become Gov'r. 


1799. 


1785. 


Francis Dana, 


1806. 


(Appointed C. J. 


1791.) 


1811. 


1790. 


Robert Treat Paine, . 


1804. 


Resigned. 




1814. 


1790. 


Nathan Gushing, 


1800. 


Resigned. 




1812. 


1792. 


Thomas Dawes, . 


1802. 


Resigned. 




1825. 


1797. 


Theophilus Bradbury, 


1803. 


Removed.t 




1803. 


1800. 


Samuel Sewall, . 


1814. 


(Appointed C. J. 


1814.) 


1814. 


1801. 


Simeon Strong. 


1805. 






1805. 


1801. 


George Thacher, . 


1824. 


Resigned. 




1824. 


1802. 


Theodore Sedgwick, . 


1813. 






1813. 


1806. 


Isaac Parker, 


1830. 


(Appointed C. J. 


1814.) 


1830. 


1813. 


Charles Jackson. . 


1823. 


Resigned. 




1855. 


1814. 


Daniel Dewey, 


1815. 






1815. 


1814. 


Samuel Putnam, . 


1842. 


Resigned. 




1853. 


1815. 


Samuel Sumner Wilde, 


1850. 


Resigned. 




1855. 


1824. 


Levi Lincoln, 


1825. 


Res. to become Gov'r. 


1868. 


1825. 


Marcus Morton, . 


1840. 


Res. to become Gov'r. 


1864. 


1837. 


Charles Augustus Dewey, 


1866. 






1866. 


1842. 


Samuel Hubbard, 


1847. 






1847. 


1848. 


Charles Edward Forbes, 


1848. 


Resigned. 




1881. 


1848. 


Theron Metcalf. . 


1865. 


Resigned. 




1875. 


1848. 


Richard Fletcher, 


1853. 


Resigned. 




1869. 


1850. 


George Tyler Bigelow, 


1868. 


(Appointed C. J. 


1860.) 


1878. 



* Mr. Justice Sewall resigned on being appointed Judge of the United 
States District Court for the District of Maine. 

t Mr. Justice Bradbury was removed on account of physical disability. 



Judiciary. 



369 



APPOINTED. LEFT T 

1852. Caleb Gushing, . 

1853. Benj. Franklin Thomas, 
1853. Pliny Merrick, . 

1859. Ebenezer Rockwood Hoar, 

1860. Reuben Atwater Chapman, 

1864. Horace Gray, Jr., 

1865. James Denison Colt, . 

1866. Dwight Foster, . 
1866. John Wells 

1868. James Denison Colt, . 

1869. Seth Ames 

1869. Marcus Morton, . 

1873. Wm.Crowninshield Endicott 

1873. Charles Devens. Jr., . 

1875. Otis Phillips Lord, 

1877. Augustus Lord Soule, 

1881. Walbridge Abner Field, . 

1881. Charles Devens.* 

1881. WiUiam Allen. . 

1882. Charles Allen, 
1882. Waldo Colburn, . 
1882. Oliver Wendell Holmes, . 
1885. William Sewall Gardner, . 
1887. Marcus Perrin Knowlton, . 

1890. James Madison Morton, . 

1891. John Lathrop, 
1891. James Madison Barker, 

1898. John Wilkes Hammond, . 

1899. W^illiam Caleb Loring, 
1902. Henry King Braley. . 

1905. Henry Newton Sheldon, 

1906. Arthur Prentice Rugg, 
1911. Charles Ambrose DeCourcy 

1913. John Crawford Crosby, 

1914. Edward Peter Pierce, 

1915. James Bernard Carroll. 
1919. Charles Francis Jenney, 



HE BENCH. 






DIED. 


1853. 


Resigned. J 






1879. 


1859. 


Resigned. 






1878. 


1864. 


Resigned. 






1867. 


1869. 


Resigned. t 






1895. 


1873. 


(Appointed C. 


J.. 


, 1868.) 


1873. 


1882. 


(Appointed C. 


J. 


, 1873.) 


1902. 


1866. 


Resigned. 






1881. 


1869. 


Resigned. 






1884. 


1875. 








1875. 


1881. 








1881 


1881. 


Resigned. 






1881. 


1890. 


(Appointed C. 


J., 


, 1882.) 


1891 


,1882. 


Resigned. 






1900. 


1877. 


Resigned.* 






1891. 


1882. 


Resigned. 






1884. 


1881. 


Resigned. 






1887. 


1899. 


(Appointed C. 


J. 


, 1890 ) 


1899. 


1891. 








1891. 


1891. 








1891. 


1898. 


Resigned. 






1913. 


1885. 








1885. 


1902. 


(Appointed C. 


J.. 


. 1899.) 


1935. 


1887. 


Resigned. 






1888. 


1911. 


(Appointed C. 


J.. 


1902.) 


1918. 


1913. 


Resigned. 






1923. 


1906. 


Resigned. 






1910. 


1905. 








1905. 


1914. 


Resigned. 






1922. 


1919. 


Resigned. 






1930. 


1929. 








1929. 


1915. 


Resigned. 






1925. 


1938. 


(Appointed C. 


J.< 


, 1911.) 


1938. 


■,1924. 








1924. 


1937. 








1943. 


1937. 








1938. 


1932. 








1932. 


1923. 








1923. 



X Mr. Justice Cushing and Mr. Justice Hoar resigned on being appointed 
to the office of Attorney-General of the United States. 

♦ Mr. Justice Devens resigned on being appointed to the office of At- 
torney-General of the United States, and was reappointed to the Supreme 
Bench in 1881. 



370 



Judiciary, 



APPOINTED. LEFT 


THE BENCH. 




DIED. 


1923. 


William Gushing Wait, 


1934. 






1935. 


1924. 


George Augustus Sanderson 


, 1932. 






1932. 


1929. 


Fred Tarbell Field. . . 


1947. 


(Appointed C. J. 


1938.) 


1950 


1932. 


Charles Henry Donahue. . 


1944. 


Resigned. 




1952. 


1932. 


Henry Tilton Lummus, 


1955. 


Resigned. 




1960. 


1934. 


Stanley Elroy Qua, . 


1956. 


(Appointed C. J. 


1947.) 




1937. 


Arthur Walter Dolan, 


1949. 


Resigned. 




1949. 


1937. 


Louis Sherburne Cox, 


1944. 


Retired, 




1961. 


1938. 


James Joseph Ronan, 


1959. 






1960. 


1944. 


Raymond Sanger Wilkins, 




(Appointed C. J. 


1956.) 




1944. 


John Varnum Spalding. 










1947. 


Harold Putnam Williams, . 


1962. 


Resigned. 






1949. 


Ekiward A. Counihan, Jr., 


1960. 


Retired. 




1961. 


1955. 


Arthur E. Whittemore. 










1956. 


R. Ammi Cutter. 










1960. 


Paul G. Kirk. 










1960. 


Jacob J. Spiegel. 










1962. 


Paul Cashman Reardon. 











Justices of the Court of Common Pleas, from its Establishment in 1820 
until its Abolition in 1859. 



CHIEF JUSTICES. 



APPOINTED. LEFT 


THE BENCH. 




DIED. 


1820. 


Artemas Ward, . 


1839. 


Resigned. 




1847. 


1839. 


John Mason Williams, 


1844. 


Resigned. 




1868. 


1844. 


Daniel Wells, 


1854. 






1854. 


1854. 


Edward Mellen. . 


1859. 






187S. 




JUSTICES. 






1820. 


Solomon Strong, . 


1842. 


Resigned. 




1850. 


1820. 


John Mason Williams, 




(Appointed C. J., 


1839.) 


1868. 


1820. 


Samuel Howe, 


1828. 






1828. 


1828. 


David Cummins, 


1844. 


Resigned. 




1855. 


1839. 


Charles Henry Warren, 


1844. 


Resigned. 




1874. 


1842. 


Charles Allen. 


1844. 


Resigned. 




1869. 


1843. 


Pliny Merrick, . 


1848. 


Resigned. 




1867. 


1844. 


Joshua Holyoke Ward, 


1848. 






1848. 


1844. 


Emory Washburn, 


1847. 


Resigned. 




1877. 


1844. 


Luther Stearns Gushing, . 


1848. 


Resigned. 




1856. 


1845. 


Harrison Gray Otis Colby 


1847. 


Resigned. 




1853. 


1847. 


Charles Edward Forbes, . 


1848. 


App'd to Sup. Jud. C't. 


1881. 


1847. 


Edward Mellen, - 


1859. 


(.\ppointed C. J.. 


1854.) 


1875 



Judiciary. 371 



APPOINTED. LEFT THE BENCH. DIED 

1848. George Tyler Bigelow, . 1850. App'd to Sup. Jud. C't. 1878. 

1848. Jonathan Cogswell Perkins. 1859. 1877. 

1848. Horatio Byington. . . 1856. 1856. 

1848. Thomas Hopkinson, . , 18-19. Resigned. 1856 

1849. Ebenezer Rockwood Hoar, 1855. Resigned. 1895. 

1850. Pliny Merrick, . . . 1853. App'd to Sup. Jud. C't. 1867. 

1851. Henry Walker Bishop. . 1859. 1871. 

1853. George Nixon Briggs. . 1859. 1861. 

1854. George Partridge Sanger. . 1859. 1890. 

1855. Henry Morris, . . . 1859. 1888. 

1856. David Aiken. . . . 1859. 1895. 



Justices of the Superior Court for the County of Suffolk, from its Establishment 
in 1855 until its Abolition in 1859. 

CHIEF JUSTICES. 

APPOINTED. LEFT THE BENCH. DIED. 

1855. Albert Hobart Nelson, . 1857. 1858. 

1858. Charles Allen,* . . . 1859. 1869. 

JUSTICES. 

1855. Josiah Gardner .Abbott. . 1858. 1891. 

1855. Charles Phelps Huntington. 1859. 1868. 

1855. Stephen Gordon Nash. . 1859. 1894. 

1858. Marcus Morton,t . . 1859. 1891. 



Justices of the Superior Court since its Establishment in 1859. 
CHIEF JUSTICES. 



APPOINTED. LEFT 


THE BENCH. 




DIED. 


1859. 


Charles Allen, 


. 1867. 


Resigned. 




1869. 


1867. 


Seth .\nies, . 


. 1869. 


App'd to Sup. 


Jud. C't. 


1881. 


1869. 


Lincoln Flagg Brigham, 


. 1890. 


Resigned. 




1895. 


1890. 


Albert Mason, 


. 1905. 






1905. 


1905. 


John .\dams .Aiken, . • 


. 1922. 


Resigned. 




1927. 


1922. 


Walter Perley Hall, . 


. 1937. 


Resigned. 




1942. 


1937. 


John Patrick Higgins, 


. 1955. 






1955. 


1955. 


Paul Cashman Reardon, 


. 1962. 


App'd to Sup. 


Jud. C't. 




1962. 


G. Joseph Tauro, 











* In 1859 Charles Allen became the first Chief Justice of the Superior 
Court of the Commonwealth. 

t In 1859 Marcus Morton became one of the Associate Justices of the 
Superior Court of the Commonwealth. 



372 



Judiciary. 





JUSTICES. 








APPOINTED. LEFT 


THE BENCH. 






DIED. 


1859. 


Julius Rockwell, . 


1886. 


Resigned. 






1888. 


1859. 


Otis Phillips Lord. 


1875. 


App'd to Sup. Jud. 


C't. 


1884. 


1859. 


Marcus Morton, . 


1869. 


App'd to Sup. 


Jud. 


C't. 


1891. 


1859. 


Seth Ames 


1869. 


(Appointed C 


J., 1867.) 


1881. 


1859. 


Ezra Wilkinson, . 


1882. 








1882. 


1859. 


Henry Vose, 


1869. 








1869. 


1859. 


Thomas Russell. . 


1867. 


Resigned. 






1887. 


1859. 


John Phelps Putnam, 


1882. 








1882. 


1859. 


Lincoln Flagg Brigham. 


1890. 


(Appointed C 


J., 1869.) 


1895. 


1867. 


Chester Isham Reed. . 


1871. 


Resigned. 






1873. 


1867. 


Charles Devens. Jr.. . 


1873. 


App'd to Sup 


Jud 


. C't. 


1891. 


1869. 


Henry Austin Scudder. 


1872. 


Resigned. 






1895. 


1869. 


Francis Henshaw Dewey. 


1881. 


Resigned. 






1887. 


1869. 


Robert Carter Pitman. 


1891. 








1891. 


1871. 


John William Bacon. . 


1888. 








1888. 


1871. 


William Allen, . 


1881. 


App'd to Sup. 


Jud. 


C't. 


1891. 


1873. 


Peleg Emory Aldrich, 


1895. 








1895. 


1875. 


Waldo Colburn. . 


1882. 


App'd to Sup. Jud. 


C't. 


1885. 


1875. 


William Sewall Gardner, . 


1885. 


App'd to Sup 


Jud 


. C't. 


1888. 


1881. 


Hamilton Barclay Staples, 


1891. 








1891. 


1881. 


Marcus Perrin Knowlton, . 


1887. 


App'd to Sup. 


Jud 


C't. 


1918. 


1882. 


Caleb Blodgett. . 


1900. 


Resigned. 






1901. 


1882. 


Albert Mason. 


1905. 


(Appointed C. 


J., 1890.) 


1905. 


1882. 


James Madison Barker, 


1891. 


App'd to Sup. 


Jud 


C't. 


1905. 


1885. 


Charles Perkins Thompson 


1894. 








1894. 


1886. 


John Wilkes Hammond, . 


1898. 


App'd to Sup. 


Jud 


C't. 


1922. 


1886. 


Justin Dewey, 


1900. 








1900. 


1887. 


Edgar Jay Sherman, . 


1911. 


Retired. 






1914. 


1888. 


John Lathrop, 


1891. 


App'd to Sup. 


Jud. 


C't. 


1910. 


1888. 


James Robert Dunbar, 


1898. 


Resigned. 






1915. 


1888. 


Robert Roberts Bishop, 


1909. 


• 






1909. 


1890. 


Daniel Webster Bond, 


1911. 








1911. 


1891. 


Henry King Braley, . 


1902. 


App'd to Sup. 


Jud. 


C't. 


1929. 


1891. 


John Hopkins, 


1902. 








1902. 


1891. 


Elisha Burr Maynard, 


1906. 








1906. 


1891. 


Franklin Goodridge Fessenden, 


1922. 


Resigned. 






1931. 


1892. 


John William Corcoran, 


1893. 


Resigned. 






1904. 


1892. 


James Bailey Richardson, . 


1911. 








1911. 


1893. 


Charles Sumner Lilley, 


1900. 


Resigned. 






1921. 



Judiciary. 



373 



1894. Henry Newton Sheldon. . 1905. 

1895. Francis Almon Gaskill. . 1909. 

1896. John Henry Hardy. . . 1917. 
1896. Henry Wardwell, . . 1898. 
1898. William Burnham Stevens. 1917. 
1898. Charles Upham Bell. . . 1917. 
1898. John Adams Aiken. . . 1922. 
1900. Frederick Lawton, , . 1926. 
1900. Edward Peter Pierce, . 1914. 

1900. Jabez Fox 1921. 

1902. Charles Ambrose DeCourcy, 1911. 

1902. Robert Orr Harris, . . 1911. 

1902. Lemuel LeBaron Holmes, . 1907. 

1902. William Cushing Wait, . 1923. 

1902. William Schofield. . . 1911. 

1903. Lloyd Everett White. , 1921. 
1903. Loranus Eaton Hitchcock, 1920. 
1905. John Crawford Crosby, . 1913. 

1905. John Joseph Flaherty, . 1906. 

1906. William Franklin Dana, . 1920. 

1906. John Freeman Brown, . 1924. 

1907. Henry Amasa King, . . 1923. 
1907. George Augustus Sanderson, . 1924. 
1907. Robert Fulton Raymond, . 1929. 
1909. Marcus Morton, . . . 1939. 
1909. Charles Francis Jenney, . 1919. 
1911. Joseph Francis Quinn, . 1929. 
1911. John Dwyer McLaughlin, . 1931. 
1911. Walter Perley Hall, . . 1937. 
1911. Hugo Adelard Dubuque, . 1928. 
1911. John Bernard Ratigan, . 1915. 
1911. Patrick Michael Keating, . 1935. 
1911. Nathan Dexter Pratt, . 1914. 
1911. Frederic Hathaway Chase, 1920. 
1911. Richard William Irwin, . 1929. 
1914. William Hamilton, .1918. 
1914. Christopher Theodore Callahan, 1929. 

1914. James Bernard Carroll, . 1915. 

1915. James Henry Sisk. . . 1937. 
1915. Philip Joseph O'Connell, . 1931. 
1917. Webster Thayer, . . 1933. 
1917. Charles Edward Shattuck. 1918 



LEFT THE BENXH. 

App'd to Sup. Jud. C't. 



Resigned. 

Resigned. 

Resigned. 

(Appointed C. J., 1905.) 

Resigned. 

App'd to Sup. Jud. C't. 

Retired. 

App'd to Sup. Jud. C't. 

Resigned. 

App'd to Sup. Jud. C't. 

Resigned. 

Resigned. 

App'd to Sup. Jud. C't. 

Resigned. 

Resigned. 

App'd to Sup. Jud. C't. 



App'd to Sup. Jud. C't. 



(Appointed C. J., 1922.) 



Resigned. 
Resigned. 



App'd to Sup. Jud. C't. 
Resigned. 



DIED. 

1925. 
1909. 
1917. 
1922. 
1931. 
1922. 
1927. 
1941. 
1938. 
1923. 
1924. 
1926. 
1907. 
1935. 
1912. 
1921. 
1920. 
1943. 
1906. 
1920. 
1924. 
1932. 
1932. 
1929. 
1939. 
1923. 
1929. 
1931. 
1942. 
1928. 
1915. 
1935. 
1914. 
1948. 
1932. 
1918. 
1929. 
1932. 
1938. 
1931. 
1933. 
1918. 



374 



Judiciary. 



APPOINTED. LEFT THE BENCH. 

1917. Franklin Tweed Hammond. 1940. Resigned 
Nelson Pierce Brown, . 1946. 

Louis Sherburne Cox, . 1937. 

Edward Lyman Shaw. . 1921. 
Fred'k Woodbury Fosdick, 1943. 
Elias Bullard Bishop, . 1934. 

George Aloysi us Flynn, , 1927. 
Henry Tilton Lummus, . 1932. 
WiUiam Adams Burns, . 1949. 
Stanley Elroy Qua, . . 1934. 
Alonzo Rogers Weed, . 1936. 

Frederick Joseph Macleod, 1935. 
Joseph Walsh, . . . 1946. 
Winfred Holt Whiting, . 1937. 
Edward Thomas Broadhurst,1955. 
Fred'c Breadlesome Greeniialge, 1 945 . 



1918. 
1918. 
1919. 
1920. 
1920. 
1920. 
1921. 
1921. 
1921. 
1922. 
1922. 
1922. 
1922. 
1923. 
1923. 
1924. 
1924. 
1925. 
1925. 
1926. 
1926. 
1928. 
1928. 
1929. 
1929. 
1929. 
1929. 
1930. 
1931. 
1931. 
1932. 
1932. 
1933. 
1934. 
1934. 
1935. 
1935. 
1935. 
1937. 
1937. 
1937. 



App'd to Sup. Jud. C't. 
Resigned. 



App'd to Sup. Jud. C't. 

Resigned. 

App'd to Sup. Jud. C't. 



Charles Henry Donahue, 
David Abraham Lourie, 
Franklin Freeman. 
Wilford Drury Gray, . 
David Francis Dillon, 
Harold Putnam Williams 
Walter Leo Collins, . 
Daniel Theodore O'Connell, 1958 
Thomas Jasper Hammond, 1946 
John Mellen Gibbs. . 
Raoul Henri Beaudreau, . 
Edward Francis Hanify, . 
Abraham Edward Pinanski, 
James Corcoran Donnelly, 
John Joseph Burns, 
Frank Joseph Donahue. 
Lewis Goldberg. 
John Edward Swift. 
Vincent Brogna, . 
George Francis Leary, 



1932. 
1930. 
1926. 
1939. 
1948. 
1947. 
1959. 



1937. 
1956. 
1954. 
1949. 
1952. 
1934. 



1960. 

1954. 



Resigned. 

App'd to Sup. Jud. C't. 



App'd to Sup. Jud. C't. 

Resigned. 

Resigned. 



Resigned. 



Resigned. 



Joseph Alphonsus Sheehan, 1942. 
Thomas Henry Dowd, . 1958. 
Joshua Arthur Baker, . 1951. 

Joseph Leo Hurley, . . 1956. 
Francis Joseph Good. . 1958. 

Jesse Whitman Morton. . 1962. 



Resigned. 



Drso. 
1959. 
1946. 
1961. 

1943. 
1934. 
1928. 

1960. 
1951. 

1936. 
1935. 
1946. 
1937. 
1955. 
1954. 
1952. 
1930. 
1926. 
1939. 
1948. 



1946. 
1937. 

1954. 
1949. 
1952. 
1957. 



1960. 
1954. 
1942. 
1958. 
1951. 
1956. 
1958. 
1962. 



Judiciary. 



375 



APPOINTED. 

1937. William Clement Giles. 

1937. Paul Grattan Kirk, . 

1939. Allan Gordon Buttrick. 

1939. Felix Forte. 

1940. Joseph Everett Warner, . 

1942. John Varnum Spalding, 

1943. Charles Codman Cabot, 

1944. John Vincent Sullivan, 

1945. Richard M. Walsh, . 

1946. Eugene A. Hudson. 
1946. Edward J. Voke. 
1946. Frank J. Murray. 

1946. Daniel D. O'Brien. 

1947. Horace Tracy Cahill. 

1947. Frank Edward Smith. 

1948. Charles Fairhurst. 

1949. Charles A. Rome. 
1949. David G. Nagle. . 

1951. John Henry Meagher, 

1952. Wilfred J. Paquet. 
1952. Edward A. Pecce. 
1954. Edmund R. Dewing. 
1954. Rueben L. Lurie. 
1956. Donald M. Macaulay. 
1956. George E. Thompson. 
1956. Francis J. Quirico. 
1956. Charles S. Bolster. 
1958. John M. Noonan. 
1958. Frank W. Tomasello. 
1958, Edward O. Gourdin. 
1958. August C. Taveira. 
1958. John W. Coddaire, Jr. 
1958. Stanley W. Wisnioski, 
1958. James L. Vallely. 

1958. Edward J. DeSaulnier, Jr. 

1958. Robert Sullivan. 

1959. Jennie Loitman Barron. 

1959. Francis John Good. 

1960. Daniel J. O'Connell, Jr., 
1960. David A. Rose. 

1960. Thomas J. Spring. 

1960. Vincent R. Brogna. 



LEFT THE BENCH. 



1956. 
1960. 
1951. 

1958. 
1944. 
1947. 
1962. 
1946. 



Retired. 

App*d to Sup. Jud. C't. 

Retired. 



App'd to Sup. Jud. C't. 
Resigned. 



Retired. 



DIBD. 

1954. 
1958. 



1962. 
1952. 



1959. 
1960. 



1959. 
1960. 



1961. 



1962. Resigned. 



376 Judiciary. 



APPOINTED. LEFT THE BENCH. DIED, 

1961. G. Joseph Tauro. . . 1962. (Appointed C. J.. 1962.) 

1962. Francis L. Lappin. 
1962, Joseph Ford. 

1962. Thomas J. O'Malley. 

1962. Harry Kalus. 

1962. Amedeo V. Sgarzi, 

1962. Robert H. Beaudreau. 

1962. Henry H, Chmielinski, Jr. 

1963, Cornelius J, Moynihan. 



Judges of the Land Court since its Establsihment in 1898 as the Court of 
Registration. 





JUDGES, 




APPOIl 


>ITED. LEFT 


THE BENCH, 


DIED. 


1898. 


Leonard A. Jones, 


1909. Resigned. 


1909. 


1909. 


Charles Thornton Davis, 


1936. 


1936. 


1936. 


Michael A. Sullivan, , 


1937. 


1937. 


1937, 


John E. Fenton. 








ASSOCIATE JUDGES, 




APPOINTED. LEFT 


THE BENCH. 


DIED. 


1898. 


Charles Thornton Davis, 


1936. (App'd Judge, 1909.) 


1936, 


1909. 


Louis M. Clark. . 


1914, 


1914. 


1914. 


Joseph J. Corbett. 


1937, Resigned, 


1949 


1924. 


Clarence C. Smith. 


1943. 


1943 


1937, 


Patrick J. Courtney, , 


1952. Retired, 




1943. 


Joseph R. Cotton, 






1952. 


Edward McPartlin. 







Judiciary. 377 



PRESENT ORGANIZATION OF THE COURTS. 

[Corrected to May 23, 1963.] 



[All judges in the Commonwealth are appointed by the Governor 
with the advice and consent of the Council, and hold office during good 
behavior.] 



SUPREME JUDICIAL COURT. 

[General Laws, Chapter 211.] 

Raymond Sanger Wilkins of Annisquam, Chief Justice. 



Justices. 



John Varnum Spalding of Newlon 

Highlands. 
Arthur E. Whittemore of Hing- 

ham. 
R. Ammi Cutter of Cambridge. 



Paul G. Kirk of Newton. 
Jacob J. Spiegel of Newton. 
Paul Cashman Reardon 
Quincy. 



Richard A. McLaughlin of Gloucester, 1967, Clerk for the Common' 
wealth. Room 1412, Suffolk County Court House. 

Frederick J. Quinlan of Boston, Assistant Clerk for the Commonwealth, 
Room 1412, Court House. 

Chester A. Dolan, Jr., of Boston, 1964, Clerk for the County of Suffolk. 
Room 1402, Court House. 

Leo A. Reed of Boston, Assistant Clerk for the County of Suffolk. Room 
1402, Suffolk County Court House. 

Daniel D. Donnelly of Boston, Second Assistant Clerk for the County 
of Suffolk. Room 1402, Court House. 

Grant M. Palmer, Jr., of Weston, Reporter of Decisions. Room 1407, 
Court House. 

Joseph K. Collins of Norwell, Executive Secretary to the Justices of the 
Supreme Judicial Court. Room 301, Suffolk County Court House. 

Edward L. Winn of Boston, Messenger of the Court. 



378 



Judiciary. 



SUPERIOR COURT. 

[General Laws. Chapter 212.] 

G. Joseph Tauro of Swampscott, Chief Justice. 



Justices. 



Frank Joseph Donahue of Boston. 

Le\vis Goldberg of Brookline. 

John Edward Swift of Milford. 

Felix Forte of Somerville. 

Eugene Albert Hudson of Brook- 
line. 

Edward John Voke of Chelsea. 

Frank Jerome Murray of West 
Roxbury. 

Daniel Doyle O'Brien of North- 
ampton. 

Horace Tracy Cahill of Braintree. 

Frank Edward Smith of Taunton. 

Charles Fairhurst of Boston. 

John Henry Meagher of Worces- 
ter. 

Wilfred J. Paquet of Watertown. 

Edward A. Pecce of Boston. 

Edmund R. Dewing of Wellesley. 

Reuben L. Lurie of Brookline. 

Donald M. Macaulay of Long- 
meadow. 

George E. Thompson of Melrose. 

Francis J. Quirico of Pittsfield. 

Charles S. Bolster of Cambridge. 

John M. Noonan of Springfield. 

Frank W. Tomasello of Belmont. 



Edward O. Gourdin of Quincy. 

August C. Taveira of New Bed- 
ford. 

John W. Coddaire, Jr., of Haver- 
hill. 

James L. Vallely of Newton. 

Edward J. DeSaulnier, Jr., of 
Chelmsford. 

Robert Sullivan of Brookline. 

Jennie Loitman Barron of Brook- 
line. 

Francis John Good of Cambridge. 

David A. Rose of Newton. 

Thomas J. Spring of Boston. 

Vincent R. Brogna of Boston. 

Francis L. Lappin of Dracut. 

Joseph Ford of Quincy. 

Thomas J. O'Malley of Spring- 
field. 

Harry Kalus of Brookline. 

Amedeo V. Sgarzi of Plymouth. 

Robert H. Beaudreau of Marl- 
borough. 

Henry H. Chmielinski, Jr. of 
W^eymouth. 

Cornelius J. Moynihan of 
Newton. 



Thomas Dorgan of Boston, 1964, Clerk for Civil Business for the County 
of Suffolk. Room 117, Suffolk County Courthouse. 

Edward V. Keating of Boston, 1962, Clerk for Criminal Business for 
the County of Suffolk. Room 712, Courthouse. 



Edward J. Kelley of Boston, Executive Clerk to the Chief Justice. 
1112, Courthouse, Boston. 



Room 



James A. Gleason of Boston, Messenger of the Court. 
Courthouse, Boston. 



Room 1103, 



Judiciary, 379 



PROBATE COURTS AND COURTS OF INSOLVENCY. 
[General Laws, Chapters 215-217.] 

There is a Probate Court and a Court of Insolvency in each 
county, distinct in their jurisdiction, powers, proceedings and practice, 
but having the same judge and register. These courts are held by the 
judge of probate and insolvency appointed for the county; but the 
judges of the several counties may, in cases of necessity or convenience, 
interchange services and perform each other's duties. 

The names of the judges, registers and assistant registers may be 
found among the list of County Officers beginning on page 347. 

Administrative Committee for the District Courts. 
[General Laws, Chapter 218, § 43A, as amended by Acts of 1943, 
Chapter 101, Acts of 1956, 738, § 4.] 
Frank L. Riley of the Central District Court of Worcester, 1964; 
Kenneth L. Nash of the District Court of East Norfolk. 1964; Daniel W. 
Casey of the Municipal Court of the West Roxbury District. 1964; Ernest 
E. Hobson of the District Court of Eastern Hampden, 1964; Arthur L. 
Eno of the District Court of Lowell, 1964. 

Administrative Committee for the Probate Coxjrts. 
IGeneral Laws, Chapter 215, § 30A, as amended by Acts of 1931, 
Chapter 404.] 
Carl E. Wahlstrom (Chairman), Worcester, 1963; Abraham I. 
Smith, Springfield, 1964; William J. Hickey, Jr., Brookline, 1965. 



APPELLATE DIVISIONS OF DISTRICT COURTS. 
[General Laws, Chapter 231, § 108.] 

Said division of the Municipal Court of the City of Boston shall 
consist of three justices thereof to be designated from time to time by 
the Chief Justice thereof. 

Five justices to be designated by the Chief Justice of the Supreme 
Judicial Court in the following districts: — 

Northern Appellate Division District. — Lawrence G. Brooks, Med- 
ford, 1964; Arthur L. Eno, Lowell, 1964; A. Vincent Kelleher, New- 
buryport, 1963. 

Southern Appellate Division District. — Kenneth L. Nash, Wey- 
mouth. 1963; Gilbert W. Cox, Needham, 1965; Edward .\. Lee, Attle- 
boro, 1965; Gordon M. Owen, Taunton, 1963; Henry L. Murphy, 
Barnstable, 1964. 



c A \^^f Tu^«t c. , Of i-r-j^ icf Co ^ mrts, - 



380 Judiciary. 



A- 



^^ 



Western Appellate Division District. — Arthur T. Garvey, Westfield 
1964; Ernest E. Hobson, Palmer, 1965; M. Alan Moore, Gardner, 
1964; Samuel E. Levine, North Adams, 1965; Walter D. Allen, 
Worcester, 1963. 

LAND COURT. 

[General Laws, Chapter 185.] 

Judge, John E. Fenton of Lawrence. Associate Judges, Joseph R. 

Cotton of Lexington; Edward McPartlin, Winchester. Recorder, 

Margaret M. Daly of Boston. Room 408, Suffolk County Courthouse. 

BOSTON JUVENILE COURT. 
[General Laws, Chapter 218, §§ 57-60.] 
Justice, John J. Connelly. Special Justices, G. Bruce Robinson, 
George Cashman. Clerk, John H. Louden. Rooms 165-168, Suffolk 
County Courthouse. 

JUDICIAL COUNCIL. 
[General Laws, Chapter 221, §§ 34A-34C.] 
Reuben L. Lurie, Brookline (representing the Superior Court); 
Frederic J. Muldoon (Chairman), Westwood, 1964; Stanley E. Qua, 
Lowell (former justice of the Supreme Judicial Court) ; John E. Fenton, 
Lawrence (judge of the Land Court); Elijah Adlow (chief justice of 
the Municipal Court of the City of Boston); Carl E. Wahlstrom, 
Worcester (representing the probate courts), 1964; Kenneth L. Nash, 
Weymouth (representing the district courts), 1964; Livingston Hall, 
Concord, 1963; Raymond F. Barrett, Milton, 1965; Charles W. Bart- 
lett, Dedham, 1966. Secretary, Frank W. Grinnell, 60 State Street, 
Boston. 

DISTRICT AND MUNICIPAL COURTS. 
[General Laws, Chapter 218.] 
*Full time. 

**Effective July 1, 1957. The justices of said courts shall devote their 
entire time during ordinary business hours to their duties and shall not, 
directly or indirectly, engage in the practice of law. (1956, 738.) 
*** Effective January 1. 1957. The justices of said courts shall devote 
their entire time during ordinary business hours to their duties and 
shall not, directly or indirectly, engage in the practice of law. 
****EfTective January 1, 1960. The justices of said courts shall devote 
their entire time during ordinary business hours to their duties and shall 
not, directly or indirectly, engage in the practice of law. 



Judiciary. 381 

***** Effect ive November 20, 1960. The justice of said court shall de- 
vote his entire time during ordinary business hours to his duty and shall 
not, directly or indirectly, engage in the practice of law. 
******Effective January 1, 1961. The justices of said courts shall de- 
vote their entire time during ordinary business hours to their duties 
and shall not, directly or indirectly, engage in the practice of law. 
*******Efifective June 18, 1961. The justice of said court shall devote 
his entire time during ordinary business hours to his duty and shall not, 
directly or indirectly, engage in the practice of law. 
********Effective July 1, 1961. The justice of said court shall devote 
his entire time during ordinary business hours to his duty and shall 
not, directly or indirectly, engage in the practice of law. 

The judicial districts of the several district and municipal courts are 
as follows: 

Barnst.-vble. 

**The first district court of Barnstable, held at Barnstable and Fal- 
mouth; Barnstable, Bourne, Yarmouth, Sandwich, Falmouth and 
Mashpee. — Justice, Henry L, Murphy. Special Justice, Frank Kopel- 
man. Clerk, Charles C. Dalton. 

The second district court of Barnstable, held at Harwich and Prov- 
incetown; Provincetown, Truro, Wellfleet, Eastham, Orleans, Brewster, 
Chatham, Harwich and Dennis. — Justice, Robert A. Welsh. Special 
Justice, Gershom D. Hall. Clerk, John R. Agna. 

Berkshire. 

**The district court of central Berkshire, held at Pittsfield; Pitts- 
field, Hancock, Lanesborough, Peru, Hinsdale, Dalton, Washington, 
Richmond, Lenox, Becket and Windsor; the district court of Lee exer- 
cising concurrent jurisdiction in Lenox and Becket and the fourth dis- 
trict court of Berkshire exercising concurrent jurisdiction in Windsor. 
— Justice, Frank W. Cimini. Special Justice, Federick M. Myers. 
Clerk, Edmund F. McBride. 

The district court of northern Berkshire, held at North Adams; 
North Adams, Clarksburg and Florida. — Justice, Ernest H. Rosasco. 
Special Justice, Benjamin Apkin. Clerk, Morton Freedman. 

The district court of southern Berkshire, held at Great Barrington; 
Sheffield, Great Barrington, Egremont, Alford, Mount Washington, 
Monterey, New Marlborough, West Stockbridge and Sandisfield; the 
district court of Lee exercising concurrent jurisdiction in Sandisfield. — 
Justice, George R. McCormick. Special Justice, Michael W. Albano. 
Clerk, James R. Dohoney. 



382 Judiciary. 

The fourth district court of Berkshire, held at Adams; Adams, 
Cheshire, Savoy and Windsor; the district court of central Berkshire 
exercising concurrent jurisdiction in Windsor. — Justice, John A. 
Barry. Special Justice, Henry W. Kaliss. Clerk, Leonard A. Turgeon. 

The district court of Lee, held at Lee; Lee, Stockbridge, Tyringham, 
Otis, Sandisfield, Lenox and Becket; the district court of southern 
Berkshire exercising concurrent jurisdiction in Sandisfield and the 
district court of central Berkshire exercising concurrent jurisdiction in 
Lenox and Becket. — Justice, John J. Dwyer. Special Justice, James 
E. Hannon. Clerk, Franklyn Sturgis. 

The district court of Williamstown, held at Williamstown; Williams- 
town and New Ashford. — Justice, Samuel E. Levine. Special Justice, 
Nyman H. Kolodny. Clerk, Frank A. Agostini. 

Bristol. 

**The first district court of Bristol, held at Taunton; Taunton, 
Rehoboth, Berkley, Dighton, Seekonk, Easton and Raynham. — Jus- 
tice, Gordon M. Owen. Special Justice, Roger B. Champagne. Clerk, 
William J. Hansen. 

**The second district court of Bristol, held at Fall River; Fall River, 
Somerset, Swansea, Freetown and Westport; the third district court 
of Bristol exercising concurrent jurisdiction in Freetown and West- 
port. — Justice, George F. Driscoll. Special Justice, William A. 
Torphy. Clerk, Thomas E. Kitchen. 

**The third district court of Bristol, held at New Bedford; New 
Bedford, Fairhaven, Acushnet, Dartmouth, Freetown and Westport; 
the second district court of Bristol exercising concurrent jurisdiction 
in Freetown and Westport. — Justice, Ernest C. Horrocks, Jr. Special 
Justice, Samuel Barnet. Clerk, H. Ernest Dionne. 

**The fourth district court of Bristol, held at Attleboro; Attleboro, 
North Attleborough, Mansfield and Norton. — Justice, Edward A. 
Lee. Special Justice, Philip Athanas. Clerk, James H. Sullivan. 

Dukes County. 
The district court of Dukes County, held at Oak Bluffs, Edgartown 
and Tisbury; Dukes County. — Justice, James A. Boyle. Special 
Justice, Philip M. Boudreau. Clerk, John B. Nichols. 

Essex. 
**T he first district court of Essex, held at Salem; Salem, Beverly, 
Danvers, Hamilton, Middleton, Topsfield, Wenham and Manchester. 
— Ju slice, Joseph B. Harrington, Special Justice, Philip J. Durkin. 
Clerk , Leo H. Tracy. 



Judiciary. 383 

The second district court of Essex, held at Amesbury; Amesbury, 
Merrimac and Salisbury; the district court of Newburyport exercis- 
ing concurrent jurisdiction in Salisbury. — Justice, Salvatore Faraci. 
Special Justice, F. Leslie Viccaro. Clerk, Branny J. Gebala. 

The third district court of Essex, held at Ipswich; Ipswich. — Justice, 
Thomas A. Johnson. Special Justice, Richard K. Gordon. Clerk, 
Arthur K. Ross, Jr. 

**The central district court of northern Essex, held at Haverhill; 
Haverhill, Groveland, Georgetown, Boxford and West Newbury; the 
district court of Newburyport exercising concurrent jurisdiction in 
West Newbury. — Justice, A-rthur A. Thomson. Special Justice, 
Augustine D. Riley. Clerk, Harvey A. Pothier. 

The district court of eastern Essex, held at Gloucester; Gloucester, 
Rockport and Essex. — Justice, Edward Morley. Special Justice, 
John C. Pappas. Clerk, Harold L. Armstrong. 

**The district court of southern Essex, held at Lynn; Lynn, Swamp- 
scott, Saugus, Marblehead and Nahant. — Justice, William J. Lan- 
dergan. Special Justice, Israel Cherry. Clerk, Joseph Cole. 

**The district court of Lawrence, held at Lawrence and Methuen; 
Lawrence, Andover, North Andover and Methuen. — Justice, John J. 
Darcy. Special Justice, William H. Daly. Clerk, Walter A. Griffin. 

The district court of Newburyport, held at Newburyport; Newbury- 
port, Newbury, Rowley, Salisbury and West Newbury; the second 
district court of E^sex exercising concurrent jurisTliction in Salisbury 
and the central district court of northern Essex exercising concurrent 
jurisdiction in West Newbury. — Justice, A. Vincent Kelleher. Special 
Justice, Norman Espovich. Clerk, T. Francis Kelleher. 

**The district court of Peabody, held at Peabody; Peabody and 
Lynnfield. — Justice, Henry F. Duggan. Special Justice, John E. 
Murphy. Clerk, Leo F. McGrath. 

Franklin. 

The district court of Franklin, held at Greenfield, and at Turners 
Falls in Montague; Franklin county, except Orange, Erving, Warwick, 
Wendell and New Salem. Sessions may also be held at Shelburne Falls 
in Shelburne and Buckland at such times and places as the justice of 
said court may determine. — Justice, Samuel Blassberg. Special 
Justice, Sidney M. Cooley. Clerk, John B. Touher. 

The district court of eastern Franklin, held at Orange; Orange, 
Erving, Warwick, Wendell and New Salem. — • Justice, C. Edward 
Rowe. Special Justice, William Garbose. Clerk, James R. Kimball. 



384 Judiciary. 



Hampden. 

The district court of eastern Hampden, held at Palmer; Palmer, 
Brimfield, Monson, Holland, Wales and Wilbraham. — Justice, Ernest 
E. Hobson. Special Justices, Joseph A. Furey, Norman L. Snow. 
Clerk, James W. Duffy. 

**The district court of western Hampden, held at Westfield and Ches- 
ter; Westfield, Chester, Granville, Southwick, Russell, Blandford, 
Tolland and Montgomery. — Justice, Arthur T. Garvey. Special 
Justice, Andrew Anderson. Clerk, Otto F. Burkhardt. 

The district court of Chicopee, held at Chicopee; Chicopee. — Jus- 
tice, James J. Landers. Special Justice, Herman Ritter. Clerk, John 
P. Zaremba. 

*******The district court of Holyoke, held at Holyoke; Holyoke. — 
Justice, Michael J. Donohue. Special Justice, George N. Beauregard. 
Clerk, Annette C. Grandchamp. 

♦The district court of Springfield, held at Springfield; Springfield, 
West Springfield, Agawam, Longmeadow, East Longmeadow, Hamj)- 
den and Ludlow. — Justices, Charles D. Sloan, Donald A. Clancy. 
Special Jtistices, Harry M. Ehrlich, Edward J. Dobiecki. Clerk, Edward 
T. Collins. 

Hampshire. 

**The district court of Hampshire, held at Northampton, Amherst, 
Cummington, Belchertown, South Hadley, Huntington and Easthamp- 
ton; Hampshire county, except Ware. — Justice, Charles J. O'Connor. 
Special Justice, Luke F. Ryan. Clerk, Charles J. Kulikowski. 

The district court of eastern Hampshire, held at Ware; Ware. — 
Justice, Thomas L. Goggin. Special Justice, John T. Storrs. Clerk, 
Neill W. Schoonmaker. 

Middlesex. 

**The district court of central Middlesex, held at Concord; Concord, 
Acton, Bedford, Carlisle, Lincoln, Maynard, Stow and Lexington. — 
Justice, Otis M. Whitney. Special Justice, Maurice McWalter. Clerk, 
Robert S. F. Rhodes. 

**The first district court of northern Middlesex, held at Ayer; Ayer, 
Groton, Pepperell, Townsend, Ashby, Shirley, Westford, Littleton and 
Boxborough. — Justice, Lyman K. Clark. Special Justice, David B. 
Williams. Clerk, Mae D. Collicutt. 

*The first district court of eastern Middlesex, held at Maiden; Mai- 
den, Wakefield, Melrose, Everett and Medford. — Justice, Lawrence 
G. Brooks. Special Justice, Louis H. Glaser. Clerk, Michael F. 
Skerry. 



Judiciary. 385 

**The second district court of eastern Middlesex, held at Waltham; 
Waltham, Watertown and Weston. — Justice, Paul K. Connolly. 
Special Justice, Frederic A. Crafts. Clerk, John C. Wroe. 

♦The third district court of eastern Middlesex, held at Cambridge; 
Cambridge. Arlington and Belmont. — Justices, Haven Parker, 
M. Edward Viola. Special Justices, Harold E. Magnuson, Harry M. 
Lack. Clerk, Joseph D. Conway. 

The fourth district court of eastern Middlesex, held at Woburn; 
Woburn, Winchester, Burlington, Wilmington, Stoneham, Reading 
and North Reading. — Justice, William H. Henchey. Special Justice, 
Alfred A. Sartorelli. Clerk, Charles H. Loring. 

**The first district court of southern Middlesex, held at Framingham; 
Framingham, Ashland, Holliston, Sherborn, Sudbury, Wayland and 
Hopkinton. — Justice, Louis W. Farley. Special Justice, Arthur M. 
Mason. Clerk, John J, Brady. 

**The district court of Lowell, held at Lowell; Lowell, Tewksbury, 
Billerica, Dracut, Chelmsford, Dunstable and Tyngsborough. — Jus- 
tice, Arthur L. Eno. Special Justice, John H. V^alentine. Clerk, 
Joseph A. Donohoe. 

******The district court of Marlborough, held at Marlborough; 
Marlborough and Hudson. — Justice. George E. Dewey. Special Jus- 
tice, Edward T. Simoneau. Clerk, John F. Gabriel. 

The district court of Natick, held at Natick; Natick. — Justice, 
H. Edward Snow. Special Justice, Thomas F. Quinn. Clerk, Norman 
S. Trippe. 

****The district court of Newton, held at Newton; Newton. — 
Justice, Donald E. Mayberry. Special Justice, W. Lloyd Allen. Clerk, 
Edward J. Cronin. 

**The district court of Somerville, held at Somerville; Somerville. — 
Justice, Michael DeMarco. Special Justice, Philip Sherman. Clerk, 
David B. Nissenbaum. 

Nantucket. 
The district court of Nantucket, held at Nantucket; Nantucket 
county. — Justice, Caroline Leveen. Special Justice, Gardner W. 
Russell. Clerk, Grace M. Klingelfuss. 



386 Judiciary. 



Norfolk. 
**The district court of northern Norfolk, held at Dedham; Dedham, 
Dover, Norwood, Westwood, Medfield, Needham and Wellesley. — 
Justice, Gilbert W. Cox. Special Justice, Edmund M. Murray. Clerk, 
Andrew G. Geishecker. 

♦The district court of East Norfolk, held at Quincy; Quincy, Ran- 
dolph, Braintree, Cohasset, Weymouth, Holbrook and Milton; and, in 
criminal cases, concurrently with the second district court of Plymouth, 
that part of Scituate described in chapter three hundred and ninety- 
four of the acts of nineteen hundred and twelve. Arrests and service of 
process in such cases may be made by an officer qualified to serve 
criminal process in Cohasset. — Justice, Kenneth L. Nash. Special 
Justices, James A. Mulhall, Gertrude R. Halloran. Clerk, Dennis F. 
Ryan. 

The district court of southern Norfolk, held at Stoughton and Can- 
ton; Stoughton. Canton, Avon and Sharon. — Justice, Frederick T. 
Iddings. Special Justice, Gregory W. Grover. Clerk, Albert A. Ward. 

**The district court of western Norfolk, held at Wrentham; Franklin, 
Walpole, Bellingham, Foxborough, Medway, Millis, Norfolk, Wren- 
tham and Plainville. — Justice, Herbert D. Robinson. Special Justice, 
Ely H. Chayet. Clerk, Richard H. Kannally. 

**The municipal court of Brookline, held at Brookline; Brookline. — 
Justice, Martin Colten. Special Justice, Henry P. Crowley. Clerk, 
Edward R. Fahey. 

Plymouth. 
****The second district court of Plymouth, held at Abington and 
Hingham; Abington, Hingham, Whitman, Rockland, Hull, Hanover, 
Scituate, Norwell and Hanson. — Justice, Alvin C. Tamkin. Special 
Justice, Martha Ware. Clerk, Isadore L. Rosenblum. ^ 

The third district court of Plymouth, held at Plymouth; Plymouth, 
Kingston, Plympton, Pembroke, Duxbury and Marshfield. — Justice, 
George A. Whit'^ Special Justice, Hugh R. Maraghy. Clerk, Clara 
A. Union. 

The fourth district court of Plymouth, held at Middleborough and 
Wareham; Middleborough, Wareham, Lakeville, Marion, Matta- 
poisett, Rochester and Carver. — Justice, James J. Bento. Special 
Justice, James M. Langan. Clerk, Robert D. Kiernan. 



Judiciary. 387 

**The district court of Brockton, held at Brockton; Brockton, 
Bridgewater, East Bridgewater, Halifax and West Bridgewater. — 
Justice, Anthony Kupka. Special Justice, Ermon L. Markella. Clerk, 
George N. Covett. 

Suffolk. 
***The municipal court of the city of Boston, held at Boston; wards 
six, seven, eight, nine, ten, eleven, twelve, sixteen, seventeen and eight- 
een of Boston as they existed on February first, eighteen hundred and 
eighty-two; and in criminal cases, concurrently with the municipal 
courts of the Roxbury and Brighton districts, the second and third 
district courts of eastern Middlesex, and the district court of Newton, 
respectively, so much of the Charles river basin, as defined in section 
two of chapter five hundred and twenty-four of the acts of nineteen 
hundred and nine, as affected by chapter two hundred and forty-five 
of the General Acts of nineteen hundred and sixteen, as is within the 
districts of said courts. — Chief Justice, Elijah Adlow. Associate 
Justices, Daniel J. Gillen, Joseph Riley, Jacob Lewiton, George W. 
Roberts, EHas F, Shamon, Francis X. Morrissey, Theodore A. Glynn, 
Jr., Harold Wilson Canavan. Special Justices, Leo P. Doherty, Vin- 
cent Mottola, Thomas W. Hoag, Charles Francis Mahoney, Matthew 
Brown, Joseph Gorrasi. 

Clerk for Civil Business, John E. Hurley. First Assistant, Joseph L. 
Pierce. Assistants, WiUiam F. Blakeman, George A. Rochford, John 
S. Feeney, Ralph Pullo, Jr., Frank J. Fitzwilliam, George D. SulHvan, 
Timothy J. Hurley, PhiHp M. McDavitt, Mary Sullivan, Joseph A. 
Woods, Peter J. Rogers. Room 374, Old Suffolk County Courthouse. 

Clerk for Criminal Business, Daniel J. Lynch. First Assistant, 
Paul W. Carey. Assistants, James F. Hardy, George W. Herman, 
Theodore J. Stavredes, James F. Monahan, Robert E. McDonough, 
John M. Coyne, James E. Clark, Robert E. Black. Suffolk County 
Courthouse. 

**The municipal court of the Brighton district held at Brighton in 
Boston; ward twenty-five of Boston as it existed on February first, 
eighteen hundred and eighty-two. — Justice, Charles J. Artesani. 
Special Justice, John J. Sullivan. Clerk, Mary C. Daly. 

♦♦The municipal court of the Charlestown district, held at Charles- 
town in Boston; wards three, four and five of Boston as they existed on 
February first, eighteen hundred and eighty-two. — Justice, Frank J. 
Cavanagh. Special Justice, James J. Melleii. Clerk, Jeremiah F. 
Brennan. 



388 Judiciary. 



**The district court of Chelsea, held at Chelsea; Chelsea and Revere. 
— Justice, John W. MacLeod. Special Justice, Frank D. Crowley. 
Clerk, Stephen J. White. 

**The municipal court of the Dorchester district, held at Dorchester 
in Boston; ward twenty-four of Boston as it existed on February 
first, eighteen liundred and eighty-two. — Justice, Jerome P. Troy. 
Special Justices, Sadie Lipner Shulman. Clerk, John P. Holland. 

**The East Boston district court, held at East Boston in Boston; 
Winthrop and wards one and two of Boston as they existed on March 
first, eighteen hundred and eighty-six. — Justice, Augustus B. Loschi. 
Special Justice, Thomas E. Key. Clerk, John Liggotti. 

*The municipal court of the Roxbury district, held at Roxbury in 
Boston; wards nineteen, twenty, twenty-one and twenty-two of Bos- 
ton as they existed on February first, eighteen hundred and eighty- 
two. — Justices, Charles I. Taylor, Elwood S. McKenney. Special Jus- 
tices, Samuel Eisenstadt, Philip A. Tracy. Clerk, John F. Aspell. 

**The municipal court of the South Boston district, held at South 
Boston in Boston; wards thirteen, fourteen and fifteen of Boston as 
they existed on February first, eighteen hundred and eighty-two. — 
Justice, Thomas E. Linehan. Special Justice, Joseph F. Feeney. Clerk, 
John E. Flaherty. 

**The municipal court of the West Roxbury district, held at West 
Roxbury in Boston; ward twenty-three of Boston as it existed on 
February first, eighteen hundred and eighty-two, and the territory 
comprised within the limits of the former town of Hj^de Park which 
was annexed to Boston by chapters four hundred and sixty-nine and five 
hundred and eighty-three of the acts of nineteen hundred and eleven. 
— Justice, Daniel W. Casey. Special Justices, Frank S. Deland, 
Andrew J. Macdonnell. Clerk, Vincent A. Mannering. 



Worcester. 
*The central district court of Worcester, held at Worcester; Worces- 
ter, Millbury, Sutton, Auburn, Leicester, Paxton, West Boylston, 
Holden, Shrewsbury, Rutland, Barre, Princeton and Oakham. — 
Justices, Frank L, Riley, Walter D. Allen. Special Justices, Joseph 
Goldberg, Lucian A. Manzi. Clerk, Wesley E. Mellquist. 

**The first district court of northern Worcester, held at Gardner and 
Athol; Athol, Gardner. Petersham, Phillipston, Royalston, Temple- 



Judiciary. 389 



ton, Hubbardston and Westminster. — Justice, M. Alan Moore. 
Special Justice, A. William Plotkin. Clerk, Thomas J. Carroll. 

The first district court of eastern Worcester, held at Westborough 
and Grafton; Westborough, Grafton, Southborough and Northborough. 
— Justice, William L. Alacintosh. Special Justice, Baron H. Crowell. 
Jr. Clerk, Christopher J. Tyrrell. 



"♦The second district court of eastern Worcester, held at Clin- 
ton; Clinton, Berlin, Bolton, Boylston, Harvard. Lancaster and Ster- 
ling. — Justice, William P. Constantino. Special Justice, Morris N. 
Gould. Clerk, Walter E. Stuka. 

********Tiae first district court of southern Worcester, held at South- 
bridge and Webster; Southbridge, Webster, Sturbridge, Charlton, 
Dudley and O.xford. — Justice, J. Arthur Barnes, Jr. Special Justice, 
Charles S. Murphy. Clerk, Wilfred P. Bazinet. 

*****The second district court of southern Worcester, held at Black- 
stone and Uxbridge, and at Northbridge in that part thereof called 
Whitinsville; Blackstone, Uxbridge, Douglas, Northbridge and Mill- 
ville. — Justice, Edwin F. McCooey. Special Justice, Maurice E, 
Fitzgerald. Clerk, Wesley C. Webster. 

******The third district court of southern Worcester, held at Mil- 
ford; Milford, Mendon, Upton and Hopedale. — Justice, William P. 
DiVitto. Special Justice, Gordon A. Shaw. Clerk, William A. Murray, 
Jr. 

The district court of western Worcester, held at East Brookfield; 
East Brookfield. Brookfield. Spencer, North Brookfield, West Brook- 
field, Warren, Hardwick and New Braintree. Said court may adjourn 
to any town within its district other than East Brookfield whenever 
the public convenience seems to the presiding justice to render such 
adjournment expedient. — Justice, Howard C. Boulton. Special 
Justice, Walter J. Moossa. Clerk, Florence R. Boulton. 

**The district court of Fitchburg, held at Fitchburg; Fitchburg, 
Ashburnham and Lunenburg. — Justice, Everett H. Dudley. Special 
Justice (vacancy). Clerk, Paul F. San Clemente. 

The district court of Leominster, held at Leominster; Leominster. — 
Justice, Richard Comerford. Special Justice, Charles D. Bent. Clerk, 
William P. Silvia. 

The district court of Winchendon, held at Winchendon; Winchendon, 
— Justice, Arthur F. Evans. Special Jusiices, Harry C. Hayes, Harry 
D. Penan. Clerk, Clayton V. Waite. 



390 Judiciary. 



DISTRICT ATTORNEYS. 

[Elected by the several Districts for the term of four years, ending 

January, 1967.] 

Northern District (Middlesex County). — John J. Droney, Cam- 
bridge. Assistant District Attorney, Francis K. Monarski, Lowell. 
Assistant District Attorneys, Ruth I. Abrams, Newton; Aaron K. 
Bikofsky, Framingham; Michael J. Clouse, Jr., Framingham; Dante 
J. DeMichaels, Medford; Francis M. Dorn, Natick; Marvin H. Glaser, 
Arlington; John J. Irwin, Jr., Medford; Richard S. Kelley, Somer- 
ville; Francis B. McNamara, Jr., Lexington; James F. Waldron, Wal- 
tham. Special Assistant District Attorneys, William C. Geary, Lowell; 
Joseph J. Sasso, Jr., Everett. Indictment Clerk, Joseph D. Neylon, 
Somerville. 

Eastern District (Essex County). — John P. S. Burke, Lawrence. 
Assistants, John J. Jennings, Salem; Stanley A. McDonald, Gloucester; 
Howard J. Camuso, Methuen; Peter F. Brady, Lynnfield; Jason C. 
Primack, Haverhill; John N. Nestor, Lynn. 

Norfolk District (Norfolk County). — Myron N. Lane, Quincy. 
Assistants, J. Blake Thaxter, Jr., Cohasset; Edward H. Libertine, 
Braintree; Walter E. Palmer, Brookline. 

Southern District (Barnstable, Bristol, Dukes and Nantucket 
Counties). — Edmund Dinis, New Bedford. Assistants, Peter B. Gay, 
Taunton; Joseph P. Harrington, New Bedford; Ayres A. Sequeira, 
New Bedford; Roger F. Sullivan, Fall River; Robert W. McDonald, 
Sandwich; Donald J. Sullivan, New Bedford. 

Middle District (Worcester County). — William T. Buckley, 
Worcester. Assistants, John F. Driscoll, Worcester; Manuel Morse, 
Worcester; Stanley J. Jablonski, Worcester; Anthony N. Compagnone, 
Milford; Lawrence S. O'Connor, Worcester; John M. O'Connor, 
Fitchburg. 

Western District (Hampden and Berkshire Counties). — Matthew 
J. Ryan, Jr., Springfield. Assistants, Socrates Geanacopoulos, Chicopee 
Falls; Leonard A. Gibbons, Holyoke; Clement A. Ferris, Pittsfield; 
Raymond J. Rosa, West Springfield; Emil Ober, Adams. 

Northwestern District (Hampshire and Franklin Counties). — 
Sanford Keedy, Amherst. Assistant, Oscar Grife, Northampton. 

Plvtviouth District (Plymouth County). — John R. Wheatley. 
Abington. Assistants, Robert L. Anderson, Middleborough; Alvin 
Jack Sims, Brockton; A. Stanley Littlefield, Rockland. 

Suffolk District. — Garrett H. Byrne, Boston. Assistants, Ralph 
S. Bernard, Alfred L. Bunai, Francis J. Brennan, Lawrence L. Cameron, 
William A. Doherty, James E. Foley, Newman A. Flanagan, John T. 
Gaffney, Hyman F. Goldman, Joseph A. Laurano, John F. McAuliffe. 
Joseph A. McDonough, Maurice V. McKenney, John C. Mahoney, 
Joseph A. Melley, Angelo Morello, John F. Mulhern, Gerald F. Mul- 
doon, Daniel J. Murphy, Joseph R. Nolan, John A. Pino, Murray 
Reifer, Edward M. Sullivan, Joseph C. Sullivan, Walter E. Steele. 
Executive Secretary, George E. McGunigle. Room 627, New Suffolk 
County Courthouse. 



STATE DEPARTMENTS AND 
INSTITUTIONS 



Departments, Divisions, etc. 393 

DEPARTMENTS, DIVISIONS, BOARDS, 
COMMISSIONS, ETC. 

*Chairman designated by the Governor. 

**Chairman designated by the Governor, with the advice and consent 
of the Executive Council. 

***Governor shall designate one of Governor's appointees as Chair- 
man who shall serve during his term of office. 

****Governor designates Chairman for term. 

tChairman designated by Governor from the Trustees of the Gen- 
eral Insurance Guaranty Fund for the term appointed as trustee. 
Chairman is Commissioner of Savings Bank Life Insurance. 

ttChairman appointed as Chairman for term. 

tttChairman designated for term of five years. 

[Governor's appointees corrected to May 9, 1963.] 



Administration and Finance, Executive Office for (under 

THE Governor and Council). 

[General Laws, Chapter 7.] 

Commissioner of Administration, William A. Waldron, Wayland. 
Room 312, State House. ^ 

First Deputy Commissioner of Administration, Raymond I. Rigney, 
Winchester. Room 312, State House. 

Assistants to the Commissioner o''' Administration: Walter R. Baylies, 
Taunton, and Jeremiah D. Crowley, Boston. Room 312, State House. 

Deputy Commissioner and Comptroller, Joseph Alecks, Boston, 1965. 
Deputies, John A. Ronan, Milton; Thomas J. Sullivan, Boston. Room 
109, State House. 

Deputy Commissioner and State Purchasing Agent, Alfred C. Holland, 
Boston, 1964. Deputy State Purchasing Agent, Edward R. Dickhaut, 
Belmont. Room 315, State House. 

Fiscal Affairs Division. Deputy Commissioner for Fiscal Affairs, 
Robert H. McClain, Jr., Boston. Room 312, State House. 

Budget Bureau, Edwin T. Hebert, {Director), Needham; Joseph F. 
O'Connell, {Deputy Director), Cambridge. Room 410, State House. 

Bureau of Hospital Costs and Finances, Theodore W. Fabisak, {Di- 
rector), Sagamore. 20 Beacon Street, Boston. 

Bureau of Personnel, James G. Walsh {Deputy Director), Boston. 
Room 413, State House. 

Management Bureau, James R. McPherson, {Director), Beverly. 
Room 312, State House. 

Central Services Division. Deputy Commissioner for Central Services, 
Andrew C. Gallano, A^awam. Room 312, State House. 

Bureau of Building Construction, Horace M. Chase, {Director), Stone- 
ham. 38 Chauncy Street, Boston. 



394 Departme?its, Divisions, etc. 

Bureau of State Buildings, Dino DiCarlo, {State Superintendent of 
Buildings), Newton, 1965. Anthony J. Puleo, (Assistant Superintend- 
ent), Woburn. Room 123, State House. 

Counsel to the Commissioner of Administration, Paul G. Counihan, 
Concord. Room 312, State House. 

Coordinator of Intergovernmental Relations, Sherwood J. Tarlow, 
Newton. Room 312, State House. 

Director of Program Planning and Research, Joseph F. Courtney, 
Wilmington. Room 312, State House. 

State House Physician, Dr. Solomon L. Skvirsky, Brookline. Room 
277, State House. 

Advisory Commission on Academically Talented Pupils. 
[General Laws, Chapter 15, § 6C.] 
Kathryn L. O'Brien, Head Emeritus Foreign Languages, Brookline, 
1963; Ahce B. Beal, Assistant Superintendent of Schools, Springfield, 
1963; Ann W. Lake, Massachusetts Association State College Alumnae, 
(Secretary), Dedham, 1963; Thomas F. O'Brien, Somerville Schools, 
Somerville, 1963; Elmer F. Mapes, Superintendent of Schools, Wty- 
mouth, 1964; Shirley R. Lewis, President, Massachusetts Association of 
School Committees, 1964; Marion R. Lupiscu, Boston Public Schools, 
Boston, 1964; Richard A. Clark, Superintendent of Foreign Languages, 
Waltham Public Schools, (Vice-Chairman), Waltham, 1964; Theodore 
Herberg. Pittsfield Public Schools, Pittsfield, 1965; Donald R. Nicker- 
son. Harvard College, Arts and Sciences (Chairman), Cambridge, 1965; 
Margaret M. Callahan, Boston Public Schools, Boston, 1965. 

Advisory Committee, Division of Hospital Costs and 

Finances. 

[General Laws, Chapter 7, §§ 6C. 6D.] 

Amy Julie Daniels, Ludlow, 1964; James H. Sullivan, Attleboro, 

1964; Augustine C. Dalton, Boston, 1965; Abbie E. Dunks, Belmont. 

1965; Modest Mele, Everett, 1966; Carl J. Gilbert (Chairman), Dover, 

1966. 20 Beacon Street, Boston. 

Advisory Standardization Board, State Purchasing Agent (Chairman) 
and representatives of the several state departments, offices and com- 
missions. 

* The Aging, Council for. 

[General Laws, Chapter 6, § 73.] 

Appointed by the Governor, Margaret Ells, Springfield, 1964; Rev. 

Joseph T. Alves (Chairman), Boston. 1964; Sidney Cohen, Brookline. 

1965; Dr. Robert Morris, Lexington, 1966. Executive Secretary, Francis 

W. Looney. 167 Tremont Street. Boston. 

Other members. Commissioners of Education, Mental Health, Public 
Health, Public Welfare, Labor and Industries. 



Departments, Divisions, etc. 395 



Agriculture, Department of. 
[General Laws, Chapter 20.] 

Commissioner of Agriculture, Charles H. McNamara, Stoughton, 1965; 
Assistant Commissioner, Charles F. Shelnut, Somerville. 41 Tremont 
Street, Boston. 

Board of Agriculture, Kendall Crocker, Ashby, 1963; Vincent J. Riley, 
Somerset, 1964; Myron A. Maiewski, Whately, 1965; John Pena, 
Falmouth, 1966; Howard H. Murphy, Walpole, 1967; Donald L. Crooks, 
North Brookfield, 1968; John Prentice, Plymouth, 1969. 

Division of Dairying and Animal Husbandry, J. Peter Griffin (Di- 
rector), Boston. 41 Tremont Street, Boston. 

Division of Livestock Disease Control, Edward M. Dwyer (Director), 
Weymouth. 41 Tremont Street, Boston. 

Division of Markets, Louis A. Webster (Director), Stoneham. 41 
Tremont Street, Boston. 

Division of Milk Control, Jerry Bond, Jr. (Director), Needham. 
Secretary, George W. Killion, Boston. 41 Tremont Street, Boston. 

Division of Plant Pest Control and Fairs, Daniel Reidy (Director), 
Weymouth; Peter C. Kuzmiski (Assistant Director of Plant Pest Con- 
trol), Randolph. 41 Tremont Street, Boston. 

Apiary Inspection, Milo R. Bacon (Chief Apiary Inspector), Norwood. 
41 Tremont Street, Boston. 

Farm Aid Bureau for Veterans, John J. McColgan (Attorney), Boston. 
41 Tremont Street, Boston. 

Division of Poultry, Pierre Boucher (Director), Worcester. 41 Tre- 
mont Street, Boston. 

Also see Milk Control Commission; Milk Regulation Board; State 
Reclamation Board; State Soil Conservation Committee. 

* Alcoholic Beverages Control Commission. 
[General Laws, Chapter 6, §§ 43-45.] 
Cornelius W. Phillips, Jr., Springfield, 1963; Lawrence W. Lloyd 
(Chairman), Melrose. 1964; Quinton J. Cristy, Shrewsbury, 1965. 

Executive Secretary, William H. Hearn, Cambridge. 24 School Street 
(Room 806), Boston. 

The American Legion, Department of Massachusetts. Inc. 
Headquarters, Room 159, State House. 

American Veterans of World War II (AM VETS). 
Headquarters, Department of Massachusetts, Room 213C, State House. 



396 Departments, Divisions, etc. 



** Appellate Tax Board. 
[General Laws, Chapter 58A.] 
George F. McMahon, Boston, 1964; Peter J. Allen, Boston, 1965; 
Saul Gurvitz, Boston, 1966; Daniel E. McLean {Chairman), Beverly, 
1967; Christopher N. Pilavis, Somerville, 1969. Clerk, Ernest W. 
Ricker, Quincy. Senior Attorney, Louis Rosenthal, Maiden. Attorneys, 
Anthony Mosca, Watertown; Francis X. Ahearn, Boston. 20 Somer- 
set Street, Boston. 

Apprenticeship Council (Department of Labor and 
Industries). 
[General Laws, Chapter 23, §§ llE-UL.] 
Appointed by the Commissioner of Labor and Industries, Frederick 
Leslie Bloodworth {representing the employers), Arlington, 1966; David 
P. McSweeney {representing the employees) , Boston, 1966; Clifton E. 
Sommers {representing the employees), Quincy, 1964; Harry F. Howard 
{Chairman) {representing the employers), Norwood, 1964; Alfred Ellis 
{representing the employees), Boston, 1965; Leonard Young {represent- 
ing the employers), Newton, 1965. Assistant Director of the Division of 
Employment Security, ex officio: Director of the Division of Vocational 
Education in the Department of Education, ex officio. 

Architects, Board of Registration of (Department of Civil 

Service and Registration). 

[General Laws, Chapter 13, §§ 44A-44D.] 

Fred A. Dyer {V ice Chairman) , Wellesley, 1964; James R. Hanlon 

{Chairman), Quincy, 1965; Prentice Bradley {Secretary), Pittsfield. 

1966; WilHam Geddis, Chestnut Hill 1967; Frank M. Mahoney, 

Northampton, 1968. Room 34, State House. 

Armory Commission. 
[General Laws. Chapter 6, § 18; Acts 1937, 300.] 
The Adjutant General of Massachusetts {Chairman); State Quarter- 
master; Commanding General, 26th Infantry Division, Massachusetts 
National Guard. 905 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, 15. 

Art Commission for the Commonwealth. 

[General Laws, Chapter 6, § 19.] 

Joseph A. Coletti {Chairman), Boston, 1965; Sidney N. Shurcliff 

{Secretary), Boston, 1965; Vernon B. Hitchins, Dedham, 1965; 

Ernest A. Siciliano, Newton, 1965; Allan A. Davidson, Brookline, 1965. 



Departments, Divisions, etc. 397 



Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission. 

[Acts 1941, 489; 1945. 30.] 

Commissioners, Salvatore J. Favazza, Gloucester, 1965; Charles H. 

W. Foster, Wellesley {Commissioner of Natural Resources); Senator 

Stanley J. Zarod of Springfield {Designated by Commission on Interstate 

Co-operation) . 

Atomic Energy, Massachusetts Commission on. 
[General Laws, Chapter 6, §§ 85-93.] 
Co-ordinator of Atomic Development Activities {Chairman), Raymond 
I. Rigney, Winchester {serves during the pleasure of the Governor). 

Samuel Levin, Boston, 1963; Joseph J. Fitzgerald, Winchester, 1964; 
James B. McDonough, Boston, 1965; Manson Benedict, Weston, 1966; 
Josiah A. Spaulding, Manchester, 1967, Maurice Gordon, Newton, 
1967. 150 Causeway St., Boston. 

Ballot Law Commission, State, and Voting Machine 
Examiners, State Board of. 
[General Laws, Chapter 6, § 29.] 
Robert J. O'Hayre {Chairman), Cohasset, 1963; Michael V. Mans- 
field, Springfield, 1964; Wilham E. Ginsburg, Newton, 1965. 

Bank Incorporation, Board of (Department of Banking and 

Insurance). 

[General Laws, Chapter 26, § 5.] 

The Commissioner of Banks; the Treasurer and Receiver-General; 

the Commission of Corporations and Taxation. Clerk, Daniel J. 

O'Connor, Lowell. 150 Causeway St., Boston. 

Banking and Insurance, Department of. 
[General Laws, Chapter 26.] 
See Banks and Loan Agencies, Division of; Fire Insurance Rates, 
Board of Appeal on; General Insurance Guaranty Fund; Insurance. 
Division of; Savings Bank Life Insurance, Division of. 

Banks and Loan Agencies, Division of (Department of Banking 
AND Insurance). 
[General Laws, Chapter 26.] 
Commissioner of Banks, John B. Hynes, Boston, 1966. Deputy Com- 
missioner of Banks, Daniel J. O'Connor, Lowell. 150 Causeway St., 
Boston. Chief Director of Bank Examtnalions, Arthur B. Malone, 
Chelsea. 



398 Departments, Divisions, etc. 



Division of Trust Companies, {Director of Examinations) Louis F. 
Orfanello, Weymouth. {Assistant Director of Examinations) Edward 
R. Brady, Boston. 

Division of Savings Banks, {Director of Examinations) William P. 
Morrissey, Brookline. {Assistant Director of Examinations) Aldei C. 
Bourgeois, Lowell. 

Division of Co-operative Banks, {Director of Examinations) David J. 
Coleman, Milton. {Assistant Director of Examinations) William A. 
Warren, Wellesley. 

Division of Credit Unions, {Director of Examinations) Carl H. Baker, 
Wollaston. {Assistant Director of Examinations) Paul Donovan, 
Boston. 

Division of Research and Statistics, {Director) Laurie A. Ebacher, 
Amesbury. {Bank Investments Supervisor) John W. Gorman, Boston. 

Supervisor of Loan Agencies, Martin J. Hanley, Westwood. {Assist- 
ant Supervisor and Rate Analyst) Robert S. Leadbetter, Weymouth. 

Small Loan Regulatory Board, {vacancy), {representing organized 
labor). Terms concurrent with the governor. 

Attorney, John P. Clair, Winchester. 

Assistant Attorney, Robert F. Lovett, Newtonville. 

Barbers, Board of Registration of (Department of Civil Service 
AND Registration). 
[General Laws, Chapter 13, §§ 39-4L] 
Louis A. Sisca {Chairman), Fall River. 1964; Frank A. Paradiso, 
Milford, 1965; Frank R. Ciampa, Boston, 1966. {Secretary) An- 
thony J. Bellio, 15 Ashburton Place, Boston. 

Bar Examiners, Board of (Appointed by the Justices of the 

Supreme Judicial Court). 

[General Laws, Chapter 221.] 

Walter Powers {Chairman), Boston (77 Franklin Street, Boston); 

Horace E. Allen {Secretary), Longmeadow; Robert W. Meserve, 

Waltham; Fredric S. O'Brien, Andover; Stanley B. Milton, Worcester. 

Executive Secretary, Ellen E. Sterritt. 77 Franklin St., Boston. 

Boiler Rules, Board of (Appointed by the Commissioner of 
Public Safety). 
[General Laws, Chapter 22. § 10.] 
Thomas Dickson {supervising district engineering inspector), Dorches- 
ter {Chairman)', James Nicol, Weymouth {representing boiler insurance 
interests), 1966; Arthur L. Simpson, Lowell {representing operating en- 



Departments, Divisions, etc. 399 

gineers), 1964; Willard F. Whitman, Belmont {representing boiler-using 
interests), 1965; John Lynch, Winchester {representing boiler-manufac- 
turing interests), 1964. 1010 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston. 



* Boston, Finance Commission of the City of. 

[Acts of 1909, Chapter 486.] 

Joseph P. McNamara, Boston, 1963; Maxwell B. Grossman, Boston, 

1965; Andrew A. Hunter, Boston, 1966; Roger J. Abizaid, Boston, 

1967; Francis G. Poitrast, Boston, 1964. Executive Secretary, Thomas 

J. Murphy, Cambridge. 24 School Street (Rooms 710-715), Boston. 

* Boston, Licensing Board for the City of. 
[Acts 1906, 291; 1935,355; 1945.305; 1950,403; 1955,62.] 
Timothy F. Tobin, Boston, 1964; John J. Callahan {Chairman), 
Boston, 1966; Clarence R. Elam, Boston, 1968. Secretary, Edwin J. 
Thomas, Boston. 24 Province Street, Boston. 

Boston, Police Commissioner for the City of. 
{Appointed by the Mayor of the City of Boston.) 
[Acts 1906, 291; 1938,377; 1945,698; 1953,452; 1962,322.] 
Edmund L. McNamara, Boston, 1967. Super iyitendent, Francis J. 
Hennessy, Boston. 154 Berkeley Street, Boston. 



* Boston Arena Authority. 
[Acts 1953, Chapter 669.] 
Edward T. Sullivan {Secretary-Treasurer) , Belmont, 1963; Eugene J. 
Durgin, Quincy, 1964; Morris Garfinkle, Swampscott, 1965; Augustus 
J. Migell, Newton {Chairman), 1966. Commissioner, Metropolitan 
District Commission {Ex Officio). General Manager, Joseph C. Toma- 
sello, 238 St. Botolph Street, Boston. 



Boston Metropolitan District. 
[Acts 1929, 383; 1932, 147; 1953, 473.] 
Trustees appointed by the Governor, Harry P. Grages, Wareham, 1963; 
William H. Reardon, Jr. {Treasurer), Cambridge. 1965; Henry G. 
Gomperts {Chairman) , Boston, 1967; Vernon B. Hitchins, Dedham, 
1969. Trustee appointed by the Mayor of Boston, Charles A. Birming- 
ham {Clerk), Boston. 1963. 73 Tremont Street. Boston. 



400 Departments, Divisions, etc. 



* Boxers' Fund Board. 
[General Laws, Chapter 6, § 99.] 
Leonard Liotta, Braintree, 1964; Meyer Nadelberg {Chairman), 
Brookline, 1965; Rocco Marchegiano, Hanson, 1966. Ex Officio: — 
Commissioner of Public Safety, State Treasurer and Receiver General. 
1010 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston. 

Buildings, State Superintendent of ("Care and Maintenance 
OF THE State House", etc.). 
[General Laws, Chapter 8.] 
Superintendent, Dino DiCarlo, Newton, 1963. Assistant Super- 
intendent, Anthony J. Puleo, Woburn. Room 123, State House. 

Certified Public Accountants, Board of Registration of 
(Department of Civil Service and Registration). 
[General Laws, Chapter 13, §§ 33-35.] 
John J. Sweeney (Chairman), Springfield, 1963; Laurence P. Har- 
rington (Secretary), Arlington, 1964; Harold P. Silbert, Newton, 1965; 
Kenneth W. Bergen, Lincoln, 1966; Edward J. McDevitt, Winchester, 
1967. Room 33, State House. 

* Chelsea, Board of Excise for the City of. 
[Special Acts 1916, Chapter 310.] 
Bernard L. Sullivan, Chelsea, 1963; Hyman Pike (Chairman), 
Chelsea, 1964; Clifton W. Clarke, Chelsea, 1965. Clerk, Henry G. 
Hughes, City Hall, Chelsea. 

Chiropody (Podiatry), Board of Registration in (Department 

OF Civil Service and Registration). 

[General Laws, Chapter 13, §§ 12A-12C.] 

Humphrey L. McCarthy, Boston, 1963; Gabriel H. Kitchener, 

Springfield, 1964; Robert Tabachnick (Secretary). Boston, 1965; 

Charles H. Thorner (Chairman) , Quincy, 1966; Joseph B. Addante, 

Fitchburg, 1967. Room 3i, State House. 

Civil Defense Agency. 
[Acts 1950, Chapter 639.] 
Major General John J. Maginnis, Worcester, Director of Civil Defense. 
400 Worcester Road, Framingham. 



Departments, Divisions, etc. 401 



Civil Service and Registration, Department of. 
[General Laws, Chapter 13.] 

* Commissioners of Civil Service, Maurice- J. PoyanU New Bedford, 
1962; Jam€sJt^- Lcvcii3ohn, D rookline, 1964; Hugh Morton, Fall River, 
1965; Joh»-G,-CaHv-J*.-(^a/r7waK), Medford, 1966; {vacancy) 1968. 
Director of Civil Service, W. Henry Finnegan, Everett, 1967. Room 148, 
State House. 

Division of Registration, Helen C. Sullivan, Milton, 1964 {Director of 
Registration), Administrative Assistant to Director, Lillian M. Wait, 
Cambridge. Room 33, State House. 

See Architects, Board of Registration of; Barbers, Board of Regis- 
tration of; Certified Public Accountants, Board of Registration of; 
Chiropody (Podiatry), Board of Registration in; Dental Examiners, 
Board of; Dispensing Opticians, Board of Registration of; Electricians, 
State Examiners of; Electrologists, Board of Registration of; Em- 
balming and Funeral Direction, Board of Registration in; Hairdressers, 
Board of Registration of; Medicine, Board of Registration in; Nurs- 
ing, Board of Registration in; Optometry, Board of Registration in; 
Pharmacy, Board of Registration in; Plumbers, State Examiners of; 
Professional Engineers and Land Surveyors, Board of Registration of; 
Real Estate Brokers and Salesmen, Board of Registration of; Sani- 
tarians, Board of Registration of; \'eterinary Medicine, Board of 
Registration in. 

Commerce, Department of. 

[General Laws, Chapter 23A.] 
Commissioner of Commerce, John T. Burke, Clinton, 1963. Deputy 
Commissioners, James F. Reynolds, Everett; George A. Wells, Worces- 
ter. Assistant Commissioner, John Joseph Moaklej', Boston. Assistant 
to the Commissioner, Daniel P. McGillicuddy, Boston. Division of 
Research, William P, Tsaffaras {Director), Chelmsford. Division of 
Planning, Normand O. Pothier {Director), Bradford. Division of 
Development, William J. Sugrue {Director), Needham. Division of 
Vacation Travel, Lawrence J. Flynn {Director), Boston. Women's Di- 
vision, Marcia L. Memmott {Director), Beverly. 150 Causeway Street, 
Boston. 

Comptroller's Bureau (of the Commission on Administration 
and Finance). 
[General Laws, Chapter 7.] 
Comptroller, Joseph Alecks, Boston, 1965. Deputies, John A. Ronan, 
Milton; Thomas J. Sullivan, Boston. Room 109, State House. 



402 Departments, Divisions, etc. 



Connecticut River Valley Flood Control Commission. 
[Acts 1951, Chapter 692; 1958,351.] 
Appointed by the Governor, John S. Bryon, Hadley, 1966; Director, 
Division of Waterways, Department of Public Works; Chairman, Water 
Resources Commission. 



Corporations and Taxation, Department of. 
[General Laws, Chapter 14.] 

* State Tax Commission, Edward C. Wilson (Member), Belmont, 1965; 
Guy J. Rizzotto (Member), Medford, 1967; Leo E. Diehl (Chairman), 
Belmont, 1969; Neil P. Shea, Executive Assistant to the State Tax Com- 
mission, Melrose. 80 Mason Street, Boston, 7th Floor. Michael A. 
Porazzo, Legislative Assistant, Boston. Room 252, State House. 

Division of Administrative Services, Leo E. Diehl, Commissioner. 

Bureau of Administrative Services, Robert C. M. Mulcahy (Chief of 
Bureau), Watertown. 

Bureau of Analysis and Processing, Alexander W. Terzis (Chief of 
Bureau), Belmont. 

Legal Bureau, Abraham I. Zimon (Chief of Bureau and Tax Counsel), 
Boston. 

Bureau of Planning and Research (vacancy) (Chief of Bureau), Boston. 

Division of State Taxes, Guy J. Rizzotto, Associate Commissioner. 

Bureau of Collections, Edward J. Fitzgerald (Chief of Bureau), 
Needham. 

Bureau of Corporations, Owen L. Clarke (Chief of Bureau) . Boston. 

Bureau of District Offices, J. Frank Kelley (Chief of Bureau), Medford. 

Bureau of Excises, Stephen S. Higgins (Chief of Bureau), Quincy. 

Income Tax Bureau, William A. Cummings (Chief of Bureau), 
Quincy. 

Inheritance Tax Bureau, George Luftman (Chief of Bureau), Boston. 

Bureau of Special Investigations, Thomas A. McDonough (Chief of 
Bureau), Scituate. 

Division of Local Finances, Edward C. Wilson, Associate Commis- 
sioner. 

Bureau of Accounts, Arthur H. MacKinnon (Director of Accounts), 
Brookline. 

Bureau of Local Assessment, Edmund W. Giblin (Chief of Bureau), 
Boston. 

Bureau of Local Taxation, John J. Falvey (Chief of Bureau), Holyoke. 

See also Appellate Tax Board. 



Departments, Divisions, etc. 403 



Corporation Division, Office of the Secretary of the Common- 
wealth. 
Director: Theodore V. Anzalone. Assistant: Timothy J. Ring. 
Corporations filings and records, Room 130, State House. 

Correction, Department of. 
[General Laws, Chapter 27.] 

Commissioner of Correction, George F. McGrath, Roslindale, 1965. 
Deputy Commissioners, Vincent F. Rice, Concord; Raymond R. Gilbert, 
Ph.D., Jamaica Plain; Edwin Powers, Brighton. Secretary to Commis- 
sioner, Dorothy K. Hartwell, Boston. 6th floor, 120 Tremont Street, 
Boston 8. 

* Advisory Committee on Correction, ex-officio members, Commissioner 
of Correction; Chairman of the Parole Board; Commissioner of Pro- 
bation. Governor's appointees, James A. Broyer, Boston 1963; Harry 
C. Solomon, M.D., Boston, 1963; Helen Mejan, Medford, 1963; Walter 
Powers, Jr. (Chairman), Wellesley, 1964; Richard E. Thompson, Bev- 
erly, 1964; Adelaide C. Hill, Ph.D., Watertown, 1964; Monsignor 
Robert J. White, Old Orchard, Maine, 1965; Donald P. Tulloch, 
Barnstable, 1965; Angelo Musto, Boston, 1965. 

See Parole Board. 

Dental Examiners, Board of (Department of Civil Service and 

Registration). 

[General Laws, Chapter 13, §§ 19-21.] 

Thomas M. O'Leary {Secretary), Stoughton, 1964; H. Richard Sonis 

(Chairman), Newton, 1965; Ivor P. Muzzey, Athol, 1966; George A. 

Kentros. Worcester, 1967; Patrick J. Foley, Boston, 1968. Room 33, 

State House. 

Disabled American Veterans. 
Headquarters, Department of Massachusetts. Room 518, State House. 

Dispensing Opticians, Board of Registration of (Department 

OF Civil Service and Registration). 

[General Laws, Chapter 13, §§ 48-50.] 

Charles W. Holden {Secretary), Melrose, 1964; Ralph J. Rubinoff, 

Newton. 1965; Robert F. Kelly, Springfield. 1966; Arthur S. Kelley. 

Lynn, 1967; Rizieri A. Camilloni {Chairman), Southbridge. 1968. 

Room 33. State House. Boston. 



404 Departments, Divisions, etc. 



Education, Department of. 

[General Laws, Chapter 15.] 

(For Schools under this Department see page 440.) 

Commissioner of Education, Owen B. Kiernan, Milton. 

Deputy Commissioner of Education, Thomas J. Curtin. 

Board of Education — Alice Maxson Pederson, Great Barrington, 
1963; Stuart Macmillan, Boston, 1964; William E. Park {Vice Chair- 
man), Brookline, 1965; Joseph A. Salerno, Boston, 1966; Leo C. 
Donahue (Secretary), SomerviUe, 1967; Philip J. Driscoll (Chairman), 
Dedham, 1968; John W. AlcDevitt, Bedford, 1969; James R. Kil- 
lian, Jr., Cambridge, 1970; Abram L. Sachar, Waltham, 1971. As- 
sistant Secretary, Mary E. McKay. 

Board of Collegiate Authority — Commissioner of Education, Owen B. 
Kiernan {Chairman, ex-officio), Milton. Dorothy M. Bell, Haverhill, 
1963; Alice Maxson Pederson, Great Barrington, 1963; Stuart Mac- 
millan, Boston, 1964; Martin Lichterman, Lexington, 1964; William E. 
Park, Boston, 1965; Mildred C. Thelen, Lynn. 1965; Joseph A. Sa- 
lerno, Boston, 1966; Very Reverend Richard H. Sullivan, North Easton, 
1966; Leo C. Donahue, SomerviUe, 1967; Philip J. Driscoll. Waltham, 
1968; John W. McDevitt, Waltham, 1969; James R. KilHan. Jr., Cam- 
bridge, 1970; Abram L. Sachar, Waltham, 1971. Secretary, Mary E. 
McKay. Agent, James E. Burke. 

State Board for Vocational Education — The nine members of the 
Board of Education, plus one member representing labor to be ap- 
pointed by the Governor. {Vacancy.) Commissioner of Education, 
ex-officio and Executive Officer. 
"" Division of Research and Statistics, Raymond S. Dower, Jr. (Director). 
200 Newbury Street, Boston. 

Division of Elementary and Secondary Education, Warren E. Benson 
(Acting Director). 200 Newbury Street, Boston. 

— Division of Special Education, Philip G. Cashman (Director). 200 
Newbury Street, Boston. 

~" Division of State Teachers Colleges, John Gillespie (Director) ; Francis 
X. Guindon (Assistant Director). 200 Newbury Street, Boston. 

Division of Teachers' Certification and Placement, John P. McGrail 
^(X)irector). 200 Newbury Street, Boston. 

Division of Vocational Education, Walter J. Markham (Director); 
John F. Shea (Assistant Director). 200 Newbury Street, Boston. 

Division of University Extension, Franklin P. Hawkes (Director). 
200 Newbury Street, Boston. 

— *Division of Immigration and Americanization, (Chairman), Marian 
Bullen, Cambridge, 1964; Clementina Langone, Boston, 1964; Edith 



Departments, Divisions, etc. 405 



Brickman, Boston, 1965; Carol F. Offenbach, Melrose, 1965; Gemma 
Valenti, Medford, 1966; Robert Patenuade, North Adams. 1966. 
Supervisor of Social Service, Theofilia K. Tattan. 73 Tremont Street, 
Boston. 

Division of the Bliyid, John F. Mungovan (Director), North Quincy, 
1963. Advisory Board — Robert M. Prouty (Chairman), Hingham, 
1963; Stephanie Barker. Watertown. 1964; George Alevizos, Boston, 
1965; Edward J. Waterhouse, Watertown. 1966; Gregory B. Khacha- 
doorian. Arlington, 1967. Central Office and Salesroom, 14 Court 
Square, Boston. 

Division of Library Extension, V. Genevieve Galick (Director); Alice 
M. Cahill (Assistant Director). Board of Library Commissioners, John 
A. Humphrey (Secretary), Springfield, 1963; Richard J. Sullivan 
(Chairman), Reading, 1968; John D. Kelley, Somerville, 1964; Chan- 
ning L. Bete, Greenfield, 1965; Alice R. Wallace, Fitchburg, 1966. 200 
Newbury Street, Boston. 

Teachers' Retirement Board, The Commissioner of Education (Chair- 
man); Raymon W. Eldridge, Brookline, 1963; Helen N. Theinert, 
Springfield, 1964. Executive Secretary, Joseph B. Carroll, Winthrop. 
88 Broad Street, Boston. 

Community School Lunch Program, John C. Stalker (Director). 600 
Washington Street, Boston. 

*School Building Assistance Commission, Arthur F. Eldridge, Shel- 
burne (Chairman), 1965; E. Davis Woodbury, Milton, 1965; Gabriel 
L. DiBattista, Milford, 1965; Harold Holmquist, Boylston. 1965. 
Appointed by the Board of Education, Albert B. Humphrey, South Egre- 
mont, 1965; John E. Deady, Boston, 1965. Simeon J. Domas, Admin- 
istrator. 88 Broad Street, Boston. 

Educatioxal Assistance, Board of. 
[General Laws, Chapter 15, §§ 25-26.] 
Dr. Harold C. Case (President, Boston University), Boston, 1968; 
Very Reverend Vincent A. McQuade, O.S.A. (President, Merrimacii 
College), North Andover, 1968; Salvatore Camelio, Boston, 1966; 
J. Henry Goguen, Leominster, 1966; Harry Ohns, Boston, 1966; 
Franklin J. Lane, Winchester, 1967; Andrew J. Torrielli, Belmont. 
1967; Elected by the Presidents of the State Colleges and Massachusetts 
College of Art; Daniel H. O'Leary, Lowell; Ex-Officio Members: Dr. 
Owen B. Kiernan, Milton, Commissioner of Education; Dr. John W. 
Lederle, Amherst, President University of Massachusetts; Gerhard D. 
Bleicken, President Massachusetts Higher Education Assistance Cor- 
poration. Executive Secretary, Conrad L. Kohler. 200 Newbury Street, 
Boston. 



406 Departments, Divisions, etc. 



Executive Committee for Educational Television. 
(Chapter 567, Acts of 1960.) 
[G. L. c. 71, § 13f as amended by c. 567, I960.] 
Horace W. Hewlett {Secretary, Amherst College), Amherst, 1963; Hart 
Fessenden {Headmaster, Fessenden School), Newton, 1963; John B. 
Hendershot {Superintendent of Schools), \^'akefield, 1963; William H. 
Ohrenberger {Assistant Superintendent of Schools), Boston, 1964; Rt. 
Reverend Albert W. Low {Superintendent of Schools, Archdiocese of 
Boston), 1964; William F. Young, Jr. {Deputy Commissioner of Educa- 
tion), Newton, 1964; Norman Harris {Education Director, Museum of 
Science), Boston, 1965; William M. Powers {Superintendent of Schools), 
Needham, 1965; Frederick B. Robinson {Executive Director, Museum 
of Fine Arts), Springfield, 1965; John B. Chaffee {Superintendent of 
Schools), Wellesley, 1966; John L. Fitzpatrick {Superintendent of 
Schools), Chicopee, 1966; W. Gordon Swan {Chairman, School Com- 
mittee), Milton, 1966. 200 Newbury Street, Boston. 

♦Massachusetts Board of Regional Community Colleges. 
[General Laws, Chapter 15, § 27.] 

Theodore Chase, Dover, 1963; John P. Mallan, Northampton, 1963; 
Kermit C. Morrissey {Chairman), Norwood, 1964; Nelson W. Aldrich, 
Marblehead, 1964; Roger L. Putnam, Sr., Petersham, 1964; Edward 
J. Russell, Pittsfield, 1965; Martin Sweig, Winthrop, 1965; Asa S. 
Knowles, Winchester, 1966; Margaret P. Bainbridge, Watertown, 1967; 
John E. Murray, Brockton, 1968. Ex-Officio Members: Commissioner 
of Education, Owen B. Kiernan, Milton; President of the University of 
Massachusetts, John W. Lederle, Amherst; President of the Bradford- 
Durfee College of Technology, William J. Holland, Fall River; President 
of the State College at Boston, William F. Looney, Boston. Acting Exec- 
tive Director, John V. Costello. HID State House, Boston. 

Advisory Boards for Community Colleges. 
[General Laws, Chapter 15. § 27, inserted 1958, 605; 1960, 403.] 
Massachusetts Bay Community College: Francis Lavigne, Brockton, 
1964; Miriam Myers Ritvo, Newton, 1964; George K. Coyne, Somer- 
ville, 1965; Leon Cangiano, Milton, 1965; William J. Carey, Boston, 
1966; Margaret Hopkins Bauer, Boston, 1966; John I. Taylor, Natick, 
1967; Wilma Kirby-Miller, Cambridge, 1967; Margaret C. Scott, 
Boston, 1968; Frank Lambiase, Melrose, 1968. 

Cape Cod Community College at Hyannis: Norman L. Cook, Barn- 
stable, 1964; Robert E. O'Neil, Hyannis. 1964; Henry N. Murphy, 
Hyannis. 1965; Leo J. Griffin. Falmouth. 1965; Marion Odence. 



Departments, Divisions, etc. 407 



Cotuit. 1966; A. W. Mandelstam, Hyannis, 1966; Harvey G. Clauson. 
Falmouth, 1967; Harvey H. Broadbent, Barnstable, 1967; Paul M. 
Fye, Woods Hole, 1968; Francis W. Sargent, Orleans, 1968. 

Community College in Connecticut Valley: James Grimaldi, Spring- 
field, 1964; Arthur B. Smith, Northampton, 1964; William G. Vassar, 
Springfield, 1965; Emma Anderson, Springfield, 1965; Mary Phillips, 
Springfield, 1966; Edwin M. Podolak, Hadley, 1966; Richard A. 
Carroll, Longmeadow, 1967; Joseph Radding, Springfield, 1967; 
Albert Settle, Longmeadow, 1968; Solomon Baidack, Springfield, 1968. 

Regional Community College at Greenfield: Roger Sitterly, Greenfield, 
1963; Fred A. Dunn, Greenfield. 1963; John J. Owen, Greenfield, 1964; 
Carroll E. Adams, Shelburne Falls, 1964; Pauline W. Goodell, East 
Colrain, 1965; Grace L. Mayers, Greenfield, 1965; A. E. Lumley, 
Amherst, 1966; Morton A. Slavin, Erving, 1966; John Bednarski, 
Greenfield. 1967; Raymond Kinmouth, Northfield, 1967. 

Northern Essex Community College: Ralph M. Woodcock, Haverhill, 
1963; Thomas F. Garvey, Haverhill, 1964; Sidney L. Rindler, Lowell, 
1964; Angelo Zappala, Lawrence, 1965; Anthony Athanas, Swamp- 
scott, 1965; Richard F. Holmes, North Andover, 1966; James J. St. 
Germain, Andover, 1966; J. H. Merchant Cross, Haverhill, 1967; 
Joseph A. Torrisi, Methuen. 1968; Dorothy M. Bell, Haverhill, 1968. 

Berkshire Community College at Pittsfield: John A. Clarke, Great 
Barrington, 1963; Rev. Harold Nevers, Pittsfield, 1963; Mervin Wein 
berg, Adams, 1963; Charles DeBlois, Pittsfield, 1964; John G. Moran 
Great Barrington, 1964; Shirley Linder, Pittsfield, 1964; Robert Gib- 
son, Pittsfield, 1965; James McGregor Burns, Williamstown, 1966 
Lawrence K. Miller, Pittsfield, 1967; Donald G. Butler, Pittsfield, 1967 

Central Massachusetts Community College at Worcester: Robert E 
O'Xeil, Worcester, 1964; Margaret Looney, Worcester, 1964; E. How- 
ard Donahue, Worcester, 1965; John K. McGuire, Worcester, 1965 
Richard Withstandley, Worcester, 1966; John J. O'Shaughnessy, South- 
bridge, 1966; Ruth B. Simonatis, Princeton, 1967; Andrew Holm- 
Strom. Worcester, 1967; Helen Bloom, Worcester, 1968; Corinne 
Hayden, Worcester. 1968. 

Electricians, State Examiners of (Department of Civil Service 
AND Registration). 
[General Laws, Chapter 13, § 32.] 
Ex officiis Members: The State Fire Marshal (Chairman); the Di- 
rector of Civil Service; and the Director of Vocational Education; 
Master Electrician Samuel Malins, Brighton, 1965; Journeyman Elec- 
trician Leo F. Murphy, Dorchester, 1965. Executive Secretary, William 
J. McDonough, Canton. 15 Ashburton Place, Boston. 



408 Departments, Divisions, etc. 



Electrologists, Board of Registration of (Department of Civil 

Service and Registration). 

[General Laws, Chapter 13, §§ 58-60.] 

Dr. Manuel Joao Correia-Branco, Cambridge, 1963; Eleanor F. 
Roberts {Secretary), Greenfield, 1964; Phyllis P. Bellino {Chairman), 
Boston, 1965. Room 33, State House. 

Embalming and Funeral Directing, Board of Registration in 

(Department of Civil Service and Registration). 

[General Laws, Chapter 13, §§ 29-31.] 

Michael J. Conway {Chairman), Millville, 1963; Rene J. Hebert 
{Secretary), Fall River, 1964; Edward T. O'Brien, Easthampton, 1965; 
Paul Buonfiglio, Revere, 1966; Lawrence Volpe, Jr., Framingham, 1967, 
Room 33, State House. 

** Emergency Finance Board (Department of the State 

Treasurer). 

[Acts 1933, 49, 366; 1945, 74.] 

James P. Boyle, Peabody, 1964; WiUiam G. Scotti, Beverly, 1965; 
Bernard Solomon {Chairman), Boston, 1966. John Thomas DriscoU 
(Treasurer and Receiver-General); Arthur H. MacKinnon (Director 
of Accounts); {Secretary), Luberta M. Shea. Room 503, State House. 

* Commission on Employment of the Handicapped. 
[General Laws, Chapter 6, §§ 105-107.] 

John P. Sullivan, Worcester, 1963; Martin J. Leary, Northampton. 
1963; W. Scott Allan {representing voluntary rehabilitation agencies), 
Scituate, 1963; Rev. Henry Helms {representing voluntary rehabilita- 
tion agencies), Boston, 1963; Stanley C. Wollaston {representing veter- 
ans' organizations), Boston, 1963; L R. Freelander {representing 
industry), Worcester, 1964; John J. Cotter {representing labor), Milton, 
1964; Aaron N. Solomon, Newton, 1964; Joseph R. Harold {represent- 
ing veterans' organizations), Quincy, 1964; Walter P. Muther {repre- 
senting industry), Newton, 1965; Arthur Seserman, Boston 1965; 
Solomon Rosenbaum, Fitchburg, 1965; Paul E. Affleck {representing 
voluntary rehabilitation agencies), Springfield, 1965; Francis E. Lavigne 
{representing labor), Broclcton, 1966; Louis H. C. Cialone, Revere, 
1966; Augustus H. List, Chelsea, 1966. 



Departments, Divisions, etc. 409 



Employment Security, Division' of (Department of Labor and 
Industries). 
[General Laws, Chapter 23, § § 9I-9N.] 
Director, Antonio England, New Bedford, 1964. 
Deputy Director, Kenneth V. Minihan, Weston. 

Assistant Directors, Arthur L. Hinchey, Waltham; Dewey G. Arch- 
ambault, Lowell; Charles A. McCarthy, Waban; James A. Quinn, 
Chelmsford; John F. Doherty, Boston. Chief Counsel, Chester A. 
Higley. 881 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston. 

* State Advisory Council, Susanne P. Shallna {representing the public), 
Cambridge, 1967; Eleanor F. Wheeler {representing the employers), 
Milton, 1967; Rocco Alberto {representing the employees), Boston, 1967; 
Joseph A. Dunn {representing the employers), Boston, 1969; Daniel J. 
McCarthy {representing the employees). Fall River, 1969; Hyman Segal 
{representing the public), Chelsea, 1969. 

* Board of Review, Martin F. Fay, Dover, 1963; Adam F. Stefanski, 
Webster, 1965; Albert Cole {Chairman), Lynn, 1967. 88 Broad Street, 
Boston. 

For employment offices, see Public Employment Offices, Bureau of 
(State Employment Service). 

Essex County Court House Co\lmission. 
[Acts 1963, Chapter 140.] 
Ex officiis members: County Commissioners of Essex County. 
Appointed by His Excellency the Governor: Arthur Kochakian, Haver- 
hill; Harvey A. Pothier, Haverhill; John J. Tufo, Haverhill; David J. 
Swartz. 

* Finance Advisory Board. 
[General Laws, Chapter 6, §§ 97-98.] 
Ex officio. State Treasurer and Receiver General; John K. Benson, 
Needham, 1963; Sherwin C. Badger {Chairman), Dover, 1964; Harold 
A. Cahalin, Arlington, 1965; William F. Keesler, Boston, 1966. 

Firemen's Relief, Commission on (Department of the 
State Treasurer). 
[General Laws, Chapter 10, § 21.] 
John Thomas Driscoll (Treasurer and Receiver-General); John P. 
Hearn, Weston, 1964; Francis J. Moriarty, Quincy, 1965. Elected 
by the Massachusetts State Firemen's Association, William J. McPherson, 
Jr., Beverly, 1961; Edward F. Lane {Chairman), Quincy, 1962. Secre- 
tary, Michael J. McGonagle. 294 Washington Street (Room 747), 
Boston. 



410 Departments, Divisions, etc. 



t General Insurance Guaranty Fund, Trustees of the 
(Division of Savings Bank Life Insurance). 
[General Laws. Chapter 26, §§ 9-12.] 

Thomas A. Cronin, Jamaica Plain, 1963; Daniel England, Jr., Pitts- 
field, 1964; Daniel F. Sullivan, Newton, 1965; James J. Marshall, 
Worcester, 1966; Robert A. MacLellan, Roxbury, 1967; Philip J. 
Coady, Milton, 1968; James W. Hull, North Attleborough, 1969. Clerk, 
Francis D. Pizzella, 47 Franklin Street, Boston. 

Commissioner of Savings Bank Life Insurance, Robert A. MacLellan, 
Roxbury. 1967. Deputy Commissioner, Francis D. Pizzella, Somerville. 
47 Franklin Street, Boston. 

State Actuary, Edwin L. Goldberg. Marblehead. 47 Franklin Street, 
Boston. 

State Medical Director, Edmund J. Callahan, III, Needham. 47 
Franklin Street, Boston. 

**** Government Center Commission. 

[Acts of 1960, 635. J 

Charles Gibbons (Chairman), Boston, 1965; Jeremiah Sundell, 

Newton, 1965; Albert L. Mastroianni. Springfield, 1965. Executive 

Secretary, Thomas Doherty. Room 532. 80 Boylston Street, Boston. 

♦Greater Boston Stadium Authority. 
[Acts 1962, Chapter 778.] 
Very Rev. George V. Kerr, Boston, 1963; Robert M. Jenney (Vice- 
Chairman), Brookline, 1964; William H. Sullivan, Jr. (Chairman), 
Wellesley. 1965. 

Greylock Reservation Commission. 
[General Laws. Chapter 6, §§ 46, 47.] 
William H. Shaw, Adams, 1964; J. Norman O'Connor, Adams, 1957; 
John F. Treadway, Williamstown, 1968. 

Group Insurance Commission. 
[General Laws, Chapter 32A.] 
Coleman L. Bornstein, Boston, 1963; Fred A. Lawson, Stoneham, 
1964; Theodore W. Fabisak (representing stale employees), Sagamore, 
1965; Ex officiis: Commissioner of Administration, Commissioner of 
Insurance. Executive Secretary, William A. Burke, Lynnfield. Room 
126, State House. 



Departments, Divisions, etc. 411 



* Hairdressers, Board of Registration of (Department of 
Civil Service and Registration). 
[General Laws, Chapter 13. §§ 42-44.] 
Irene F. Ward (Secretary), Brockton, 1964; Susan M. lodice. Water- 
town, 1965; Irene E. Bode, Lawrence, 1966. IS Ashburton Place, 
Boston. 

Hampden County Arena Authority. 
[Acts 1962, Chapter 693.] 
Thomas Collins, III, Springfield, 1963; Raymond TuUer, Jr., Spring- 
field, 1964; Henry A. Butova, Springfield, 1965; Bernard McMahon, 
Springfield, 1966; Ex officio: Mayor of Springfield, Romeo J. Cyr, 
designee. 



Health, Welfare and Retirement Trust Funds Board. 
[General Laws, Chapter 23, §§ lOD-lOF, 
inserted by Acts 1957, 778; 1958, 655.] 
The Commissioner of Banks; the Commissioner of Insurance and 
the Commissioner of Labor and Industries. 
Director, Daniel B. Brunton, Springfield. 
Assistant Director, Francis D. Dailey, Boston. 
Counsel, Abraham Skoburn, Boston. 
22 Batterymarch Street, Boston. 



Higher Education Policy, Advisory Board of. 
[General Laws, Chapter 15, § 3B.] 

Ex officiis Members: Owen B. Kiernan (CAairman), Commissioner of 
Education; John W. Lederle, President, University of Massachusetts; 
Martin J. Lydon, President, Lowell Technological Institute; John 
Gillespie, Director of State Colleges; Joseph M. Souza, Chairman of 
the Board of Trustees, Southeastern Massachusetts Technological In- 
stitute; Kermit C. Morrissey, Chairman of the Board of Regional 
Community Colleges. 

Appointed by the Governor: William H. Bixby, Waban, Former Budget 
Commissioner, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 1964; Samuel L. 
Lowe, Jr., Newton, Businessman, 1965; Frank W. Crimp, Milton, 
Architect, 1966; Mrs. Lucy Benson, Amherst, President of the Massa- 
chusetts League of Women Voters, 1967; John E. Murray, Wellesley, 
Faculty Member, Harvard Business School, 1968. 



412 Departments, Divisions, etc. 



ttflndustrial accidents, division of (department of 

Labor and Industries). 

[General Laws, Chapter 23, §§ 14-23.] 

Troy T. Murray, Springfield, 1963; Harry Demeter, Jr., Boston, 
1965; Joseph E. McGuire, Worcester, 1965; Arlyne F. Hassett, Water- 
town, 1966; Thomas W. Bowe, Somerville, 1967; Maurice Rogovin, 
Maiden, 1968; Walter J. Trybulski, Chicopee, 1969; Eugene H. 
Giroux, Arlington, 1970; Albert A. DeVincentis, Medford, 1971; 
Joseph J. Pulgini, Boston, 1972; Paul A. D'Agostino, Marshfield, 1973; 
James J. Gaffney, Jr. (Chairman), Tewksbury, 1974. Secretary, John 
E. Coyne, Milton. Assistant Secretary, John J. Maloney, Boston. 
Attorney, Charles J. Murphy, Boston. 150 Tremont Street, Boston. 

Medical Advisor (vacancy). 

Director of the Division of Self-Insurance, Roland A. Merullo, Revere; 
Henry F. Marshall, Stoneham (Inspector). 

Supervisor of Compensation Benefits, Michael A. Donovan, Everett. 
Disability Benefit Analysis, Marion Wheeler, Revere; Cora G. Pepin, 
Boston. 

Supervisor of Compensation Agents. 

Inspectors, Thomas J. Keefe (Chief Inspector), Medford; Joseph L 
Sousa, Boston; Albert F. Horrigan, Somerville; Leonard W. Lindahl, 
Boston; John T. Kennedy, Boston; Joseph J. Granfield, Melrose; 
Eleanor F. Donahue, Quincy; Richard A. Daly, Salem; Mary Vargis, 
Boston; Phoebe Nason, Newton; Joseph T. Barry, Maiden; Francis 
B. Cassidy, Uxbridge. 

* Industrial Accident Rehabilitation Board. 
[General Laws, Chapter 23, § 24, inserted by Acts 1956, 602.] 
Ex oficiis members. Chair wmh of Industrial Accident Board: Com- 
missioner of Rehabilitation. Soter G. Zaharoolis, Chelmsford, 1964; 
Stephen D. Merrick (Chairynan), Boston, 1965; Paul S. Goodwin, 
Boston, 1966; Karl T. Benedict, W. Boylston, 1967; Harold J. Russell, 
Natick, 1969. 

Insurance, Division of (Department of Banking and Insurance). 
[General Laws, Chapter 26.] 
Commissioner, C. Eugene Farnam, Medford, 1965. First Deputy, 
Henry M. Duggau, Newburyport. Deputies, Joseph S. O'Leary, Mil- 
ton; Matthew F. Hanley, Boston; Muriel S. Barnes, West Harwich; 
Roger E. Ingalls, Methuen. Counsel, James E. Curry, Cambridge. 
Chief Examiner, A. John Breen, Lowell. Assistant Chief Examiners, 



Departments, Divisions, etc. 413 



George F. Howarth, Boston; John A. Wedgeworth, Boston. Actuary, 
Milton G. McDonald. Medford. 100 Nashua Street, Boston. 

Motor Vehicle Liability Policies and Bonds, Board of Appeal on — 
The Commissioner of Insurance {Chairman); the Registrar of Motor 
Vehicles; Assistant Attorney-General, Edward T. Martin. 

Interstate Co-operation, Commission on. 
[General Laws, Chapter 9. §§ 21-24.] 
Appointed by the President of the Senate, Joseph F. Gibney (Chair- 
man), Webster; Stanley J. Zarod, Springfield; Fred I. Lamson, Med- 
ford. By the Speaker of the House of Representatives, John J. Toomey 
(Vice Chairman), Cambridge; James F. Condon, Boston; Anthony M. 
Scibelli, Springfield; William Q. MacLean, Jr., Fairhaven; Cornelius J. 
Murray, Beverly; Charles E. Luke Driscoll, Northbridge. By the 
Commissioners on Uniform State Laws, Edward L. Schwartz, Newton. 
Director, Division of Planning, Dept. of Commerce, Normand O. Pothier, 
Haverhill. By the Governor, Anthony A. Bonzagni, Winthrop; Vincent 
A. Errichetti, Cambridge; Philip Pane, Watertown; Charles E. Moore, 
Jr., Charlestown. Secretary, Philip M. Markley. Springfield. Clerk, 
Martha L. Gilley, Boston. 15 Ashburton Place, Boston. 

Italian American World War Veterans of United States. 
Headquarters, Department of Massachusetts, Room 185, State House. 

Jewish War Veterans of the L^nited States. 
Headquarters, Department of Massachusetts, Room 271, State House. 

Labor and Industries, Department of. 
[General Laws, Chapter 23.] 

Commissioner of Labor and Industries, John A. Callahan, Lawrence, 
1965. Assistant Commissioner, Teresa M. Gainey. Fitchburg, 1965. 
Associate Commissioners (Board of Conciliation and Arbitration); 
George S. Munroe (representing employers of labor), Springfield, 1964; 
Dominic L. Carnevale (representing labor), Beverly, 1965; Louis W. 
Maples, Boston, 1966. Secretary to the Commissioner, Jeanne T. Barry, 
Medford. Room 473, State House. 

Counsel, Raymond F. O'Connell, Boston. 

Council on the Employment of Older Workers, Richard D. Lambert, 
Worcester, 1961 ; Daniel Carey, Belmont, 1961 ; Harry Mushlin (Chair- 
man), Newton, 1962; Leo Shuman. Boston, 1962; Daniel T. Galvin, 
Canton, 1963; Elizabeth McDonald. Winchester. 1963; Other members. 



414 Departments, Divisions, etc. 

Director of Employment Security, Chairman, Massachusetts Commis- 
sion Against Discrimination and Assistant Commissioner, Departm.ent 
of Labor and Industries. 

Division of Apprentice Training, Hubert L. Connor {Director), New- 
ton. 41 Tremont Street, Boston. Rooms 901-906. 

Division of Industrial Safety, Thomas F. Kelly {Director), Andover. 
Room 473, State House. 

Division of Industrial Accidents, Board of hidustrial Accidents, see 
Industrial Accidents, Board of. 150 Tremont Street, Boston (see 
page 410). 

Division of Minimum Wage, Marion J. Casey {Director), Lexington. 
Room 463, State House. 

Division of Occupational Hygiene, Dr. Hervey B. Elkins {Acting 
Director), Belmont. 286 Congress Street, Boston. 

Division of Standards and Division on the Necessaries of Life, Donald 
B. Falvey {Director), Boston. Rooms 194 and 200, State House. 

Division of Statistics, Joseph F. King, Boston. 334 Boylston Street, 
Boston. 

See Apprenticeship CotnsrciL; Employment Security, Division of; 
Labor Relations Commission. 



* Labor Relations Commission (Department of Labor and 
Industries). 
[General Laws, Chapter 23. §§ 90-9R.] 
Stephen E. McCloskey {Chairman), Boston, 1963; Michael J. John, 
Boston, 1965; Joseph Silvano, Brookline, 1967. 20 Somerset Street, 
Boston. 

Legislative Research Council and Bureau. 
[General Laws, Chapter 3, §§ 56-61.] 

Council: Senator John E. Powers of Suffolk, President of the Senate 
{Chairman), 1963; Senator Newland H. Holmes of Norfolk and Plym- 
outh, 1963; Representative John T. Tynan of Boston {V ice-Chair man) , 
1963; Representative Stephen T. Chmura of Holyoke, 1963; Repre- 
sentative James F. Condon of Boston, House Minority Leader, 1963; 
Representative Wallace C. Crawford of Pittsfield, 1963; Harold L, 
Dower of Athol, 1963. 

Bureau: Herm^an C. Loeffler of Plymouth (Manomet) {Director); 
Samuel Brown of Winthrop {Assistant Director); James H. Powers of 
Needliam; William J. Keenan of Milton; Robert D. Webb of Medford; 
Daniel M. O'Sullivan of Dorchester; Francis E. Sweeney of Milton; 
Michael Herbert Cantwcll of Boston. Room 30, State House, Boston. 



Departments, Divisions, etc. 415 



Lynn, Trustees of the Independent Industrial Shoemaking 

School of the City of. 

[General Laws, Chapter 74, § 23.] 

-Thomas H. Spirito, 1964; William J. Mackesy {President), 1964; 
Ruth G. Black. 1965; Samuel Bollanis, 1965; Harry J. Kenerson, Jr., 
1966; John J. Cavanaugh, Sr., 1966; John F. Clancy, 1967; James J. 
Cordova, Lynn, 1967, and the Mayor. Director, Stephen R. Callahan. 
50 High Street, Lynn. 



Marine Corps League. 
Headquarters, Department of Massachusetts, Room 106, State House. 



Marine Fisheries Advisory Commission. 
[General Laws, Chapter 21, § 5A.] 

Edward T. O'Donnell, Jr., Boston, 1963; J. Alexander Michaud, 
Salem, 1963; Octavio A. Modesto, Dartmouth, 1963; Raymond Ker- 
shaw, Manchester, 1964; Robert S. Barlow, Marshfield Hills. 1964; 
Frank J. Bachoff, Boston, 1964; James F. Cahill, Jr., Marblehead, 
1965; George A. Davis, Plymouth, 1965; John C.'Worthington, Truro, 
1965. 

Mashpee Advisory Commission. 
[Acts 1954, 249: 1957, 169; 1960, 139.] 

Arthur H. MacKinnon {Chairman), Brookline, 1963; Edward C. 
Wilson, Belmont, 1963; Antonio England, 1963. 



* Massachusetts Aeronautics Co^LMISsION. 
[General Laws, Chapter 6, §§ 57-59.] 

Edmund M. O'Riordan, Dedham, 1963; Philip W. Caporale, Spring- 
field, 1964; Charlotte S. Kelley, Scituate, 1965; John M. Wells {Chair- 
man), Southbridge, 1966; James F. Nields, Hardwick, 1967. Director, 
Crocker Snow, Ipswich. General Edward Lawrence, Logan Interna- 
tional Airport, East Boston. 



416 • Departments, Divisions, etc. 



* Massachusetts Commission against Discrimination. 
[General Laws, Chapter 6, § 56.] 
Chester N. Gibbs, Springfield, 1963; Mildred H. Mahoney {Chair- 
man), Winchester, 1964; Ben G. Shapiro, Brookline, 1965. 41 Tremont 
Street, Boston. 

Massachusetts Defenders Committee. 
[General Laws, Chapter 221, §§ 34C to 34D, 
inserted by 1960, 565. amended by 1962, 366.] 
Appointed by Supreme Judicial Court: John H. Burke, Jr., Dedham, 
1963; Thomas E. Dwyer, Needham, 1963; Most Rev. Eric F. Mac- 
Kenzie, Newton, 1963; Edward J. Duggan, Boston, 1964; Frank L. 
Kozol, Brookline, 1964; Frederick S. Pillsbury, Springfield, 1964; 
LaRue Brown, Boston, 1965; Raynor M. Gardiner, Boston, 1965; 
Laurence H. Lougee, Shrewsbury, 1966; Samuel A. Wilkinson, Man- 
chester, 1966; Frederick H. Norton, Jr., Rockport, 1966. 

Massachusetts Highway Safety Committee. 
[General Laws Chapter 90A.] 
Thomas J. Rush, Boston, 1963; Bruce Campbell, Marblehead, 1964 
Victor J. Mari, Springfield, 1964; Robert S. Kretschmar, Newton, 1965 
John W. Green, Worcester, 1965; Daniel Milano, Somerville, 1965 
Nicholas P. Morrissey, Boston, 1966; Honorary Chairman, Governor 
Permanent Chairman, Registrar of Motor Vehicles; Other Members, the 
Attorney-General, Commissioner of Insurance, Commissioner of Public 
Works, Commissioner of Public Safety, Commissioner of Education, 
Chairman of the Youth Service Board, Chairman of the Metropolitan 
District Commission, and Commissioner of Mental Health. 

*** Massachusetts Parking Authority. 
[Acts 1958, 606.] 
Joseph B. Silverio {Chairman), Boston, 1965; Joseph W. Mona- 
han, Jr., Belmont, 1966; Designated by the Mayor of Boston, James J. 
SuUivan, Jr., Boston; Commissioner of Real Property of the City of 
Boston. Secretary-Treasurer, Dolores Umana Arena. 44 School Street, 
Boston. 

**** Massachusetts Port Authority. 
[Acts 1956, Chapter 465; 1958, 599.] 
Nicholas P. Morrissey, Boston, 1963; O. Kelley Anderson, Boston, 
1964; Philip H. Theopold, Boston, 1965; Ephraim A. Brest {Chair- 
man), Brookline, 1966; Hirsch M. Swig, Brookline, 1967; Laurence O. 
Albre, Jr., Brookline, 1968; (vacancy), 1969. 141 Milk Street, Boston. 



Departments^ Divisions, etc. 417 

John F. O'Halloran, Milton, Executive Director; Edward J. King. 
Winthrop, Secretary-Treasurer; James F. Byrne, Manager, General 
Edward Lawrence Logan International Airport; Robert M. Ross, Mana- 
ger, Laurence G. Hanscom Field; Ignatius C. Goode, Director, Maritime 
Division; Joseph J. Connolly, Superintendent of Terminals; J. Frank 
Donovan, Director, Mystic River Bridge, 

Massachusetts Reports, Board of Publication of (Department 
OF THE State Secretary.) 
[General Laws, Chapter 9, § 20.] 
The Attorney-General; the Secretary of the Commonwealth; the 
Report of Decisions of the Supreme Judicial Court; a member of the 
Commission on Administration and Finance. 

Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commission. 
[General Laws, Chapter 6, §§ 74-8-4.] 

Commissioner of Rehabilitation, Francis A. Harding, Dedham, 1968. 

Advisory Council: Aaron N. Solomon, Newton, 1964; Joseph Gross- 
man, Quincy, 1966; Joseph R. Jennings, Springfield, 1966; Augustus 
Thorndike (Chairman), Newton, 1968; Donald Jacobson, Newton, 
1969. 

Ex officio members. Commissioners of Public Welfare, Public Health, 
Education, Mental Health, the Director of Employment Security, 
Chairman of the Industrial Accident Rehabilitation Board. 296 Boyl- 
ston Street, Boston. 

Massachusetts School Fund, Commissioners of the. 
[General Laws, Chapter 70, § 2.] 
The Commissioner of Education; the Treasurer and Receiver- 
General. 

* Mass Transportation Commission. 

[General Laws, Chapter 16, §§ 9-11, inserted by 

Acts 1959, 416; 1960, 644.] 

Ex officio members. Chairman, Metropolitan District Commission; 

Chairman, Massachusetts Turnpike Authority; Chairman, Boston 

Traffic Commission; Chairman, Metropolitan Transit Authority; 

Chairman, Massachusetts Port Authority; Commissioner of Public 

Works; Michael Joseph Gormley, Quincy, 1964; Laey-Marr Carra,,/, 

Springfield, 1964; Robert G. Henderson (Chairman), Cambridge, 1964; 

Joseph R. Dragone, Springfield, 1965; Robert G. Davidson, Boston, 



418 Departments, Divisions, etc. 

1965. Executive Director, Joseph F. Maloney, Brookline. Special Legal 
Counsel, John J. Coffey, Milton. Head Administrative Assistant, Frank 
M. Leonardi, Jr., Sudbury. Supervising Transportation Analyst, James 
M. Geary, Lowell. 120 Tremont Street, Boston. 

**** The Massachusetts Turnpike Authority. 
[Acts 1952, Chapter 354; 1958, 598.] 
Joseph H. Elcock, Jr., Wellesley, 1966; Anthony N. DiNatale, 
Milton, 1967; William F. Callahan {Chairman), Newton, 1968. 
80 Boylston Street, Boston. 

* Medical, Dental and Nursing Scholarship Board. 
[General Laws, Chapter 6, § 100.] 
Katherine Donovan (Sister Mary Loreto, Administrator of St. Vin- 
cent's Hospital), Worcester, 1964; Eleanor A. Gaffney (representing 
Board of Registration in Nursing), Lowell, 1964; Dr. Stanley S. Stusick, 
Springfield, 1964; Dr. Sante Caldarola, Springfield, 1965; Joseph Mar- 
tins, Fall River, 1965; Dr. Ivor P. Muzzey (representing Board of Den- 
tal Examiners), Orange, 1965; Rose P. DeSuze, Concord, 1966; George 
A. Michael (representing Department of Public Health), Marshfield, 1966; 
Raymond P. Harold (Chairman), Worcester, 1966. 200 Newbury 
Street, Boston. 

Medicine, Board of Registration in (Department of Civil 

Service and Registration). 

[General Laws, Chapter 13, §§ 10-11.] 

Roger T. Doyle (Chairman), Boston, 1963; Dr. Solomon G. Hajjar, 

North Billerica, 1964; Dr. Charles A. Robinson, Milton, 1965; Anthony 

O. Cardullo, Boston, 1966; Christopher C. Conway, Milton, 1967; 

David W. Wallwork (Secretary), North Andover, 1968; Bancroft C. 

Wheeler, Worcester, 1969. Room 37, State House. 

[General Laws, Chapter 112.] 

Approving AtUhority for Colleges and Medical Schools, Pearl Hurwitz, 
Brookline, 1963; Dr. Laurence Blanke. Dedham, 1964; Dr. David W. 
Wallwork (Chairman), North Andover, 1968; Dr. Alfred L. Frechette 
(Commissioner of Public Health), Brookline, 1968. 

Approving Authority for Schools for the Training of Medical Labora- 
tory Technologists, R. Elinor Judd, Everett, 1958; John H. Bishop, 
Weston, 1958; Pearl Hurwitz. Brookline, 1963; Dr. Geoffrey P. 
Keane, Danvers, 1964; Dr. Laurence Blanke, Dedham, 1964;*^ Dr. 



Departments, Divisions, etc. 419 

David W. Wallwork (Chairman), North Andover, 1968; Dr. Alfred L. 
Frechette {Commissioner of Public Health), Brookhne, 1968. 

Approving Authority for Schools for Training of X-Ray Technicians, 
Dr. Robert E. Grandfield, Boston, 1964; Victoria M. Cass, Winchester, 
1964; Robert I. Phillips, Medford, 1964; Dr. Laurence Blanke, 
Dedham, 1964; Dr. David W. Wallwork, North Andover, 1968; 
Dr. Alfred L. Frechette (Commissioner of Public Health), Brookline, 
1968. 

Mental Health, Department of. 
(See page 440.) 
[General Laws, Chapter 19.] 

Commissioner of Mental Health, Harry C. Solomon, M.D., Boston, 
1968. 

Assistant Commissioner, James W. Dykens, M.D., Sherborn, 1965, 
Second Assistant Commissioner, Joseph P. Gentile, Medford, 1963, 

Assistant to the Commissioner (Executive), Jeremiah F. Galvin, Milton. 

Assistant to the Commissioner (Medical), Robert Hyde, M.D., Boston. 

Division of Medical Statistics and Researcit, Thomas Pugh, M.D. 
(Director), Needham. 

Division of Geriatrics. Ruth Ehrenberg, M.D. (Director), Boston. 

Division of Legal Medicine, Samuel Tartakoff, -\LD. (Director), 
Boston. 

Division of Hospital Inspection, William C. Gaebler, M.D. (Director), 
Waltham. 

Business Division, James Downing (Business Agent), Boston. 

Division of Settlement and Support, William O'Brien (Supervisor), 
Weymouth. 

Division of Mentil Hygiene, Bellenden R. Hutcheson, M.B. (Director), 
Boston. 

Merrlmack River Valley Flood Control Commission. 
[Acts 1956, Chapter 608; 1958, 350.] 
Appointed by the Governor, Michael A. Flanagan, Lawrence, 1964; 
Director, Division of Waterways, Department of Public Works; Chairman, 
Water Resources Commission. 

Merrimack River Valley Sewerage Board. 
[Acts 1936. Chapter 420 as affected by Res. 1945, Chapter 62.] 
Thomas A. Ercoline (Chairman), Medford, 1963; Wilbur N. O'Brien, 
Newburyport, 1963; Sidney P. White, Andover, 1964; Alfred Fantini, 
Haverhill, 1965; John F. Linehan, Methuen, 1965. 



420 Departments, Divisions, etc. 



Metropolitan District Commission. 
[General Laws, Chapter 28.] 

Commissioner, Robert F. Murphy, Maiden, 1965. Associate Com- 
missioners, Charles W. Greenough, Dover, 1964; Vincent P. O'Brien, 
Lynn, 1966; Max Rosenblatt, Maiden, 1967; John F. Haggerty, 
Boston, 1968. (Secretary), Richard L Furbush, Waltham. 20 Somerset 
Street, Boston. 

Water Division, Harold J. Toole (Director), Framingham. 20 Somer- 
set Street, Boston. 

Sewerage Division, Adam E. Sulesky (Director), Somerville. 20 Som- 
erset Street, Boston. 

Division of Parks Engineering, Benjamin W. Fink (Director), Newton. 
20 Somerset Street, Boston. 

Construction Division, Frederick W. Gow (Chief Engineer), Boston. 
20 Somerset Street, Boston. 



♦ Metropolitan Transit Authority, Board of Trustees of The. 
[Acts 1953. Chapter 197.] 

Anthony D. Pompeo (Transportation Field), Newton, 1963; William 
V. Ward (Labor Relations), Boston, 1965; Daniel Tyler, Jr. (Chairman) 
{A dministraiion and Finance), Brookline, 1967. 31 St. James Avenue. 
Boston. 

Advisory Board — Mayor or City Manager of each city and Chairman 
of the Board of Selectmen of each town. 



Military Reservation Commission. 

[Acts 1935, 196; 1936. 320, 344; 1938. 331; 1941, 5, 20; 1955. 665; 

1956. 617.] 

The Adjutant General of Massachusetts (Chairman); Commanding 

General, 26th Infantry Division, Massachusetts National Guard; 

State Quartermaster. 905 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston. 



* Milk Control Commission (Department of Agriculture). 
[General Laws, Chapter 20, §§ 7-9.] 

Daniel J. Hart (Chairman), Chelmsford, 1963; Josephine L Rizzo, 
Lawrence, 1965; Frank J. Bissell, Holyoke, 1967. Director of the 
Division of Milk Control, Jerry Bond, Jr.. Needham. Secretary, George 
W. Killion, Boston. 41 Tremont Street, Boston. 



Departments y Divisions, etc. 421 



Milk Regulation Board. 

[General Laws. Chapter 6, § 42.1 

Chairman, Milk Control Commission {Chairman) ; Commissioner of 

Agriculture; Commissioner of Public Health; Attorney-General. 

George Michael. Director of the Division of Food and Drugs {Secre- 

tary). Room 527. State House, Boston. 

MiLLicENT Library Fund. Commissioners of the. 
[Acts 1893, 392; 1896. 452.] 
The Commissioner of Education; the Treasurer and Receiver- 
General. 

Minimum Wage Commission (Department of Labor and 
Industries.) 
[General Laws, Chapter 23, § 7.] 
Dominic L. Carnevale. Beverly; Louis W. Maples, Boston; George 
S. Munroe. Maiden. Room 473, State House. 

Mobile Homes Commission. 
[General Laws. Chapter 6, § 108.] 
Annie Dexter. Peabody, 1963; Harry Edmed. Whitman, 1964; 
T. Peter Russo. Somerville, 1965; J. Maynard Austin, jWilliamstown, 
1966; Frank C. Gotta. East Longmeadow, 1967. 

Mount Everett Reservation Commission. 
[Acts 1908, Chapter 571.] 
William A. Straleau, Sheffield. 1964; Carl J. Chiaretto, Washington, 
1966; William F. Barrett, Jr.. Great Barrington, 1968. 

**** The Mount Greylock Tramway Authority. 
[Acts 1953, 606; 1955, 476.] 
Herbert Dobelle (Chairman), Pittsfield, 1966; Stephen Bednarz, 
Cheshire. 1967; Ernest Jones. North Adams, 1968; Francis Wojtasaek, 
Adams. 1969. Ex officio member. Chairman of the Greylocfc^'iReser- 
vation Commission. 

Mount Tom State Reservation. 
[Acts 1903. 264; 1904, 351; 1905. 413.] 
The County Commissioners of the Counties of Hampshire and 
Hampden. Chairman, William F. Stapleton, Holyoke. Superintendent, 
John A. Knox, Easthampton. 



422 Departments, Divisions, etc. 



Natural Resources, Department cf. 
[General Laws, Chapter 21.] 

Board of Natural Rrsources, Robert P. Holdsworth, East Dennis, 
1963; Thomas A. Fulham {Chairman), Wellesley, 1964; Donald B. 
Miller, Pittsfield, 1965; William O. Sweet, Attleboro, 1966; William 
S. Brewster, Plymouth, 1967. Commissioner of Natural Resources, 
Charles H. W. Foster, Needham. Executive Assistant to Commissioner, 
Robert L. Yasi, Swampscott. Department Secretary, Henry C. 
McCarthy, Milton. First Assistant to the Co?nmissioner, Bruce S. 
GuUion, Chelmsford. Assistant to the Commissioner in charge of Educa- 
tion and Information, James E. Healey, Concord. 15 Ashburton Place, 
Boston. 

Division of Forests and Parks, Raymond J. Kenney (Director), Bel- 
mont. Chief Forester, John H. Lambert, Jr., Concord. Chief Fire 
Warden, Francis B. Mahoney, FramJngham. Chief Moth Superintend- 
ent, Charles S. Hood, Ipswich. 15 Ashburton Place, Boston. 

Division of Marine Fisheries, Frederick C. VVilbour, Jr. (Director), 
Westport. Assistant Director and Biologist, Dr. Robert F. Hutton, 
Wareham. 15 Ashburton Place, Boston. 

Division of Law Enforcemejit, Howard S. Willard (Director), Quincy. 
Chief Marine Officer, Maurice P. Shaw, Weymouth. Chief Inland 
Officer, Gaylord B. Pike, Paxton. 15 Ashburton Place, Boston. 

Bureaus of Recreation, Arnold E. Howard (Chief), Lexington, 1964. 
Parks Engineer, Frederick Bowers, Wollaston. 15 Ashburton Place, 
Boston. 

Division of Fisheries and Game, Fisheries and Game Board, Bert 
Nietupski, Wilbtaham, 1963; Lawrence A. Barbieri, Great Barrington, 
1964; Roger D. Williams (Chairman), Natick, 1965; F. Stanley 
Mikelk, Gilbertville, 1966; Harry C. Darling, East Bridgewater, 1967; 
Francis W. Sargent (Director). 

Bureau of Wildlife Research and Management, Allan S. Kennedy 
(Superintendent), Bolton. 73 Tremont Street, Boston. 

Division of Water Resources, Water Resources Commission, Chairman, 
Commissioner of Natural Resources; James W. Reilly, Ware. 1963; 
Thomas J. Rouner, Lincoln, 1964; Peter C. Karalekas, Springfield, 
1965. 

Ex officio members: Commissioner of Agriculture, Commissioner of 
Commerce, Commissioner of Metropolitan District Commission, Com- 
missioner of Natural Resources, Commissioner of Public Health, Com- 
missioner of Public Works. Director and Chief Engineer, Clarence L 
Sterling, Hingham. 73 Tremont Street, Boston. 



Departments, Divisions, etc. 423 



New England Board of Higher Education. 
[Acts of 1954. Chapter 589.] 
Chester S. Keefer, Brookline, 1963; A George Gilman, Lynnfield, 
1965; John W. Lederle, Amherst, 1967. Executive Secretary, Martin 
Lichterman, 31 Church Street. Winchester. 

Massachusetts Higher Education Assistance Corporation (Acts of 1956, 
c.'298). Executive Secretary, Dudley Harmon, 604 Statler Building, 
Boston. 

New Engl.\nd Interstate Water Pollution Control Commission. 
[Acts 1947. 421; 1959. 442.] 
Alfred L. Frechette, M.D. (^Commissioner of Public Health); Charles 
H. \V. Foster {Chairman of the Water Resources Comynission); John D. 
Malgieri, Fall River, 1963; Charles Sumner Marston, 3rd, Haverhill, 
1963; William J. Ferreira, Arlington, 1965. Executive Secretary, Joseph 
C. Knox. 73 Tremont Street, Boston. 

NORTHE.A.STERN FOREST FiRE PROTECTION COMMISSION. 

[Acts 1949, Chapter 457.] 
Fred I. Lamson, Maiden {Senator, designated by Commission on 
Interstate Co-operation); Raymond J. Kenney, Belmont {Director of 
Forestry); Malcolm C. Stewart, Asiiburnham, 1964. Executive Office, 
Chatham, New York. 

Nursing, Board of Registration in (Department of Civil 

Service and Registration). 

[General Laws, Chapter 13, §§ 13-15; for reorganization, see 

Chapter 693 of Acts of i960.] 

Eleanor A. Gaffney {Chairman), Lowell, 1963; John J. Walsh, 

Boston, 1963; Hazelle Ferguson, Newton, 1964; John J. Allfano, 

Springneld, 1964; Mary A. Maher, Amherst, 1965; Nathan E. 

Silhert, Lynn, 1965; Agnes Callahan, Salem, 1966; Harold A. Callahan, 

Gardner, 1966; R. Ashton Smith, North Andover, 1967; Clyde Hock- 

meyer, Lowell, 1967; Catherine Garrity, Boston, 1968; Helen Curtis, 

Lawrence, 1968. Room 38, State House. 

Obscene Literature Control Commission. 
[General Laws, Chapter 6. § 101.] 
Rabbi Joseph Klein, Worcester, 1965; Rt. Rev. Thomas J. Riley, 
Cambridge, 1965; Rev. Pierre Dupont ViuUeumier, Barnstable, 1966; 
Joseph W. Zabriskie {Chairman), Newburyport, 1966; William J. 
McCarthy. Dedham, 1967; William F. Kane, Scituate, 1967; John 
Bond, Norwell. 1968. Room 373, State House, Boston. 



424 Departments, Divisions, etc. 



Optometry, Board of Registration in (Department of Civil 

Service and Registration). 

[General Laws, Chapter 13, §§ 16-18.] 

Joseph E. Cauley {Chairman), Holyoke, 1963; Frederick J. Wagner, 

Boston, 1964; Ernest H. Robert, Chatham, 1965; Charles R. Phillips, 

New Bedford, 1966; John E. Quinn (Secretary), Beverly, 1967, Room 

33, State House. 

* Outdoor Advertising Board (Outdoor Advertising Division, 

Department of Public Works). 

[General Laws, Chapter 16, §§ 5C-6.] 

James T. Bleiler (Chairman), Medford, 1963; Joseph V. Bottari, Jr., 

Milton, 1965. Ex Officio: Commissioner of Public Works. Executive 

Director, William F. McCarty, Lowell. 80 Boylston Street (Room 546), 

Boston. 

* Parole Board (Department of Correction). 

[General Laws, Chapter 27, §§ 4-6.] 

Joseph F. McCormack, Boston, 1963; John T. Lane, Boston, 1964; 

Tillie A. Zelesky, Worcester, 1965; Mary P. Kirkpatrick, Framingham, 

1966; Cornelius J. Twomey (Chairman), Andover, 1967. 120 Tremont 

Street, Boston 8. 

♦ Personnel Appeals Board. 
[General Laws, Chapter 30, §§ 53-57.] 
John F. O'Malley. Boston, 1963; Hubert R. Callaghan, Worcester, 
1966; Bertram W. Kohl (Chairman), Boston, 1967. 413 State House, 
Boston. 

Pesticide Board, Department of Public Health. 
[General Laws, Chapter 17, § 9A.] 
Ex officiis Members: Commissioner of Public Health (Chairman); 
Commissioner of Natural Resources; Commissioner of Agriculture; 
Commissioner of Public Works and the Chairman of the State Recla- 
mation Board or their designees. 

Pharmacy, Board of Registration in (Department of Civil 

Service and Registration). 

[General Laws, Chapter 13, §§ 22-25.] 

Anthony P. Giuggio, Boston, 1964; D. James Bacos, Lowell, 1965; 

Louis J. Rossetti (Secretary), Worcester, 1966; Romulus DeNicola, 

Milton, 1967; Joseph O. Garant, Fall River, 1968. Room 36, State 

House. 



Dt:(Hiitnu-nts, Pivisions, etc. 425 



ril.OTS. COMMISSIONKKS OK. 

K'.in.Tiil Laws. Cliuptcr 103. § 2.1 

Dislrut I {,\.hn\tov of lio3toii). Commissioners, Cni)t. Pliilip J. Fan- 
ni»K. AtliiiRton. iy(»f); Ciipl. I^eiijuiuin H. RiMcl. Sciuantiun. IVOft. 

District J (North Short.'), I)t[>uty Commissioner {vammy), l">(i6. 

Distriit 3 (South Shoie uiul Islaiuls), Ptl'Uty Commisstouer, living 
C. Henderson. Chatham. IVfiO. 

District 4 (Mount Hope liay and Taunton River), Piputy Commis- 
sioner, Arthur Chenard, vSonietset. 1960. 

Secretary. (_"apt. ll.uiy C. llowi.-. USNK (ict.). Slonehain. SH Hiuad 
Street. Boston. 

* ri.UMniCKS, 1U).\UI) OV SrATK ICX.\MINKRS OV ( I )KI'.\U I MKN r DK ("iVIl. 
SlCRVlCK AND RlilJlSrKAllON). 

[C.eneral Laws. Chapter 13, §§ 36-38.) 
Louis H. Jacol)s, West Ro.xbury, 1963; George T. S. Home, Spring- 
field, l^ol; Jackson K. Hailey (Chair man), Scituate. 1965. Secretary, 
Janu-s IC. Curry. Lowell. Room 35. State House. 

I'oi isu-Amkkuan VimcuANS OK Massaciiusictts. Inc. 
Uejilquartrrs, Department of Massaihusetts, Room 271. State House. 

I'KOUATION. COMMISSIONICR OK. 

iGeneral Lawa. Chapter 276. § 98.) 
Albert Bradley Carter, Cambridge. 1968; Deputy Commissioner of 
Frobalion, C. Eliot Sands, Boston. 206 New Court House, Boston 8. 

ruoHArioN, Committee on. 
(General Laws, Chapter 276, § 99A.] 
Chief Justice of the Superior Cotut (Chairman); Chief Justice of the 
Municipal Court of the City of Boston; Chairman of the Adndnistra- 
tive Committee of the District Courts; Two persons appointed by the 
Chief Justue oj the Supreme J udutal Court, Hon. CJilheM W. Co.\, 
Dedham. l'>(.l; lion. John J . Connelly, Huston. 19()(.. 

Prokkssional Knoinkurs anu Land Survuyors, Board ok Riigis- 

THATION ok (DlCl'ARTMlCNT OK ClVlL SltRVICK AND RlCUlSTRATlON) . 

[General Laws, Chapter 13, §§ 45-47.1 
Dr. H. Nathan Stone (Chairman), Worcester, 1964; Harrist)n I. 
Dixon (Vice-chairman), Brookline. 1965; Charles O. Haiid. Jr. (Secre- 
tary), Lynn. 1966; Llewellyn T. .Schotield. Holliston. i'Jt.n; Lynn 



426 Departments, Divisions, etc. 



Wetherill, Pittsfield, 1967; Dr. M. Lawrence Price, Worcester, 1968. 
Room 34, State House. 

Public Access Board. 
[General Laws, Chapter 21, § 17.] 
Ex officiis Members: Commissioner of Natural Resources (Chair- 
man); Director of the Division of Fisheries and Game; Director of 
the Division of Alotorboats and the Commissioner of Public Works. 

Public Bequest Commission. 
[General Laws, Chapter 6, §§ 28A-28E.] 
The Commissioner of Corporations and Taxation (Chairman); the 
Treasurer and Receiver-General; the Commissioner of Veterans 
Services. 

Public Employment Offices, Bureau of (State Employment 
Service operated by Division of Employment Security). 

[General Laws, Chapter 23, §§ 9L-9M.] 
State Einployment Offices: Athol, 534 Main Street; Attleboro, 29 Park 
Street; Boston, 6 Somerset Street (placement, clerical and sales office). 
11 Beacon Street (placement, professional and managerial office), 253 
Huntington Avenue (placement and service office), 255 Huntington 
Avenue (placement and industrial office), 400 Stuart Street (claims); 
Brockton, 25 White Avenue; Cambridge, 371 Green Street; Chelsea, 
473 Broadway (placement office), 287 Broadway (claims office); Chic- 
opee, 10 Center Street; Fall River, 446 North Main Street; Fitchburg, 
356 Broad Street; Framingham, 72 Irving Street; Gardner, 175 Con- 
nors Street; Gloucester, 18 Washington Street; Greenfield, 31 Federal 
Street; Haverhill, 38-40 Kenoza Avenue; Holyoke, 227 South Street; 
Hyannis, 225 Main Street; Lawrence, 444 Canal Street; Lowell, 291 
Summer Street; Lynn, 99 Market Street; Maiden. 213 Main Street; 
Marlborough, 186 Main Street; Medford, 10 High Street (claims office) ; 
Milford, 65 Congress Street; New Bedford, 618 Acushnet Avenue; 
Newburyport, 15 Green Street; Newton, 290 Centre Street; North 
Adams, 85 Main Street; Nortliampton, 29 Pleasant Street; Norwood, 
524 Washington Street; Pittsfield, 184 North Street; Plymouth, 39 
Court Street; Quincy, 160 Parking Way; Salem, 259 Essex Street; 
Somerville, 4 Webster Avenue (claims office); Springfield, 136 Worth- 
ington Street (claims office), 1592 Main Street (placement office); 
Taunton, 72 School Street; Waltham, 14 Spring Street; Ware, 18 
North Street; Webster, 562 Main Street; Woburn, 25 Montvale 
Avenue; Worcester, 40 Foster Street. 



Departments, Divisio7is, etc. 427 



Public Health, Department of. 
[General Laws, Chapter 17.] 

Commissioner of Public Health, Alfred L. Frechette, Brookline, 1968. 
Deputy Com?nissioner and Director of Local Health Services. Leon Stern- 
feld, Ne\\ton Center. 

Public Health Council — The Commissioner (Chairman) ; William H. 
Griffin. Boston, 1963; Charles F. WiHnsky, Brookline, 1964; Samuel 
Kovner, Brockton, 1965; Hugh R. Leavell. Cambridge, 1966; Paul J. 
Jakmauh, Milton, 1967; Gordon M. Fair, Cambridge, 1968. Secretary, 
Moira E. Nixon, Boston. Room 546, State House. 

Bureau of Administration. Division of Administration, Harry \V. 
Attwood (Z)/rec<or), Foxborough. Room 546, State House. Robert F. 
Troy {General Counsel), Milton. Room 546, State House. Division of 
Public Health Research, Development and Training. F. Randolf Phil- 
brook (Director), Randolph. Room 519, State House. 

Bureau of Environmental Sanitation. Division of Sanitary Engineer- 
ing, Worthen H. Taylor (Director and Chief Sanitary Engineer), New- 
bury. Room 511, State House. Division of Smoke Inspection, Frank 
Reinhardt (Acting Director), Needham. 

Bureau of Consumer Products Protection. Division of Food and Drugs, 
George A. Michael (Director), Marshfield. Room 527, State House. 

Bureau of Hospital Facilities. Division of Hospital Facilities, A. 
Daniel Rubenstein (Director), Ne'wton. 41 Mt. Vernon Street, Boston. 

Bureau of Preventive Medicine. Division of Cancer and Chronic Dis- 
eases, Harry T. Phillips (Acting Director), Newton Center. 755 Boyl- 
ston Street. Boston. Division of Communicable Diseases, Nicholas J. 
Fiumara (Director), Belmont. 15 Ashburton Place, Boston. Division 
of Dental Health, V\'illiam D. Wellock (Director), Newton. Room 508, 
State House. Division of Alcoholism, Edward Blacker (Acting Director), 
Belmont. 739 Boylston Street, Boston. 

Bureau of Health Services. Division of Local Health Services, Leon 
Sternfeld (Director), Melrose. Room 545, State House. District Health 
Officers: William M. Groton (Acting Director), Southeastern District. 
Lakeville; Frederick A. Dunham, Northeastern District, North Read- 
ing; Arthur E. Burke, Central District, Rutland; (unfilled). Western 
District, with offices at Amherst and Pittsfield. Section of Nursing, 
Ann Thomson (Chief), Milton. Room 505, State House. Section of 
Social Work, Catherine M. Casey (Chief), Maiden. 88 Broad Street, 
Boston. Section of Nutrition, Dorothea Nicoll (Chief), Arlington. 
88 Broad Street. Section of Maternal and Child Health, M. Grace 
Hussey (Director), Quincy. 88 Broad Street, Boston. Crippled Children 
Services, Janice Rafuse (Supervisor), Milton. 88 Broad Street, Boston. 



428 Departments, Divisions, etc. 

Division of Health Education, Marie F. Gately {Director), Revere. 
Room 524A, State House. 

Bureau of Institutions. Division of Sanatoria and Tuberculosis, 
William P. McHugh {Director), Danvers. Room 542, State House. 

Bureau of Institute of Laboratories. Geoffrey Edsall {Superintendent) , 
Cambridge. 375 South Street, Jamaica Plain. Division of Biologic 
Laboratories, James A. McComb {Director), Norwood. 375 South 
Street, Jamaica Plain. Division of Diagnostic Laboratories, Robert A. 
MacCready {Director), Dover. 281 South Street, Jamaica Plain. 

Advisory Council on Hospital Surveys and 

Construction Planning. 

[General Laws, Chapter 111, § 72B, inserted by Acts of 1960, 482.] 

Ex officio members: Chairman, Commissioner of PubUc Health; 

Commissioner of Mental Health; Commissioner of Pubhc Welfare. 

Appointed: David EU Rosengard, Boston, 1964; Augustine C. Dalton, 

Boston, 1964; Robert W. Buck, Newton, 1964; Felix L. Albano, 

Winthrop, 1964; John D. Sweeney, Newton, 1965; Francis B. Carroll, 

Newton, 1965; Harold L. Hutchins. Pittsfield, 1966; William A. 

Riley, Milton, 1966; Paul G. Cleary, Dartmouth, 1966; Nathaniel W. 

Faxon, Falmouth, 1967; A. Ernest Zangrilli, Somerville, 1967; Joseph 

Osofsky. Newton, 1967. 

Furniture and Bedding Inspection Section, (Acts of 1959, 611) Advisory 
Board: Arthur M. Warshaver {representing the supply dealers), Newton, 
1963; Max Miller {representing the mattress manufacturers), Newton, 
1964; Warren Gilford {representing the bedding association), Brookline, 
1964; Abraham Curewitz {representing the reupiiolsterers), Waltham, 
1964; Dean C. Gushing {representing the retailer), Gloucester, 1965; 
Bernard A. Riemer {representing upholstered furniture manufacturers), 
Newton, 1965; Rev. Robert J. McEwen {representing the consumer), 
Newton, 1966. 

Public Safety, Department of. 
[General Laws. Chapter 22.] 

Commissioner of Public Safety, Frank S. Giles, Methuen, 1966. 
Deputy Commissioner, Clayton L. Havey, West Roxbury. Head Ad- 
ministrative Assistant, Raymond J. Lord, Lowell. Chief Administrative 
Clerk, Chester E. Wright, Middleborough. 1010 Commonwealth 
Avenue, Boston. 

Division of State Police, under the immediate charge of the Commis- 
sioner; Lieutenant Colonel and Executive Officer, Carl M. Larson; Major 
and Adjutant, JuUan Zuk; Captain of Detectives, Michael J. Cullinane; 
Criminal Information Bureau, Captain Daniel F. DriscoU. 



Departments, Divisions, etc. 429 



Division of Inspections, Chief of Inspections, Joseph E. Duffy, Lexing- 
ton. Supervising District Engineering Inspector, Thomas Dickson. 
Building Inspector and Supervisor of Plans, Joseph Yantosca, Revere; 
Edward J. McGurn, Medford. 1010 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston. 

Division of Subversive Activities, Captain Daniel I. Murphy of Cam- 
bridge. Room 111 A, State House, Boston. 

Division of Fire Prevention, State Fire Marshal, Edward P. Gilgun, 
Woburn, 1962. Fire Prevention Engineer, Anthony D. Mastronardi, 
Revere. Captain of Detectives, Daniel A. Murphy, Andover. 1010 Com- 
monwealth Avenue, Boston. 

Bureau of Identification, Supervising Identification Agent, Robert J. 
Roth. Watertown; Identification Agent, Edward L. Reardon, Allston. 
1010 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston. 

** Board of Elevator Regulations, The Chief of Inspections, Ex officio; 
Lawrence Arena, Rockland, 1963; Alfred L. Brophy, W. Roxbury, 
1963; Edward T. Sullivan, Cambridge, 1964; Adam D. Strachan 
(Chairman), Needham, 1964; Alfred T. Comstock. Lynn, 1965; 
Theodore D. Mann, Newton, 1966; Robert E. York, Winchester, 1966; 
James F. Dooley {Administrative Secretary), Charlestown. 1010 Com- 
monwealth Avenue, Boston. 

* Board of Elevator Appeals, Commissioner of Public Safety, Ex officio; 
Edward F. Myers, Needham, 1964; Donald L. Cummings, Milton, 
1965; John T. Loftus. Dorchester, 1966; Donald L. Jacobson, Newton 
Center, 1966; David F. Nagle (Chairman), Mattapan, 1968; William 
F. Fitzgerald, Quincy, 1969. Raymond J. Lord (Secretary), Lowell, 
1010 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston. 

** Board of Fire Prevention Regulations, The State Fire Marshal, Ex 
officio; Joseph E. Lawler, Jr., Springfield, 1963; John B. Hartnett, 
Dedham, 1964; Robert M. Malloy, Lincoln, 1965; Samuel Gronich, 
Milton, 1966; Edmund F. Murphy, Somerville, 1966; Ralph L. Gar- 
rett, Newton, 1966; Frederick J. Lawson, Milton, 1967; V. Carlisle 
Smith, Dedham, 1968. James F. Dooley (Adtninistrative Secretary), 
Charlestown. 1010 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston. 

** Board of Standards, The Chief of Inspections, Ex officio; (va- 
cancy), 1963; Robert J. Stewart, Brookline, 1964; James R. Gilman, 
Framingham, 1964; Ralph J. Civitarese, Framingham, 1964; George 
J. Brennan, Jr., West Roxbury, 1966; George W. Waters, Spring- 
field, 1967; Harry P. Hogan, Springfield, 1968. James F. Dooley 
(Administrative Secretary), Charlestown. ICIO Commonwealth 
Avenue, Boston. 

Board of Teletypewriter Regulations, Roland E. Mansfield (Chief of 
Police). Saugus, 1965; Thomas H. Calnan, Pittsfielu, 1965. James 
F. Dooley (Administrative Secretary), Charlestown. 1010 Common- 
wealth Avenue, Boston. 



430 Departments, Divisions, etc. 

** Board of Schoolhouse Structural Standards (inoperative Nov. 13, 
1964; see G. L., c. 143, § 15A), Ruth Morcy {Chairman), Lexington, 
1964; RoKer C. Fenn, Concord. 19o4; Harry J. Korslund, Norwood. 
1964; Honore Savaria. West Springfield, 1964; Ex officio members, 
Simeon J. Domas, Administrator, School Building Assistance Commis- 
sion; The Commissioner of Public Safety; The Chief of Inspections. 
James F. Dooley {Administrative Secretary), Charlestown. 1010 Com- 
monwealth Avenue, Boston. 

Also see Boiler Rules, Board of; State Boxing Commission. 

* Public Utilities, Department of. 
[General Laws, Chapter 25.] 

Commissioners, Josepli F. Cleary, Cambridge. 1964; David M. Brack- 
man, Newton. 1965; George V. Flavin, Quincy, 1966; Lucy M. Carra, 
Springfield, 1967; Andrew L. Benson, Melrose, 1968; Roy C. Papalia, 
Watertown, 1969; Norman Mason {Chairman), Taunton, 1970. Secre- 
tary, Francis J. Hickey, Jr., Dorchester. Administrative Secretary, 
Andrew J. Dell'Olio, Worcester. Room 167, State House. 

Accounting Division, James F. Southwood {Chief Accountant), Canton. 

Engineering Division, Stanley W. Ellis {Chief Engineer) , Lowell. 

Railway and Bus Division, William H. Kirley {Director), Hopkinton. 

Rate and Research Division, Paul M. Fitzsimmons {Senior Rate 
Analyst), Newton. 

Telephone and Telegraph Division {vacancy) {Director). Room 178, 
State House. 

Division of Investigation of Securities, Francis J. Daley {Supervisor of 
Fraudulent Securities). Ford Building, 15 Ashburton Place (3d floor), 
Boston. 

Commercial Motor Vehicle Division, Wallace G. Kittredge {Director), 
Wellesley; {vacancy) {Assistant Director). 100 Nashua Street (9th 
floor), Boston. 

Public Welfare, Department of. 
[General Laws. Chapter 18.] 

Commissioner of Public Welfare, Robert F. Ott. West Roxbury, 1966. 
Deputy Commissioners, James M. Brennan, Boston; Robert P. Curran, 
Boston. 

Advisory Board, Harold P. Hackctt, Templeton. 1964; Charles L 
Schottland, Newton, 1964; Joan F. Snow, Provincetown, 1964; 
Muriel Snowden. Boston. 1964; Gladys Bello, Worcester, 1964; 
Maurice L Cowin. Boston. 1965; Rt. Rev. Cliarles F. Dewey. Boston, 
1965; Sidney Shapiro, Springfield, 1965; Earle A. Tompkins, East- 



Departments, Divisions, etc. 431 

hampton. 1965; Anthony J. Venna. Quincy, 1965; Ruth Batson, Bos- 
ton. 1966; Katherine Driscoll, Boston. 1966; Ella T. McCarthy. 
Marhlehead. 1966; James A. Sullivan. Northampton, 1966; F. Frank 
V'orenbery. Camljridne. 1966. 

Division of Public Assistance, Walter A. Kelly (Director), Milton. 
600 Washington Street. Boston. 

Division of Child Guardianship, John R. McGauj^hey (Director), 
Bridgewater. 600 Washington Street, Boston. 

Puni.ic Works, Dei'aktmknt of. 
[General Laws. Chapter 16.] 
Commissioner of Public Works. Jack P. Ricciardi, Wcllesley. 1965. 
Associate Commissioners, George C. Tounipouras, Boston. 1964; 
John D, Warner. Westfield, 1968. Secretary, Kdiiii I. Cronin, Wake- 
field. Chief Engineer, Edward J. McCarthy, Wellesley. Deputy 
Chief Engineer, Patrick J. Cox, Boston. 100 Nashua Street. Boston. 
District Highway Engineers: 

District No. 1, Hcrijert C. Hawkins, Veteran.-: Memorial Highway, 

Lenox. 
District No. 2, F"rancis J. Hoey, 191 Main Street. Greenlield. 
District No. 3. Frederick W. Guerin, 403 Belmont Street, Worces- 
ter. 
District No. 4, Jame8 P. Dunne, 519 Appleton Street, Arlington. 
District No. 5. Harold F. MacWilliams, 485 Maple Street, Dan- 

vers. 
District No. 6. Frederick L. Tripp, 68 Main Street. Taunton. 
District No. 7, Raymond J. Kclleher, 111 Center Street, Middle- 
borough. 
District No. 8, George E. Lybrand, 400 D Street, Boston. 
Division of Motorboats, Wilton Vaugh (Director), Scituate, 1967. 
Division of Waterways, Rodolphe G. Bessette (Director), New Bed- 
ford; Anthony W. Spadafora. Maiden, Deputy Director. 100 Nashua 
Street, Boston. 

District Waterways Engineer, Daniel S. Horgan. Auburn. 100 Nashua 
Street, Boston. 

Outdoor Advertising Division, Outdoor Advertising Board, James T. 
Bleiler (Chairman), Medford, 1963; Joseph V. Bottari, Jr., Milton, 
1964; Ex officio: Commissioner of Public Works. 80 Boylston Street. 
Boston. 



432 Departments, Divisions, etc. 



Purgatory Chasm State Reservation Commission. 
[Acts 1919, Chapter 327.] 
Margaret E. Dempsey, Millbury, 1963; Edmund A. Nowak, Worces- 
ter, 1965; Lawrence Keeler, Northbridge, 1968. 
Superintendent, E. Wesley Marble, Sutton. 

* Real Estate Brokers and Salesmen, Board of Registration 

(Department of Civil Service and Registration). 

[General Laws. Chapter 13, §§ 54-57.] 

William C. Bearce, Brockton, 1963; Arthur J. Welch, Dennisport, 

1964; Allan L. Baiardi, West Springfield, 1965; Alton H. Worrall 

{Chairman), Waxeham, 1966; Benjamin Jacobson, Newton, 1967. 

Executive Secretary, John J. Egan, 18 Tremont Street, Boston. 

Recodification Counsel. 

[General Laws, Chapter 3, § 55A.] 

Owen F. Brock, Boston, Recodification Counsel; Ralph V. Clampit, 

Boston, Assistant Recodification Counsel; Hugo S. Bagnulo, Medford, 

Legal Assistant; Mary E. Dwyer, Newton, Secretary. Room 242, 

State House. 

Records Conservation Board. 
[General Laws, Chapter 30, § 42.] 
Ex officiis Members: State Librarian, L Albert Matkov {Chairman); 
Attorney General, Edward M. Swartz, Assistant Attorney General, 
{designee); State Auditor, Thomas J. Buckley; Commissioner of Ad- 
ministration, John A. Ronan, Deputy Comptroller, {designee) ; Super- 
visor of Public Records, James F. Kane; Archivist of the Common- 
wealth, Dr. Richard W. Hale, Jr. {Secretary), Archives Building, State 
House. 

Registry of Motor Vehicles, Division of (Public Works, 

Department of). 

[General Laws, Chapter 16, § 5.] 

Registrar of Motor Vehicles, James R. Lawton, Brockton. Deputy 

Registrar, Alexander S. Kowalski, Salem. Assistants to Registrar, 

Frederick T. McDermott, Woburn; Henry E. Foran, Holyoke. Chief 

Accountant, Robert C. Capasso, Norwood. 100 Nashua Street, Boston. 



Departments, Divisions, etc. 433 



Retirement, State Board of (Department of the State 

Treasurer). 

[General Laws, Chapter 10, §§ 18-20.] 

John Thomas DriscoU {Treasurer and Receiver-General) {Chairman); 

John E. Coyne (elected by members of the Retirement System), Milton, 

1965; J. Joseph Maloney, Jr., \^'inchester, 1966. Executive Secretary, 

John J. Manning, Salem. Room 259, State House. 

* Retirement Law Commission. 
[General Laws, Chapter 6. §§ 102-104; 1958, 623.] 
John E. Coyne {Chairman) , Milton, 1964; Joseph D. Conway, Win- 
chester, 1965; Anthony N. Tomasiello, Shrewsbury, 1966; Thomas F. 
Duffy, Lynn, 1967; Harold L. Miller, Newton, 1968. 

Ex officiis Members: — Executive Secretary of the State Board of Re- 
tirement; the Executive Secretary of the Teachers' Retirement Board. 

Salem and Beverly Water Supply Board. 

[Acts 1913, 700; 1914, 632; Special Acts, 1916, 183.] 

William A. Calhoon {Chairman), Saugus, 1965; the City Engineer of 

the City of Salem; the Commissioner of Public Works of the City of 

Beverly. Clerk and Treasurer, Arthur T. Brennan, City Hall, Salem. 



Sanitarians, Board of Registration of (Department of Civil 
Service and Registration). 
[General Laws. Chapter 13, §§ 51-53.] 
Charles J. Hamilton {Chairman), Boston, 1963; Clarence L. Edward. 
Quincy, 1964; George A. Michael {Vice Chairman), Marshfield, 1964; 
Daniel G. Milano {Secretary), Boston, 1965; Robert C. Perriello, Am- 
herst, 1965. Room 33, State House. 

South Essex Sewerage Board. 
[Acts. 1925, 339; 1935, 384.] 
Chairman, Joseph C. Tomasello, Boston, 1964; Ex officiis Members, 
the City Engineer of Salem; the Commissioner ot Public Works of 
Peabody; the Commissioner of Public Works of Beverly. Appointed 
by the Town Manager of Danvers, Clifton R. Grinnell. Treasurer and 
Clerk, Louis F. O'Keefe. Salem. 



434 Departments, Divisions, etc. 



** State Boxing Commission (Department of Public Safety). 
[General Laws. Chapter 22, § 12.] 
Thomas Rawson, Arlington, 1965; Edward J. Urbec, Worcester, 
1965, Herman Greenberg {Chairman), Springfield, 1963. 1010 Com- 
monwealth Avenue, Boston. 

State Forestry Committee. 
[General Laws, Chapter 132.] 
Henry Gagnon {representing general public), Salem, 1963; Frank L. 
Blair {represetiting farm woodlot owners), Springfield, 1964; William R. 
Harrison {representing industrial woodland owners), Dalton, 1965; 
J. Harry Rich {represetiting other woodland owners), Townsend, 1966. 
Ex officio, Director, Division of Forests and Parks, Department of Natural 
Resources, 15 Ashburton Place, Boston. 

State House Physician (Commission on Administration and 

Finance). 

[General Laws, Chapter 7, § 6B.] 

Solomon L. Skvirsky, Room 277, State House. 

ttSTATE Housing Board. 

[General Laws, Chapter 6, § 64.] 

Walter Rothman, Fitchburg, 1964; Leo F. Benoit {Chairman). 

Chicopee Falls, 1965; Julius Sofinowski, Easthampton, 1966; Joseph J. 

De Liso, Longmeadow, 1967; Walter R. Detour, Everett, 1968. Clerk, 

John F. Diggins, Jr., Braintree. 120 Tremont Street, Boston. 

* State Racing Commission. 
[General Laws, Chapter 6, § 48.] 
Leo J. Madden {Chairman), Wellesley, 1964; Paul F. Walsh. New 
Bedford, 1965; Grover T. O'Brien, Chicopee, 1966. Secretary, Law- 
rence J. Lane, Waltham. 1010 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston. 

State Reclamation Board (Department of Agriculture). 

[General Laws, Chapter 252.] 
Edward Wright {Chairman); Harold D. Rose, of the Department of 
Public Health; John J. McColgan, of the Department of Agriculture; 
Bertram L Gerry {Executive Secretary), Wellesley. 41 Tremont Street, 
Boston. 



Departments, Divisions, etc. 435 



State Soil Conservation Committee (Department of 

Agriculture) . 

[General Laws, Chapter 128B.] 

Commissioner of Agriculture {Chairman). Director of Agricultural 

Experiment Station, Arless A. Spielman, Amherst; Associate Director of 

Extension Service, J. Richard Beattie, Amherst; Ellen P. Sykes, E. 

Walpole, 1963; Henry Renouf, Eelchertown, 1964; Horace Clark, 

Hathorne, 1965; E. Gerry Mansfield, Peabody, 1966. 41 Tremont 

Street, Boston. 

Suffolk County Court House Commission. 
[Acts 1935, 474; 1939. 383.] 
Appointed by the Governor, Louis P. Leonard, Boston, 1964. Ap- 
pointed by the Chief Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court, Arthur J. 
Santry (Chairman), Brookline, 1963. Sheriff of Suf oik County, Fred- 
erick R. Sullivan. Room 318, Court House, Boston. 

Thames River Valley Flood Control Commission. 

[Acts 1957, 616.] 

Samuel T. Sheard, Sturbridge, 1966. 

Appointed by the Governor, Ex officiis Members: — Director, Division 

of Waterways. Department of Public Works, Chairman. Water Resources 

Commission. 

Uniform State Laws, Commissioners on. 
[General Laws, Chapter 6, §§ 26-28.] 
Edward L. Schwartz, Newton, 1964; Robert Braucher, Belmont, 
1964; Walter D. Malcolm, Hingham, 1964. 85 Devonshire Street, 
Boston. 

United Spanish War Veterans. 
Headquarters, Department of Massachusetts. Room 158, State House. 

University of Massachusetts Building Authority. 
[Acts of 1960, 773.] 
Robert D. Gordon, Lincoln, 1963; (Vacancy), 1964; Michael J. 
Donohue, Holyoke, 1965; George N. Beauregard, Holyoke, 1966; 
George L. Pumphret (Chairman), Boston, 1967; Victoria Schuck, South 
Hadley, 1968; Bernard Solomon (Secretary-Treasurer) , Boston, 1969; 
William M. Cashin, Boston, 1970; Edward F. Williams, Newton,' 1971. 
Assistant Secretary-Treasurer: Morris Goldings. 



436 Departments, Divisions, etc. 



Urban and Industrial Renewal, Division of. 
[General Laws, Chapter 121, §§ 2 2 B-2 2 E. inserted by Acts of 1960, 776.] 

Urban and Industrial Renewal Advisory Council: Ex officio. Commis- 
sioner of Public Works; Commissioner of Public Safety; Commissioner 
of Commerce; Commissioner of Natural Resources; Commissioner of 
Public Health; Chairman of the Mass Transportation Commission; 
Chairman of the Metropolitan District Commission. 

Veterans' Services, Commissioner of. 

[General Laws, Chapter 6, §§ 22-25.] 

Commissioner, Charles N. Collates, Lexington, 1967. Deputy, Joseph 

P. Mayo, Hingham, 1965; Second Deputy, Raymond C. O'Brien, 

Stoneham, 1965. Supervisor of Benefits, Susan McCusker, Cambridge, 

1964. Ford Hall, 15 Ashburton Place, Boston. 

Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States. 
Headquarters, Department of Massachusetts, Room 71, State House. 

Veterinary Medicine, Board of Registration in (Department 

OF Civil Service and Registration). 

[General Laws, Chapter 13, §§ 26-28.] 

Matthew K. Carr {Chairman) , Hingham, 1964; Thomas J. O'Brien 
{Secretary), Taunton, 1965; E. Deane Freitas, Dartmouth, 1966; 
Howard A. Smith, Lexington, 1967; Alvin Kaplan, Arlington, 1968. 
Room 33, State House. 

Approving Authority for Colleges or Universities in Veterinary Medi- 
cine, Thomas J. O'Brien {Secretary), Natick; Edward M. Dwyer {Di- 
rector of Division of Livestock Disease Control), Boston. 

Wachusett Mountain State Reservation Commission. 
[Acts 1899, Chapter 378.] 
Kenneth G. Trinder. Shrewsbury, 1963; Frank W. Liberatore, Fitch- 
burg, 1965; Charles B. Campbell, Worcester, 1968. Superintendent, 
Earle R. Vickery, Jr., Princeton. 

Walden Pond State Reservation Commission. 
[Acts 1922, 499.] 
The County Commissioners of the County of Middlesex. Chairman, 
Thomas B. Brennan, Court House, Cambridge. 



Departments, Divisions, etc. 437 



War Records. Commissioner on. 
[General Laws, Chapter 6, § 16.] 
The Adjutant General. Room 184, State House. 

Weather Amendment Board. 
[General Laws, Chapter 6, § 72.] 
Commissioner of Agriculture, Commissioner of Public Health and 
Commissioner of Natural Resources. 

Woods Hole, Martha's Vineyard and Nantucket Steamship 
Authority. 
[Acts 1960, 701.] 
Frank E. McLean, Woods Hole (Chairman) (appointed by the Select- 
men of the town of Falmouth); Tell Berma, Nantucket (Vice-Chairman) 
(appointed by the Selectmen of the town of Nantucket); Robert M. Love, 
Vineyard Haven (Secretary) (appointed by the Commissioner of Dukes 
County); Frank B. Look, (Treasurer). P. O. Box 284, Woods Hole. 

Division of Youth Service. 
[General Laws, Chapter 6, §§ 65-69B.] 
Director, John D. Coughlan. 

* Youth Service Board. 

Members of the Board — Thomas J. Turley, Boston, 1963; John D. 
Coughlan (Chairman), Melrose, 1964; Cecelia McGovern, Chestnut 
Hill. 1965. Room 708, 14 Somerset Street, Boston. 

Advisory Committee on Service to Youth, Elaine A. Dray, Deerfield, 
1964; Agnes C. Lavery, Boston, 1964; John W. Roberts, Boston, 
1964; (vacancy), 1964; Harold H. WiUiams (Vice-Chairman), West 
Yarmouth, 1964; George A. Cashman, Newburyport, 1966; Edgar 
Grossman, Newton Center, 1966; Alice L. Halligan, Springfield, 
1966; John R. Mullen, Quincy, 1966; Rev. William H. Roche. Bos- 
ton, 1966; Edythe T. Cataloni, Mansfield, 1968; Frederick F. Fahey 
(Chairman), Dalton, 1968; James R. Goonan, Jr., Kingston, 1968; 
Dr. Bert E. Grove. Webster. 1968; Frank J. Walters, Jr., Water- 
town, 1968. 14 Somerset Street. Boston. 

Institutions under the Youth Service Board, Lyman School for Boys, 
Westborough. Industrial School for Boys. Shirley. Industrial School 
for Girls. Lancaster. Reception-Detention Center for Girls, Boston. 
Institute for Juvenile Guidance, South Bridgewater. Reception-De- 
tention Facility for Boys, 450 Canterbury Street, Boston. Residential 
Treatment Unit, Oakdale. Hampden County Detention Center, West- 
field. Worcester County Detention Center, Worcester. Stephen L. 
French Youth Forestry Camp, Brewster. 



438 State Institutions. 



AGRICULTURAL SCHOOLS. 

[General Laws, Chapter 74, §§ 25-27.] 



BRISTOL COUNTY AGRICULTURAL SCHOOL, TRUSTEES 

OF THE. 

At Dighton. 

Joseph R. Silvia, Dighton, 1964; Marinus VanderPol, Fairhaven, 
1965; Harold A. Goff, Rehoboth, 1966; Clinton W. Lush, Seekonk, 
1967; and the County Commissioners. Director, John B. Farrar. 



ESSEX AGRICULTURAL AND TECHNICAL INSTITUTE, 

TRUSTEES OF THE 

At Danvers (Hathorne P.O.). 

Thomas J. Zak, Salem, 1964; James D. McNamara, Lynnfield, 1965; 
George J. O'Shea, Lynn, 1966; Donald R. Driscoll, Haverhill, 1967; 
and the County Commissioners. Director, James F. Gallant. 



NORFOLK COUNTY AGRICULTURAL SCHOOL, TRUSTEES 

OF THE. 

At Walpole. 

John F. Sheehan, South Weymouth, 1964; Clayton \V. Nash, South 
Weymouth, 1965; Russell T. Bates, Quincy, 1965; Charles W. Kemp, 
Walpole, 1965; Isadore L. Kovey, Stoughton, 1966; John F. Murphy, 
Braintree, 1967; Edward J. Delaney, Walpole, 1967; and the County 
Commissioners. Director, Foster H. Weiss. 



State Institutions. 439 

INSTITUTIONS UNDER THE GENERAL SUPER- 
VISION OF THE COMMISSIONER OF 
CORRECTION. 

[General Laws, Chapter 27.] 



[The Commissioner has the government of the institutions named 
below, and appoints the Superintendent in each place.] 

MASSACHUSETTS CORRECTIONAL INSTITUTION, 
WALPOLE. 
(South Walpole P.O.) 
Superintendent, John A. Gavin. Deputy Superintendent, Palmer C. 
Scafati. 

MASSACHUSETTS CORRECTIONAL INSTITUTION, 
CONCORD. 
(West Concord P.O.) 
Superintendent, Edward S. Grennan. Deputy Superintendent, Samuel 
L. Freeman. 

MASSACHUSETTS CORRECTIONAL INSTITUTION, 
FR.\MINGHAM. 

Superintendent, Mrs. Betty Cole Smith. Deputy Superintendent, 
Pauline J. Orsi. 

MASSACHUSETTS CORRECTIONAL INSTITUTION, 
BRIDGEWATER. 
(South Bridgewater P.O.) 
Superintendent, Charles \V. Gaughan. Deputy Superintendent, Michael 
Sullivan. 

MASSACHUSETTS CORRECTIONAL INSTITUTION, 
NORFOLK. 
Superintendent, Jeremiah J. Dacey. Deputy Superintendent, Philip 
J. Picard. 

MASSACHUSETTS CORRECTIONAL INSTITUTION, 
PLYMOUTH. 
(Box 207, South Carver P.O.) 
Supervisor of Prison Camps. Edward J. Dunn. 

MASS.A.CHUSETTS CORRECTIONAL INSTITUTION. 
MONROE. 
(R.F.D. 52, Readsboro, Vermont P.O.) 
Supervisor of Prison Camps, Melvin H. Dinsmore. 



440 State Institutions, 



INSTITUTIONS UNDER THE GENERAL SUPER- 
VISION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF 
EDUCATION. 



[The general management of the several State Colleges is vested by 
statute in the Department of Education, and all money appropriated 
for their maintenance is expended under its direction.] 

At Boston — Opened as Boston Normal School, 1852; name changed 
to Boston Teachers' College, 1924; transferred to the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts, 1952. President — William F. Looney. 

At Framingham (for women only) — Opened at Lexington, July, 
1839; transferred to West Newton, September, 1844; removed to 
Framingham, 1853. President, D. Justin McCarthy. 

At Westfield — Opened at Barre, September, 1839; suspended, 
1841; reopened at Westfield, September, 1844. President, Leonard 
J. Savignano. 

At Bridge-water — Opened September, 1840. President, Adrian 
Rondileau. 

At Salem — Opened September, 1854. President, Frederick A. 
Meier. 

At Worcester — Opened September, 1874. President, Eugene A. 
Sullivan. 

At Fitchburg — Opened September, 1895. President, James J. 
Hammond. 

At North Adams — Opened February, 1897. President, Eugene L. 
Freel. 

At Lowell — O^&n&A October, 1897. President, Daniel H. O'Leary. 



MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGE OF ART. 
At Boston — Opened November, 1873. President, Robert L. BertoIIi. 



FALL RIVER. THE BRADFORD DURFEE COLLEGE OF 
TECHNOLOGY, TRUSTEES OF. 
[General Laws, Chapter 15, § 21.] 
President — William J. Holland. 

Trustees — The Mayor; the Commissioner of Education; the 
Superintendent of Schools. 

Octave O. Desmarais, Sr., Fall River, 1963; Tobias M. Furtado, 
Fall River, 1963; Matthew J. Kuss, Fall River, 1963; Francis T. 
Meagher, Fall River {Chairman), 1963; William H. Moran, Fall River, 



State Institutions. 441 



1963; Wilfred C. Driscoll, Fall River {Vice Chairman), 1964; Em- 
manuel Gittelman, Somerset, 1964; Charles P. Mullen, Westport, 
1964; Edward S. Bliss, Fall River, 1964; Albert G. Pierce, Westport, 
1964; Manuel H. Camara, Jr.. Fall River, 1965; Ruth B. Merritt, 
Fall River, 1965; Stephen Nawrocki, Fall River, 1965; John A. Shea, 
Taunton. 1965; Joseph F. Noverca, Jr.. Fall River, 1965. 



LOWELL TECHNOLOGICAL INSTITUTE OF MASSA- 
CHUSETTS, TRUSTEES OF THE. 
[General Laws, Chapter 15, § 24.] 

President — Martin J, Lydon. 

Trustees — The Mayor; the Commissioner of Education. 

Samuel Pfnanski {Chairman), Brookline, 1963; Doran S. Lyons 
{Vice Chairman), Lowell, 1963; Frank W. Gainey, Lawrence, 1963; 
Alvan R. Benjamin, Boston, 1963; Ralph K. Hubbard, Webster, 
1963; John J. Delmore, Lowell, 1964; Joseph A. DeMambro, Chest- 
nut Hill, 1964; Clifford L. Erving, Milton, 1964; Barnett D. Gordon, 
Chestnut Hill, 1964; Albert P. Manzi, Methuen, 1964; Homer W. 
Bourgeois, Lowell, 1965; Thomas T. Clark, Andover, 1965; Harold W. 
Leitch, Andover, 1965; Francis P. Madden, Marblehead, 1965; 
Timothy F. Meehan, Lowell, 1965. 



NEW BEDFORD INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, 
TRUSTEES OF THE. 
[General Laws, Chapter 15, § 21.] 

President — John E. Foster. 

Trustees — The Mayor; the Commissioner of Education; the Super- 
intendent of Schools. 

Joseph M. Souza {Chairman), New Bedford, 1963; George E. 
Carignan {Vice Chairman), New Bedford, 1963; Francis P. Delaney, 
New Bedford, 1963; Dr. John B. O'Toole, Jr., New Bedford, 1963; 
Lydia B. Nunes, New Bedford, 1963; Nils V. Nelson, Winthrop, 1964; 
Milton Gollis, New Bedford, 1964; John Vertente, Jr.. New Bedford, 
1964; Walter Smietana, New Bedford, 1964; Joseph Dawson, Jr., 
South Dartmouth, 1964; Beatrice P. Thomas, Fairhaven, 1965; 
Serafira E. Mello, New Bedford. 1965; Alfred J. Gomes, New Bedford, 
1965; James F. Francis, New Bedford, 1965; Waldo E. Haydon, Fair- 
haven, 1965. 



442 State Institutions. 

SOUTHEASTERN MASSACHUSETTS TECHNOLOGICAL IN- 
STITUTE, TRUSTEES OF. 
[General Laws, Chapter 15, § 21 A, inserted by 1960, 543.] 

Joseph M. Souza, New Bedford, 1963; James Holt, Duxbury. 1963; 
William S. Lynch, Fall River, 1963; Francis T. Meagher, Fall River, 
1963; {vacancy), 1963; George Gordon, Falmouth, 1964; Leonard 
Pacheco, Mattapoisett. 1964; Edward Harrington, Jr., New Bedford, 
1964; James Pilkington, Westport, 1964; George E. Carignan, New 
Bedford, 1965; Albert G. Hamel, New Bedford, 1965; Wilfred C. 
Driscoll. Fall River, 1965; William F. Carney, North Dartmouth, 1965; 
Charles E. Sharek, Dartmouth, 1965. Ex officio: Commissioner of 
Education. 

President — Joseph L. Driscoll. 



MASSACHUSETTS MARITIME ACADEMY, COMMIS- 
SIONERS OF THE. ^ 
[General Laws, Chapter 15, §§ 22, 23.] 
Francis J. Couble, Brockton, 1963; Arthur C. Sullivan, Boston, 
1964; Leonard A. Kelley, Scituate, 1965; Seraphine P. Jason, Fair- 
haven, 1966; Howard W. Nickerson, New Bedford, 1967. 419 Boylston 
Street, Boston. 

Superintendent, Shore Base, Buzzards Bay — Rear Admiral John W. 
Thompson. 

UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS. 
[At Amherst. Founded 1863.] 
[General Laws, Chapter 15, § 20.] 
President — John W. Lederle. 

Trustees — Ernest Hoftyzer, Marion. 1964; Alden C. Brett, Belmont, 
1964; J. John Fox. Boston, 1965; Victoria Schuck, South Hadley, 1965; 
Dennis M. Crowley, Boston, 1966; Kathryn F. Furcolo, Chestnut 
Hill, 1966; George L. Pumphret, Dorchester, 1967; Frank L. Boyden 
{Chairman), Deerfield, 1967; Harry Dunlap Brown, North Chatham, 
1968; John W. Haigis. Jr., Greenfield. 1968; Hugh Thompson, 1969; 
Most Rev. Christopher J. Weldon, Springfield. 1969; Fred C. Emerson, 
Agawam. 1969; Edmund J. Croce, Worcester, 1969; Calvin H. 
Plimpton, Amherst, 1969; Joseph P. Healey. Arlington. 1970; Fred- 
erick S. Troy. Boston. 1970. 

Trustees Ex officiis — His Excellency the Governor; the Commis- 
sioner of Education; the Commissioner of Agriculture; the President 

of the University. „.. ^ ,, t^ , 

Officers of the Trustees. 

President — His Excellency the Governor, Ex officio. 

Chairman — Frank L. Boyden. 

Secretary — Dr. John W. Ryan, Amherst. 

Treasurer — Kenneth W. Johnson, Amherst. 



State Institutions. 443 



INSTITUTIONS UNDER THE GENERAL SUPER- 

VISION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF 

MENTAL HEALTH. 



[The board of trustees for each of the following institutions, except 
the \^'alter E. Fernald State School, shall consist of seven members; 
and at least two of such members shall be women. The board of 
trustees of the Walter E. Fernald State School shall consist of six 
members on the part of the Commonwealth (General Laws, Chapter 
19, § § 5 and 6).] 

BELCHERTOWN STATE SCHOOL. 

Trustees — Ernest DesLauriers, Ware, 1964; Muriel Klein, West 
Springfield, 1965; Samuel Rodman, Jr., Granby, 1966; Oliver 
Lameroux, Holyoke, 1967; Barbara M. Putnam, Wilbraham, 1968; 
Frank Anzalotti, Longmeadow, 1969; Louise W. Giles, Longmeadow, 
1970. 

Superintendent — Lawrence Bowser, M.D. 



MASSACHUSETTS MENTAL HEALTH CENTER 
(BOSTON PSYCHOPATHIC HOSPITAL). 
Trustees — Benjamin Finn, Boston, 1984; Morris A. Cohen, Bel- 
mont, 1965; Winslow Sears, Boston, 1966; Catherine P. Lally, Swamp- 
scott, 1967; Harry Halperin, Boston, 1968; Irene K. Thresher, New- 
ton, 1969; Anne B. Saval, Boston, 1970. 
Superintendent — Jack R. Ewalt, M.D. 



BOSTON STATE HOSPITAL. 

Trustees — Feter Di Natale, Milton, 1964; Hon. Leo P. Doherty, 
Belmont, 1965; Elaine Dobrowski, Boston, 1966; Elihu I. Lewis, 
Newton, 1967; Wilfred Scott. Boston, 1968; Harry Schlesinger, Bos- 
ton, 1969; Sarah Frances Gordon, Boston, 1970. 

Superintendent — Milton Greenblatt, M.D. 



GUSHING HOSPITAL. 

Trustees — Fillipo Ottaviani, Framingham, 1964; Frances E. Smith, 
Boston, 1965; Mario R. Carbone, Belmont, 1966; Charles C. O'Don- 
nell, Lynn, 1967; William E. Blizard, Framingham, 1968; (vacancy), 
1969; Miriam A. McCourt, Spencer, 1970. 

Superintendent — J. Sanbourne Bockoven, M.D. 



444 State Institutions. 



DANVERS STATE HOSPITAL. 

Trustees — Elizabeth W. McNulty, Danvers, 1964; James W. 
O'Donnell, Winchester, 1965; Robert V. O'Sullivan, Methuen, 1966; 
Pasquale Grillo, Lawrence, 1967; Dorothy Stevens, North Andover, 
1968; Roy K. Patch, Beverly. 1969; Edward Ray, Jr., Lynn. 1970. 

Superintendent — Peter B. Hagopian, M.D. 



WALTER E. FERNALD STATE SCHOOL. 
At Waltham 

Trustees — Frederick J. Mahony, Nev,-ton, 1964; Joseph J. Bradley, 
Belmont, 1965; Dorothea A. Holland, Belmont, 1966; John L Ahern, 
Newton, 1967; L. Sheldon Crockett, Wenham, 1968. 

Superintendent — Malcolm J. Farrell, M.D. 

Trustees elected by Corporation — Charles M. Austin, Somerville; 
John E. Rogerson, Boston; Thornton K. Ware, Fitchburg; Paul R. 
Withington, Milton; Henry B. Mayo, Jr.. Lynn; Mary W. Barnes, 
Cambridge. 



FOXBOROUGH STATE HOSPITAL. 

Trustees — Daniel A. J. Doyle, Taunton, 1964; William F. Maguire, 
Randolph, 1965; Helen J. Fay, Westwood, 1966; {vacancy), 1967; 
Ethel Wing Dodd, Wrentham, 1968; Eugene Costa, Attleboro, 1969; 
Vincent Igo, Foxborough, 1970. 

Superintendent — John T. Shea, M.D. 



GARDNER STATE HOSPITAL. 

Trustees — Howard D. Ferguson. Gardner. 1963; Marjorie A. Mich- 
niewicz, Worcester, 1964; Helen F. Cummings. Brookline, 1965; 
Nathan Parnes, Gardner, 1966; Ralph W. Kelley, Gardner, 1967; 
Magnus A. Carlberg, Gardner. 1968; Albert A. Gammal, Jr., Worces- 
ter. 1969. 

Superintendent — Warren P. Cordes, M.D. 



GRAFTON STATE HOSPITAL. 

Trustees — Antonia W. Wackell, Worcester, 1964; Marion F. 
Lonergan, Worcester, 1965; Frank J. Ludy. Jr.. North Grafton. 1966; 
WiUiam Fields, Grafton, 1967; Irene M. Pusateri, Worcester, 1968; 
Edith F. Johnson, Grafton, 1969; Harry E. Hicks, Jr., Auburn, 1970. 

Superintendent — Wm. Charles Inman, M.D. 



State Institutions. 445 

MEDFIELD STATE HOSPITAL. 

Trustees — Dr. Curtis Prout, Dover, 1964; Patrick J. Butler, 
Framingham, 1965; Charles Burrows, Norfolk, 1966; Glee Cahill, 
Milford, 1967; Nathaniel Thayer Clark, Dover, 1968; Andrew B. 
Goodspeed, Boston, 1969; Margaret M. Vasatiuro, Medfield, 1970. 

Superintendent — Theodore F. Lindberg, M.D. 



METROPOLITAN STATE HOSPITAL. 
At Waltham. 
Trustees — Gertrude Scheft, Newton, 1964; Solomon L. Skvirsky, 
Brookline, 1965; Susan Murdock Tully, Stoneham, 1966; John S. 
Rando, Waltham, 1967; Harry Bromstein, Brookline, 1968; J. Thomas 
Baldwin, Quincy, 1969; Marie Andrews, Watertown, 1970. 
Superintendent — William F. McLaughlin, M.D. 



MONSON STATE HOSPITAL. 
At Palmer. 
Trustees — Mary E. O'Connor, Springfield, 1964; James F. McCon- 
chie, Monson, 1965; Samuel Goldstein, Newton, 1966; Thomas J. 
Legere, Sr., Arlington, 1967; Americo A. Calderigi, Springfield, 1968; 
Beatrice V. M. Buckley, Ware, 1969; Michael J. Cavanaugh, Palmer, 
1970. 

Superintendent — Roger G. Osterheld, M.D. 



NORTHAMPTON STATE HOSPITAL. 

Trustees — Raymond Cross, Northampton, 1963; Francis M. Mc- 
Kenna, Springfield, 1964; Barney Carlson, Northampton, 1965; Henry 
G. Clarke, Florence, 1966; Une V. Barsalow, Holyoke, 1967; Victoria 
F. Krausher, Northampton, 1968; Roger Slawson, Northampton, 1969. 

Superintendent — Harry Goodman, M.D. 



PAUL A. DEVER STATE SCHOOL. 
At Taunton. 
Trustees — Helen L. Buckley, Abington, 1964; Mae Brooks, North 
Easton, 1965; John E. Fenton, Lawrence, 1966; Francis J. Sullivan, 
Taunton, 1967; Abraham Naterman, Newton, 1968; Nicholas Spadea, 
Brockton, 1969; Thomas P. Fallon, Watertown, 1970. 
Superintendent — {vacancy). 



446 State Institutions. 

TAUNTON STATE HOSPITAL. 

Trustees — James P. Boland, Fall River, 1964; Thomas J. Clancy, 
Swansea, 1965; Amy M. Robinson, Taunton, 1966; Alice T. Knowles, 
Dartmouth, 1967; Dorothy G. Williams, Taunton, 1968; Kenneth 
Dorn, Brockton, 1969; William Benevides, Dighton, 1970. 

Superintendent — W. Everett Glass, M.D. 



WESTBOROUGH STATE HOSPITAL. 

Trustees — Mary Burke Cronan, Framingham, 1964; Catherine J. 
Razzano, Worcester, 1965; John T. Sheehan, Westborough, 1966; 
Mary E. Murray, Milford, 1967; Norman F. Wellen, Marlborough, 
1968; EUwood N. Hennessy, Westborough, 1969; Grace Pendergast, 
Berlin, 1970. 

Superintendent — Morris L. Sharp, M.D. 



WORCESTER STATE HOSPITAL. 

Trustees — Mary V. Campbell, Worcester, 1964; Daniel F. Murray, 
Millbury, 1965; Flora Lane, Spencer, 1966; Arthur A. Porcaro, 
Worcester, 1967; Margaret Ford, Worcester, 1968; Carl G. Xord- 
gren, Worcester, 1969; Alfred J. Cotton, Worcester, 1970. 

Superintendent — Bardwell H. Flower, M.D. 



WRENTHAM STATE SCHOOL. 

Trustees — Margaret Delaney, Newton, 1964; Frank J. Carroll, 
Canton, 1965; John J. Clancy, BeUingham, 1966; Grace E. Supple, 
Wrentham, 1967; Inez Pini, North Attleborough, 1968; Corodan S. 
Fuller, Foxborough, 1969; John F. Sheehan, Wrentham, 1970. 

Superintendent — Edward Meshorer, M.D. 



State Institutions. 447 



INSTITUTIONS UNDER THE GENERAL SUPER- 
VISION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF 
PUBLIC HEALTH. 

[General Laws, Chapter 111.] 



RUTLAND STATE SANATORIUM. 
Superintendent — Paul Dufault, M.D. 



LAKEVILLE STATE SANATORIUM. 
Superintendent — George L. Parker, M.D. 



LEMUEL SHATTUCK HOSPITAL. 
Superintendent — William H. H. Turville, M.D. 



MASSACHUSETTS HOSPITAL SCHOOL. 
At Canton. 
[For the care and education of crippled and deformed children.] 
Trustees — Linwood L. Chaflfin, Mansfield, 1964; Nils V. Nelson, 
Winthrop, 1965; Paul L. Norton (Chairman), Lincoln, 1966; A. Walter 
Ciani. M.D., Quincy, 1967; Edward T. Clark, Randolph, 1968. 
Superintendent — John J. Carroll, M.D. 



WESTERN MASSACHUSETTS HOSPITAL. 
Superintendent — Roland R. Cartier. M.D. 



PONDVILLE HOSPITAL (FOR CANCER PATIENTS). 
Superintendent — Claire W. Twinam, M.D. 



TEWKSBURY HOSPITAL. 
[General Laws, Chapter 122.] 
Trustees — Lillian Critchett, Lowell, 1963; Clement G. McDonough, 
Lowell, 1964; Ruth M. Anderson, Tewksbury, 1964; Charles Chigas, 
Billerica, 1964; Ernest C. Sullivan {Chairman), Lowell, 1965; David 
G. McKenna, Billerica, 1965; John E. Sheehy, Reading, 1965. 
Superintendent — Thomas J. Saunders. 



448 Various Institutions. 



VARIOUS INSTITUTIONS. 

BRISTOL COUNTY TUBERCULOSIS HOSPITAL. 

At Attleboro. [General Laws, Chapter 111, § 87A.] 

Trustees — Rev. Francis McKeon, Taunton, 1964; Clarence D. Roberts, 
Attleboro, 1965; Frederick H. Miller, Norton, 1966. 
Superintendent and Secretary — Garnet Smith, M.D. 

MASSACHUSETTS GENERAL HOSPITAL. 

At Boston. [Acts 1864, Chapter 46.] 

Trustees — Robert P. Barry, Somerville, 1964; Sidney R. Rabb, Boston, 
1964; Francis O. Schmitt, Weston, 1964; H. Brooks Beck, Canton, 1964. 
General Director — John H. Knowles, M.D. 

PERKINS SCHOOL FOR THE BLIND. 

At Watertown. [Acts 1864, Chapter 96.] 

Trustees — Roland M. Achin, Lowell, 1964; Marshall M. Sloane, New- 
ton, 1964; Carol Weinberg, Newton, 1964; Bertram A. Druker, Newton, 
1964. 

Director — Edward J. Waterhouse. 

MASSACHUSETTS EYE AND EAR INFIRMARY. 

At Boston. [Acts 1873, Chapter 134.] 

Mayiagers — Kathryn Foran Furcolo, Longmeadow, 1963; Grace S. 
Dane, Brookline, 1963. 

Director — Francis S. Hill. 

* SOLDIERS' HOME IN HOLYOKE, TRUSTEES OF THE. 

At Holyoke. [General Laws, Chapter 6, §§ 70, 71. j 

Trustees — Cyril P. McQueen, Pittsfield, 1963; Elizabeth J. G'Leary, 

Springfield, 1964; Walter F. Stachowicz, Springfield, 1965; James P. Kelly 

{Chairman), Holyoke, 1966; Owen W. Dunphy, South Hadley, 1967; 

Robert H. Bourassa, Holyoke, 1968; H. Perry Chandler, Westfield, 1969. 

Superintendent — John P. Harrington, Springfield. 

♦SOLDIERS' HOME IN MASSACHUSETTS. 

At Chelsea. [General Laws, Chapter 6, §§ 40, 41.) 

TrM^/ees — Frederick C. Holland, Chelsea, 1964; Rt. Rev. Edward J. 
Carney, Lawrence, 1965; J. Leo Sullivan, Peabody, 1966; Leonard Flor- 
ence, Chelsea, 1967; Gustave W. Everberg, Woburn, 1968; Nicholas 
Scaramella, Boston, 1969; Frederick J. Sullivan, Chelsea, 1970. 
Commandant — John M. Quigley, Chelsea. 

MASSACHUSETTS MEMORIAL HOSPITALS. 

At Boston. [Acts 1890, Chapter 358.) 

Trustees — Florence R. Perini, Wellesley, 1963; Bernard Fenn, Belmont, 

1964; Frances G. Reith, Boston. 1964; Charles E. Dockser, Newton, 1965; 

Louis Mastrangelo, Watertown, 1965. 

Administrator — Philip D. Bonnet, M.D. 

PETER BENT BRIGHAM HOSPITAL. 

At Boston. [Acts 1909, Chapter 370.] 

Trustees — Lucy Brady, Newton, 1963; Dr. Jolane Solomon, Boston, 
1966. 

Director — F. Lloyd Mussells, M.D. 



LIST OF THE 



Executive and Legislative 
Departments 



OF THE 



GOVERNMENT 



OF 



trtje Commontoealtf) of i$las(£(acf)U£fett3S 

AND OFFICERS IMMEDIATELY CONNECTED THEREWITH 
WITH PLACES OF RESIDENCE 

1963-1964 



EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT. 



GOVERNOR. 



His Excellency, ENDICOTT PEABODY {D) 
of Cambridge. 

LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR. 

His Honor FRANCIS X. BELLOTTI {D) 
of Quincy. 



Council. 
District The Lieutenant-Governor. 

I. — Ernest C. Stasiun (Z>) of Fairhaven. 
n. — Margaret M. Heckler (R) of Wellesley. 
HI. — John W. Costello {D) of Boston. 
IV. — Patrick J. McDonough {D) of Boston. 
V. — John J. Buckley (P) of Lawrence. 
VI. — Joseph R. Crimmins (Z)) of Somerville. 
VII. — Walter F. Kelly {D) of Worcester. 
VIII. — Raymond F. Sullivan (D) of Springfield. 



Chief Secretary to tiie Governor. 

Joseph J. Donovan of Marshfield. 



Legislative Secretaries to Governor. 

Lawrence F. Feloney of Cambridge. 
James R. Lawton of Brockton. 



Executive Secretary to Council. 
James R. Purdy of Boston (Roxbury). 



452 Executive Department. 



Committees of the Council. 

Pardons and Prisons. — Lieutenant-Governor Francis X. Bellotti 
{Chairman), Patrick J. McDonough, Joseph R. Crimmins, John J. 
Buckley, Walter F. Kelly. 

Finance, Accounts and Warrants. — Lieutenant-Governor Francis X. 
Bellotti {Chairman), Raymond F. Sullivan, Ernest C. Stasiun, Walter 
F. Kelly, Margaret M. Heckler. 

Waterways, Public Lands and Transportation. — Joseph R. Crimmins 
{Chairman) , Margaret M. Heckler, John J. Buckley, Walter F. Kelly, 
John W. Costello. 

Public Institutions and State House. — Patrick J. McDonough {Chair- 
man), Margaret M. Heckler, Raymond F. Sullivan, Walter F. Kelly, 
Ernest C. Stasiun. 

Military and Naval Affairs. — Ernest C. Stasiun {Chairman), Walter 
F. Kelly, John W. Costello, John J. Buckley, Joseph R. Crimmins. 

Nominations. — Lieutenant-Governor Francis X. Bellotti {Chair- 
man), John W. Costello, Patrick J. McDonough, Raymond F. Sullivan, 
John J. Buckley. 

Military Establishment. 
His Excellency Endicott Peabody, Commander-in-Chief. 

Major Gen. Thomas J. Donnelly, The Adjutant General. 
Longmeadow. 

Chief of Aides-de-Camp of the 
Commander-in-Chief, 

Military Division. 

Maj. Gen. Thomas J. Donnelly, The Adjutant 

General ....... Longmeadow 

Brig. Gen. Richard E. McLaughUn, Executive Officer Cambridge 

Brig. Gen, Walter J. Gleason, Asst. Adjutant General West Roxbury 

Col. Joseph L. Madigan, Asst. Adjutant General . Arlington 

Col. Daniel J. Murphy, Jr., Asst. Adjutant General Natick 

Col. Peter Burnett, Asst. Adjutant General for Air Natick 
State Judge Advocate: 

Lt. Col. Frederick W. Roche, Mass ARNG . Belmont 
State Ordnance Officer: 

Lt. Col. Arthur J. O'Leary, Mass ARNG . Framingham 



Executive Department. 



453 



State Quartermaster: 

Col. Ralph T. Noonan, Mass ARNG . , Framingham 

State Surgeon: 

Col. Alfred L. Frechette, Mass ARNG . . Brookline 

U. S. Property and Fiscal Officer: 

Col. John F. Kane, Mass ARNG . . . Natick 

Military Service Commission: 

Maj. Gen. Thomas J. Donnelly, The Adjutant 

General ....... Longmeadow 

Army National Guard: 

Brig. Gen. Timothy J. Regan, Jr., Hq Mass 

A RNG Jamaica Plain 

Brig. Gen. Paul J. Mozzicato, Hq 104th Arty 

Bde Medford 

Col. Raymond A. Wilkinson, Hq 26th Inf Div 

Arty . . . . . . . Marblehead 

Air National Guard: 

Col. Edward H. Bradford, Hq Mass ANG . Belmont 
Col. Joseph M. Dunn, Hq 253d Comm Gp . Winchester 
Lt. Col. Sydney S. Kaplan, Hq 102d Tac Fir 

Wg ....... Newton 

The Massachusetts Military Academy: 
Commandant: 

Major General Vincent P. Coyne 
Assistant Commandant: 

Colonel Howard V. Elliott . 



Academic Board: 

Lt. Gen. Otis M. Whitney . 
Maj. Gen. Vincent P. Coyne 
Brig. Gen. William R. Porter 
Brig. Gen. Lawrence F. Carew 
Brig. Gen. Charles W. Sweeney 
Col. Howard V. Elliott 
Col. Edward F. Logan 
Col. John J. Pakula . 
Col. George E. Young 
Lt. Col. Russell W. Vinton 
Lt. Col. John J. Shields 



Jamaica Plain 

Arlington 

Concord 

Jamaica Plain 

Westboro 

Medford 

Milton 

Arlington 

Cohasset 

Worcester 

Southwick 

Shrewsbury 

North Adams 



454 



Executive Department. 



Commanders, Massachusetts National Guard, Army and Air. 



Hq & Hq Det Mass ARNG: Maj. Gen. Thomas J. 

Donnelly ....... 

101st Ord Co (DS): Capt. Howard E. Hallett . 
26th Inf Div: Maj. Gen. Richard V. Quigley 
101st Engr Bn: Lt. Col. Stanley W. Bishop 
126th Signal Bn: Lt. Col. Angelo J. Mantenuto . 
1st BG 101st Inf: Col. Edv.'ard F. Logan . 
1st BG 104th Inf: Col. George E. Young . 
1st BG 181st Inf: Col. John J. Pakula 
1st BG 182d Inf: Lt. Col. Harland M. Anderson . 
1st BG 220th Inf: Col. Howard V. Elliott . 
1st Med Tank Bn 110th Armor: Lt. Col. WiUiam 

A. Thompson ...... 

2d Recon Squadron 110th Armor: Lt. Col. Edgar 

R. Kay 

26th Inf Div Trains: Col. William J. Samborski . 
726th Ord Bn: Maj. Francis I. Weagle 
114th Med Bn: Col. Daniel D. Licata 
226th Trans Bn: Lt. Col. Archille R. Plette 
26th Inf Div Arty: Col. Raymond A. Wilkinson 
1st How Bn 101st Arty: Lt. Col. Henry B. Finch, 

Jr 

2d How Bn 101st Arty: Lt. Col. John H. Kingsley 
3d Rkt How Bn 101st Arty: Lt. Col. Charles W. 

Passales ....... 

1st How Bn 102d Arty: Lt. Col. Joseph M. 

Ambrose ....... 

2d How Bn 102d Arty: Maj. James A. Daley 
3d How Bn 102d Arty: Lt. Col. Henry B. Mauti 
104th Arty Bde: Brig. Gen. Paul J. Mozzicato . 
211th Arty Gp: Lt. Col. John J. Hagenbuch 
1st Msl Bn 241st Arty: Lt. Col. James P. Butler 
2d Msl Bn 241st Arty: Lt. Col. Francis G. Har- 
rington ....... 

241st Engr Bn: Lt. Col. Harold J. Ball 

i02d Arty Gp: Col. Richard C. Carrera 

1st How Bn 211th Arty: Lt. Col. John R. Kinney 

2d How Bn 211th Arty: Lt. Col. James E. Attaya 

3d How Bn 211th Arty: Maj. William A. Barter 

4th How Bn 211th Arty: Lt. Col. William R. 

Marion ....... 



Longmeadow 

Littleton 

Wollaston 

\^'altham 

Needham 

Cohasset 

Southwick 

Worcester 

Saugus 

Arlington 

Chelsea 

Lowell 

Holden 

Hudson 

Wakefield 

Leominster 

IMarblehead 

Allston 
Salem 

Ipswich 

Danvers 

Lynn 

Chelmsford 

Medford 

Watertown 

Norwood 

Lynn 
Wakefield 
New Bedford 
New Bedford 
Roslindale 
New Bedford 

Harwich 



Executive Department, 



455 



164th Trans Bn: Lt. Col. John J. Shields. Jr. . North Adams 

181st Engr Bn: Lt. Col. Russell W. Vinton . Shrewsbury 

109th Signal Bn: Lt. Col. Daniel J. Manning, Jr. Northampton 

Hq Mass ANG: Brig. Gen. Joseph P. Gentile . Medford 

102d Tac Ftr Wg: Brig. Gen. Charles W. Sweeney Milton 

102d Tac Ftr Gp: Lt. Col. Ralph E. Leader . Needham 

101st Tac Ftr Sq: Maj. James R. Ramsay, Jr. . Hingham 

101st Wea Fit: Maj. Paul G. Yochum . . Lynnfield 

102d Materiel Sq: Lt. Col. Aldo O. Napolitano . Canton 

102d Combat Support Sq: Lt. Col. John L. Brown Milton 

102d Tac Hosp: Col (MC) William F. Croskery . Milton 

104th Tac Ftr Gp: Col. John J. SLefanik . . Chicopee 

131st Tac Ftr Sq: Lt. Col. Francis L. Sullivan . West Springfield 

131st Wea Fit: Maj. Russell C. Sails . . Wilbraham 

104th Materiel Sq: Lt. Col. Walter J. Charow . Wellesley 

104th Combat Support Sq: Lt. Col. John L. Brown Milton 

104th USAF Disp: Maj. (MC) Philip B. Burke . Holden 

253d Comm Gp: Col. Joseph M. Dunn . . Winchester 

267th Comm Sq: Lt. Col. Finley R. Mahoney . Hyde Park 

212th GEEIA Sq: Maj. Henry P. Laviolette . Worcester 

101st AC&W Fit: Lt. Col. Ernest O. Lindblom . Boylston 



456 Executive Department. 

Secretary of the Commonwealth. 

Kevin H. White (D) of Boston. 

Edward T. Sullivan, Boston (Jamaica Plain), First Deputy, Room 340, 

State House. 
Joseph J. Twiss, Boston, Administrative Assistant, Room 340. 
Thomas J. Joyce, Boston (Dorchester), Third Deputy, Room 272. 
Theodore V. Anzalone, Boston, Director of Corporations, Room 130. 
Richard W. Hale, Newton, Archivist of Commonwealth, Room 49. 
Mary A. R. Hines, Lynn, Commissions Clerk, Room 337. 
James F. Kane, Chelsea, Supervisor of Public Records, Room 136. 
Raymond D. Lavallee, Marlboro, Registrar of Vital Statistics, Room 272. 
W. Lawrence McNeil, Medford, Census Director, Room 340. 
Elizabeth D. Sheridan, Boston (Dorchester), Head Administrative Clerk, 

Engrossing Division, Room 337A. 
William F, SuUivan, Haverhill, Supervisor of Elections, Room 136. 
Julius Vexler, Brookline, Supervisor of Public Documents, Room 1 16. 

Treasurer and Receiver-General. 
John T. Driscoll (D) of Boston (Dorchester). 
George F. Killgoar, Deputy Treasurer and Receiver- 
General ....... Belmont 

John W. Francis, Second Deputy .... Boston 

(Dorchester) 
Lawrence E. Sullivan, Third Deputy . . . Boston 

(Roslindale) 
Robert G. Smith, Head Bookkeeper . . . Westwood 

Donal P. Frary, Paying Teller .... Boston 

(Dorchester) 
John P. O'Toole, Receiving Teller .... Boston 

(Dorchester) 
Auditor of the Commonwealth. 

Thomas J. Buckley (D) of Boston. 
Herbert M. Eveleth, First Deputy Auditor . . Maiden 

Albert M. Pacifice, Second Deputy Auditor . . Boston 

Attorney-General. 
Edward W. Brooke (R) of Boston. 

Assistants. 

Samuel Adams ....... Manchester 

George W. Arvanitis ...... Lawrence 

James W. Bailey ...... Boston 



Executive Department. 



457 



Aileen H. Belford 










. Fall River 


Paull M. Cushman 








. Raynham 


Jay L. Fialkow . 








. Newton 


Benjamin Gargill 








Boston 


S. Jason Ginsburg 








. Newton 


James J. Kelleher 








Boston 


Lee H. Kozol 








. \^•ellesley 


Gael Mahony 








. Boston 


Edward T. Martin 








. Lexington 


Glendora J. Mcllwain . 








. Methuen 


Paul F. X. Powers 








. Waltham 


Harold B. Putnam, Jr. 








. Needham 


Theodore Regnante, Sr. 








. Lynn 


Paul B. Sargent . 








. Gloucester 


Walter J. Skinner 








. Scituate 


Edward M. Swartz 








Brookline 


Herbert F. Travers. Jr. 








. Holden 


Herbert E. Tucker. Jr. 








Boston 


David L. Turner 








. Norwell 


Assigned to Division of Employment Security 




Joseph S. Ayoub .... 


Boston 


Roger H. Woodworth .... 


. Norwood 


Assigned to Metropolitan District Commission: 


Richard A. Hunt Braintree 


John Wright Milton 


Assigned to Department of Public Works: 


Robert A. Belmonte Framingham 


Burton F. Berg . 










Worcester 


John S. Bottomly 










Wellesley 


Frank H. Freedman 










Springfield 


James N. Gabriel 










Cambridge 


John J. Grigalus . 










Boston 


Victor L. Hatem 










Methuen 


Foster Herman . 










No. Dartmouth 


Rudolph A. Sacco 










Pittsfield 


Salvatore F. Straraondo 










Lexington 


Fred D. Vincent, Jr. . 










Ipswich 


Henry G. Weaver 










Cambridge 


Assigned to Veterans' Division: 


Donald W. Whitehead 




. 






Stoughton 



458 



Senate, Alphabetically. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



V 

I 



SENATE, ALPHABETICALLY. 



Ames, Oliver F. 
Benoit, Paul H. 

Bisbee, Charles A,, Jr. 

Burke, James F. . 
Conte, John J, 
Cutler, Leslie B. . 
Delia Russo, Harry. 
Donahue, Maurice A. 
Fleming, William D. 
Fonseca, Mary L. . 
Foster, A. Frank . 
Galvin, Michael J. 
Gibney, Joseph F. 
Graham. Philip A. 
Hammond, George D. 

Harrington, John E., Jr. 
Harrington, Kevin B. 
Hays, William E. . 
Hennigan, James W,, Jr 
Hogan, Charles V. 
Holmes, Newland H. 



Third Suffolk District. 

Worcester and Hampden Dis- 
trict. 

Franklin and Hampshire DiS' 
trict. 

Plymouth District. 

Second Worcester District. 

Norfolk and Middlesex District. 

First Suffolk District. 

Second Hampden District. 

First Worcester District. 

Second Bristol District. 

Sixth Suffolk District. 

Norfolk and Suffolk District. 

Fourth Worcester District. 

Third Essex District. 

Hampden and Berkshire Dis- 
trict. 

First Middlesex District. 

Second Essex District. 

Fifth Middlesex District. 

Fifth Suffolk District. 

First Essex District. 

Norfolk and Plymouth Dis- 
trict. 



Senate, Alphabetically. 



459 



Jones, Allan F. 
Kenneally, George V., Jr. 
Lamson, Fred 
Long, James J. 
McCann, Francis X. 
McCormack, James S. . 
McKenna, Denis L. 
Olson, Charles W. 

Parker, John F. . 
Pellegrini, Philibert L. . 
Powers, John E., President 
Rurak, James P. . 
Silva, Antone L. . 
St. John, Edmund R.. Jr. 
Sullivan, George A., Jr. . 
Umana, Mario 
Wall, William X. . 
Ward, Joseph D. . 
Zarod, Stanley J. . 



. Cape and Plymouth District. 

. Seventh Suffolk District. 

. Fourth Middlesex District. 

. Seventh Middlesex District. 

. Second Middlesex District. 

. First Norfolk District. 

. Third Middlesex District. 

. Middlesex and Worcester Dis- 
trict. 

. First Bristol District. 

. Sixth Middlesex District. 

. Fourth Suffolk District. 

. Fourth Essex District. 

. Third Bristol District. 

. Berkshire District. 

. Second Norfolk District. 

. Second Suffolk District. 

. Fifth Essex District. 

. Third Worcester District. 

. First Hampden District. 



460 



Senate, by Districts. 



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Senate, by Districts. 461 



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462 



Senate, by Districts. 



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Senate, by Districts. 



463 



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464 



Seating Arrangement of the Senate. 



SEATING ARRANGEMENT OF THE SENATE. 



Hon. JOHN E. POWERS. President. 





On President's Right. 




On President's Left. 


1. 


Hon. Francis X. McCann 


1. 


Hon. Maurice A. Donahue 


2. 


Hon. Michael J. Galvin 


2. 


Hon. William D. Fleming 


3. 


Hon. Charles W. Olson 


3. 


Hon. Philip A. Graham 


4. 


Hon. Stanley J. Zarod 


4. 


Hon. Charles A. Bisbee. Jr. 


5. 


Hon. Joseph F. Gibney 


5. 


Hon. Newland H. Holmes 


6. 


Hon. William E. Hays 


6. 


Hon. Harry Delia Russo 


7. 


Hon. William X. Wall 


7. 


Hon. Denis L. McKenna 


8. 


Hon. Oliver F. Ames 


8. 


Hon. George V. Kenneally. Jr. 


9. 


Hon. James F. Burke 


9. 


I^n. Antone L. Silva 


10. 


Hon. George D. Hammond 


10. 


Hon. Mario Umana 


11. 


Hon. Leslie B. Cutler 


11. 


Hon. James S. McCormack 


12. 


Hon. Philibert L. Pellegrini 


12. 


Hon. James J. Long 




Hon. Charles V. Hogan 


13. 




13. 




14. 


Hon. James P. Rurak 


14. 


Hon. Paul H. Benoit 


15. 


Hon. Fred Lamson 


15. 


Hon. Edmund R. St. John. Jr. 


16. 


Hon. Mary L. Fonseca 


16. 


Hon. Joseph D. Ward 


17. 


Hon. Kevin B. Harrington 


17. 


Hon. John J. Conte 


18. 


Hon. George A. Sullivan, Jr. 


18. 


Hon. John F. Parker 


19. 


Hon. Allan F. Jones 


19. 


Hon. James W. Hennigan, Jr 


20. 


Hon.John E.Harrington. Jr. 


20. 


Hon. A. Frank Foster 



Officers of the Senate. 465 

OFFICERS AND EMPLOYEES 
OF THE SENATE. 



President of the Senate. 

Hon. JOHN E. POWERS, South Boston. 

Room 33)3, State House. 

Clerk of the Senate. 

THOMAS A. CHADWICK, Lowell. 

Room 330, State House. 

NORMAN L. PIDGEON, Walpole, Assistant Clerk. 

Clerical A ssistants. 

ALICE T. POPKO, Boston. 

DERWOOD R. ESTEY, Hingham. 

S ergeant-at- Arms. 

LEOPOLD LEPORE, Boston. 

Room 200, State House. 

Chaplain. 

Rt. Rev. Msgr. CHRISTOPHER P. GRIFFIN, 

South Boston. 



Counsel to the Senate. 

(General Laws, Chapter 3, Sections 51-55.) 

CHARLES J. INNES, Boston. 

Room 306, State House. 

Assistant Counsel. 
DAVID M. OWENS, Boston (Jamaica Plain). 

Assistants to Counsel to the Senate. 
BEATRICE FARRAR. Boston. 
HYMAN B. SEGAL. Brookline. 



JOHN J. SAWTELLE, Boston (Dorchester), Admin- 
istrative Assistant to President of the Senate. 

CHARLES L. POWERS, Boston (Dorchester). C/«r^ o/ 
Senate Committee on Rules. Room 331. State House. 



466 



House of Representatives, 



HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. 



(BY COUNTIES.) 



[In this list the politics of the several members is designated as follows: 
R, Republican: D. Democrat.] 



COUNTY OF BARNSTABLE. 



.J 

1 


District. 


Name of Representative. 


Residence. 


2, 


Barnstable 
Bourne 
Falmouth . 
Mashpee . 
Sandwich . 

Brewster . 
Chatham . 
Dennis 
East ham . 
Harwich . 
Orleans 
Provincetown 
Truro 
Weimeet . 
Yarmouth 




I Paul D. Reed, Jr. (R) 
► Stephen Weekes(R) . 


Barnstable. 
Harwich. 



-^c^ 



COUNTY OF BERKSHIRE. 



1 


North Adams . 


Roger A. Sala (D) 


North Adams. 


' 


Adams 
Clarksburg 


^ 




2< 


Florida 

New Ashford . 

Savoy 

Williamstown . 


y Edward S. Zelazo (R) 

J 


Florida. 



By Counties. 467 

COUNTY OF BERKSHIRE — Condi<ded. 



t 

1 


District. 


Name of Representative. 


Residence. 


5 








•{ 


Cheshire . 
Lanesborough , 
Pittsfield, Wards 
1,2 


\ Patrick E. Callaghan (D) . 


Pittsfield. 


*{ 


Pittsfield. Wards 
3, 4, 5 . 


} Wallace B. Crawford (R) . 


Pittsfield. 


5 

I 


Hancock . 
Pittsfield. Wards 
6, 7 


1 

\ Thomas C. Wojtkowski (D) 


Pittsfield. 




Becket 
Dalton . 
Hinsdale . 
Lee . 






6^ 


Lenox 
Otis 


> Warren A. Turner (R) 


Lee. 




Peru 

Tyringham 
Washington 
Windsor . 


J 




7< 


Alford 

Egremont 

Great Harrington 

Monterey 

Mt. Washington | 

New Marlborough 

Richmond 

Sandisfield 

Sheffield . 

Stockbridge 

West Stockbridge 


> Sidney Q. Curtiss (R) 


Sheffield. 



COUNTY OF BRISTOL. 



Attleboro . 

N. Attleborough 

Easton 

Mansfield 

Norton 

Raynham 



\ Donald T. Bliss (R) . 
/ George I. Spatcher (R) 



Walter W. O'Brien (R) 



^ 



N. Attleborough 
Attleboro. 



Raynham. 



468 House of Representatives, 

COUNTY OF BRISTOL — CoMciwdei. 





District. 


Name of Representative. 


Residence. 


M 


Taunton. Wards 
5. 7, 8 . 


J Frank G. Rico (D) . 


Taunton. 


M 


Taunton, Wards 
1, 2. 3, 4 


1 Charles L. Flannery (R) . . 


Taunton. 


5< 


Berkley . 
Dighton . 
Freetown . 
Rehoboth . 
Seekonk . 
Swansea . 
Taunton, Ward 6 


\ Ernest L. Goff, Jr. (R) 


Rehoboth. 


«{ 


New Bedford, 
Wards 1, 2 . 


\ Theophile J. DesRoches (D) 
j Leo J. Normandin (D) 


New Bedford. 
New Bedford. 


7' 


New Bedford, 
Wards 3, 4, 5 . 


\ Frank F. Lemos (D) . 

J George G. Mendonca (D) . 


New Bedford. 
New Bedford. 


«( 


New Bedford, 
Ward 6 . 


\ Joseph D. Saulnier (R) 


New Bedford. 


9 


Acushnet . 
Dartmouth 
Fairhaven . 


William Q. MacLean, Jr. (D) 


Fairhaven. 


.o( 


Fall River, Wards 
1, 2, 3 . 


\ Manuel Faria (D) 

/ Matthew J. Kuss (D) 


Fall River. 
Fall River. 


"{ 


Fall River, Wards 
4, 5, 6, 7 


\ John J. Long (D) 

/ James A. O'Brien, Jr. (D) . 


Fall River. 
Fall River. 


12 


Fall River, Ward 

8 . 
Westport . 


Milton R. Silva (R) . 


Fall River. 


13 


Fall River, Ward 

9 . 
Somerset . 


Gilbert M. Coroa (D) 


Fall River. 



// 



By Counties. 



469 



COUNTY OF DUKES COUNTY. 



Q 


District. 


Name of Representative. 


Residence. 


1^ 


Chilmark . 
Edgartown 
Gay Head 
Gosnold . 
Oak Bluffs 
Tisbury . 
West Tisbury 




> Joseph A. Sylvia (R) . 
/ 


Oak Bluffs. 








/ 





COUNTY OF ESSEX. 



'1 


Newburyport 
SaHsbury . 


1 Albert H. Zabriskie (D) 


Newburyport. 


2. 


Amesbury 
Essex 

Georgetown 
Gloucester, Wds. 

6, 7, 8 . 
Ipswich 


Beatrice K. Corliss (R) 
r John F. Dolan (R) 


Gloucester. 
Ipswich. 




Newbury . 

Rowley 

West Newbury . 






•{ 


Groveland 
Haverhill, Wards 

2. 4, 6, 7 
Merrimac 


I Edward S. Morrow (R) 
f Benjamin H. White (R) 


Haverhill. 
Groveland. 


«{ 


Haverhill, Wards 
1,3. 5 . 


1 Francis J. Bevilacqua (D) . 


Haverhill. 


5- 


Andover . 

Lawrence, Ward 
1 . . 

Methuen, Pre- 
cincts 1, 2, 4, 5 


William Longworth (R) 

V Albert P. Pettoruto (R) 

.Arthur Williams (R) . 


Methuen. 
Lawrence. 
Andover. 




North Andover . 




6 


Lawrence, Wards 

2, 6 
Methuen. Pet. 3 


\john C. Bresnahan (D) 
1 William J. Casey (D) . 


Lawrence. 
Lawrence. 


'{ 


Lawrence. Wards 
3. 4 


1 John J. Cronin (D) . 


Lawrence. 


8 


Lawrence, Wd. 5 


Lawrence P. Smith (D) 


Lawrence. 



7 



J 



470 House of Representatives, 

COUNTY OF ESSEX — ConcZMderf. 



District. 



Name of Representative. 



Residence. 



10 



11- 



12 



13 



14. 



15 



16 



Boxford . 
Danvers . 

Middleton 
Topsfield . 

Peabody, Wards 

2, 3, 4. 5, 6 
Salem, Wards 2 

4, 6 

Lynn, Wards 1. 
Lynnfield . 
Peabody, Wd. 
Saugus 

Lynn, Wds. 5, 6 

Lynn, Wards 2 

3, 4 
Nahant 

Marblehead 
Salem, Wards 1 

3, 5 
Swampscott 

Beverly 
Hamilton . 
Manchester 
Wenham . 

Gloucester, Wds. 

1. 2, 3, 4, 5 
Rockport . 



Paul G. ZoUo (R) 



i John T. Berry (D) 
( Thaddeus Buczko (D) 



Belden G. Bly, Jr. (R) 
Russell H. Craig (R) . 



Walter A. Cuffe (D) . 
Thomas W\ McGee (D) 

Philip N. Carney (D) 
Julie Gilligan (D) 
Andre R. Sigourney (D) 

Thomas M. Newth (R) 
J. Hilary Rockett (R) 
George B. Thomson (R) 



I Francis W. Hatch. Jr. (R) 
{ Cornelius J. Murray (R) 



David E. Harrison (D) 



Danvers. 



Peabody. 
Salem. 



Saugus. 
Lynnfield. 



Lynn. 
Lynn. 

Lynn. 
Lynn. 
Nahant. 

Swampscott. 
Marblehead. 
Swampscott. 



Beverly. 
Beverly. 



Gloucester. 



T 



By Counties. 

COUNTY OF FRANKLIN. 



471 



_J 








.H 








^ 


District. 


Name of Representative. 


Residence. 


Q 










' Ashfield . 








Bernardston 








Buckland . 








Charlemont 








Colrain 








Conway . 








Deerfield . 








Hawley 






1< 


Heath 

Leverett . 

Leyden 

Monroe 

Northfield 

Rowe 

Shelburne 

Sunderland 


- Winston Healy (R) . 


Charlemont. 




VVhately . 


> 




2 


Greenfield 


Allan McGuane (D) . 


Greenfield. 


f 


Erving 






1 GiU . 






3< 


Montague 






New Salem 
Orange 


} Walter T. Kostanski (R) . 


Montague. 




Shutesbury 


1 






1 Warwick . 


J 






1 Wendell . 





COUNTY OF HAMPDEN. 





; Brimfield . 
East Longmeadow 
Hampden 


\ 




1^ 


Holland . 
Longmeadow 




1 Raymond H. Beach (R) 
[ George T. Smith (R) . 


Wilbraham. 

E. Longmeadow. 




; Palmer 
Wales 
Wilbraham 








2 


Chicopee, Wards 

5, 6 
Ludlow 


[ John F. Thompson (D) 

J 


Ludlow. 



472 House of Representatives, 

COUNTY OF HAMPDEN — Condwded. 



District. 



Chicopee, Wards 
7. 8, 9 . 

Chicopee, Wards 
1, 2, 3, 4 

Springfield, Wds. 
2,8 

Springfield, Wds. 
3, 4 

Springfield. Wd. 5 

Springfield, Wd. 6 

Springfield. Wd. 7 

Springfield. Wd. 1 

Agawam . 
Blandford 
Chester 
Granville . 
Montgomery 
Russell 
Southwick 
Tolland . 
West Springfield 

Holyoke, Wards 
1, 2, 4 , 

Holyoke, Wards 
3, 6 

Holyoke, Wards 
5. 7 

Westfield . 



Name of Representative. 



\ Roger L. Bernashe (D) 

I Mitsie T. Kulig (D) . 

\ John J. Fitzgerald (D) 
J Dave N. Vigneault (D) 

\ William J. Kingston (D) 
/ Anthony M. Scibelli (D) 

Bernard J. Pat Foley (D) 

Philip K. Kimball (R) 

Saul Simons (R) 

Arthur J. McKenna (D) 



James C. Corcoran. Jr. (D) 
George W. Porter (R) 



Stephen T. Chmura (D) 

David M. Bartley (D; 

Emmett J. Cauley (D) 
Robert J. McGinn (D) 



Residence. 



Chicopee. 

Chicopee. 

Springfield. 
Springfield. 

Springfield. 
Springfield. 

Springfield. 

Springfield. 

Springfield. 

Springfield. 



W. Springfield. 
Agawam. 



Holyoke. 

Holyoke. 

Holyoke. 
Westfield. 



ry 



By Counties. 

COUNTY OF HAMPSHIRE. 



473 



1 


District. 


Name of Representative. 


Residence. 


Q 








n 


Northampton, 
Wds. 1.2,3,4,5 


1 Jeremiah J. Foley (D) 


Northampton. 


r 

2- 


Chesterfield 

Cummington 

Goshen 

Hatfield . 

Huntington 

Middlefield 

Northampton, 

Wards 6, 7 . 
Plainfield . 
Southampton 
Westhampton . 
Williamsburg 
Worthington 


1 
> John D. Barrus (R) . 


Goshen. 


3 

I 


Easthampton 
Hadley . 
South Hadley . 


1 
John G. Clark (D) . 


Easthampton. 


f 
4^ 


Amherst . 
Belchertown 
Granby 
Pelham , 
Ware 


1 
> James R. Nolen (D) . 


Ware. 




J 





COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX. 



Cambridge, Wds. 

1. 2, 3 . 
Somerville, Wd. 2 

Cambridge, Wds. 
4, 5. 6. 7. 8 



Cambridge, Wds. 

9, 10. 11 
Watertown, Pets. 

1, 2 

Newton, Wds. 

2. 3. 7 . 



Thomas F. Coady, Jr. (D) 
John J. Toomey (D) . 

Levin H. Campbell (R) 
William P. Homans. Jr. (D) 
Mary B. Newman (R) 



Timothy W. Hickey (D) 
George W. Spartichino (D) 



Joseph G. Bradley (D) 
John W. Whittemore (R) 



Cambridge. 
Cambridge. 

Cambridge. 
Cambridge. 
Cambridge. 



Cambridge. 
Cambridge. 



Newton. 
Newton. 



474 House of Representatives, 

COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX — ConitWMcd. 



t! 








5 


District. 


Name of Representative. 


Residence. 


={ 


Newton. Wds. 4, 
5. 6, 8 . 


\ Irving Fishman (D) . 

J Lorenz F. Muther. Jr. (R) . 


Newton. 
Newton. 


6 


Natick 


Walter T. Burke (D) 


Natick. 


7 


Waltham, Wds. 

1, 2, 4, 6 
Weston 


Donald J. Manning (D) 
Henry A. Turner (R) 


Waltham. 
Waltham. 


8- 


Ashland . 
Framingham 
Holliston . 
Hopkinton 
Sherborn . 


^ Anthony M. Colonna (D) . 
William I. Randall (R) 


Framingham. 
Framingham. 


9 


Marlborough 


John J. Navin (D) . 


Marlborough. 


r 


Hudson . . ^ 




,.{ 


Lincoln 
Sudbury . 
Wayland . 


> James DeNormandie (R) . 


Lincoln. 


r 


Acton 


^ Vernon R. Fletcher (R) 




■■{ 


Chelmsford 
Tyngsborough . 
Westford . 


Chelmsford. 


12- 

( 


Ashby 

Ayer 

Boxborough 

Dunstable 

Groton 

Littleton . 

Pepperell . 

Shirley 

Townsend 

Carlisle . 


> Chester H. Waterous (R) . 


Pepperell. 


■■{ 


Concord . 
Maynard . 
Stow 


Vjohn M. Eaton, Jr. (R) 


Concord. 


»i 


Lowell. Wards 3. 
6, 7, 8 . 


\ Archibald E. Kenefick (D) . 
/ Cornehus F. Kiernan (D) . 


Lowell. 
LoweU. 


"1 


Lowell. Wards 1, 
2.4.5.9.10,11 


1 CorneHusT.Finnegan,Jr.(D) 

\ John Janas (R) . 

j Raymond F. Rourke (D) . 


Lowell. 
Lowell. 
Lowell. 



By Counties. 

COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX — Co«/tnMtfi. 



475 



District. 



Name of Representative. 



Residence. 



Maiden, 
2, 3 



Wards 



Walt ham, Wards 

3, 5. 7 . 
Watertown, Pets. 

8, 10 . 

North Reading . 
Reading . 
Wilmington 
Woburn, Wards 
2,3,4,5,6, 7 . 

Bedford . 

Billerica . 

Burlington 

Dracut 

Lexington 

Tewksbury 

Everett, Wards 

2. 3, 4, 6 

Maiden, Wards 
1,4,5,6, 7.8 . 

Melrose 

Stoneham 

Wakefield 

Belmont . 
Watertown, Pets. 

3, 9 

Everett, Ward 1 
Somerville, Wds. 
1, 3, 4, 5 

Arlington, Pets. 

1, 3. 5 . 
Somerville, Wds. 

6. 7 

Medford, Wards 

2, 3, 4, 5, 6 . 



Maurice R. Flynn, Jr. (D) . Maiden. 



Richard D. Landry (D) . Waltham. 



[ Thomas F. Donohi:e (D) . Woburn. 
I Frank D. Tanner (R) . Reading. 



Stanley J. Bocko (D) . Billerica. 

John Brox (R) . . . Dracut. 



\ William H. Finnegan (D) . Everett. 

/ John P. Kennedy (D) . Everett. 

\ George H. O'Farrell (D) . Maiden. 

George B. Walsh (D) . Maiden. 

] Gardner E. Campbell (R) . Wakefield, 

\ Lloyd E. Conn (R) . . Melrose. 

J Theodore J. Vaitses (R) . Melrose. 



Walter T. Anderson (R) . Belmont. 

Janet K. Starr (R) . . Belmont. 

G. Edward Bradley (D) . Somerville. 

Michael J. Simonelli (D) . Somerville. 

Joseph T. Travaline (D) . Somerville. 



Joseph F. McEvoy, Jr. (D) . Somerville. 
William J. Moran (D) . Somerville. 



Michael Catino (D) . . Medford. 

John J. MeGlynn (D) . Medford. 

George L. Saceo, jr. (D) . Medford. 



7 



lU 



476 House of Representatives 

COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX — Cowc/uded. 



tj 










District. 


Name of Representative. 


Residence. 


27 


Everett, Ward 5 
Medford, Wards 
1, 7 


1 

!■ Paul J. Cavanaugh (D) 


Medford. 


28 


Arlington, Pets. 
2, 4, 6. 7, 8, 9, 
10.11,12,13,14 


1 John P. Buckley (D) . 
^Gregory B. Khachadoorian 
J (R) 


Arlington. 
Arlington- 


29 


Winchester 
Woburn, Wd. 1 . 


1 Harrison Chadwick (R) 


Winchester. 


30 { 


Watertown. Pets. 
4, 5. 6, 7 


1 Paul C. Menton (D) . 


Watertown. 



COUNTY OF NANTUCKET. 



Nantucket 



Arthur L. Desrocher (R) 

-4 



Nantucket. 



COUNTY OF NORFOLK. 



Quincy, Wards 3, 
4. 5, 6 . 

Quincy, Ward 1 

Braintree . 
Quincy, Ward 2 
Weymouth 

Holbrook . 

Milton 

Randolph 

Avon 

Sharon 

Stoughton 

Canton 
Dedham . 
Needham . 



Joseph E. Brett (D) . 
Amelio A. Delia Chiesa (R) . 
James R. Mclntyre (D) 

Charles L. Shea (D) . 

William A. Connell, Jr. (D) 

Herbert B. Hollis (R) 

Carl R. Johnson, Jr. (D) . 

Ralph W. Cartwright, Jr. (R) 
James G. Mullen (D) 



Robert C. Hahn (R) 



Daniel H. Rider (R) 
Harold E. Rosen (R) 



Quincy. 
Quincy. 
Quincy. 

Quincy. 

Weymouth. 

Braintree. 

Braintree. 



Randolph. 

Milton. 



Stoughton. 



Needham. 
Dedham. 



By Counties. 

COUNTY OF l^ORFOLK — Concluded. 



477 



.0 


District. 


Name of Representative. 


Residence. 


■{ 

'i 

r 

1 

10 


Dover 
Norwood . 
Wellesley . 
W'estwood 

Bellingham 
Medfield . 
Medway . 
Millis 
Walpole . 

Foxborough 

Franklin . 
Norfolk . 
Plainville . 
W'rentham 

Brookline . 


\ David H. Locke (R) . 
rjames G. Wheeler (R) 

] 

|> Thomas M.White (D) 

j> Paul A. Cataldo (R) . 

J 

1 Beryl W. Cohen (D) . 

V Michael S. Dukakis (D) 

Freyda P. Koplow (R) 


Wellesley. 
Westwood. 

Walpole. 

Franklin. 

Brookline. 
Brookline. 
Brookline. 



COUNTY OF PLYMOUTH. 



4 



Carver 
Halifax 

Kingston . 

Plymouth 

Plympton 

Duxbury . 
Hanover . 
Marshfield 
Pembroke 
Scituate . 

Cohasset (Norfolk 

County) 
Hingham . 
Hull 
Norwell 

Abington . 
Hanson 
Rockland . 



John A. Armstrong (R) 



Harold H. Wlcher (R) 



Alfred R. Shrigley (R) 



Keith E. Collins (R) 



Plymouth. 



Marshfield, 



Hingham. 



Abington. 



478 



House of Representatives, 

COUNTY OF PLYMOUTH — Conc/wded. 



5 


District. 


Name of Representative. 


Residence. 


{ 


Bridgewater 
East Bridgewater 
West Bridgewater 
Whitman . 

Lakeville . 
Marion 
Mattapoisett 
Middleborough . 
Rochester 
Wareham . 

Brockton, Wards 
3.4 

Brockton, Wards 
1,2,5 . 

Brockton, Wards 
6. 7 


\ Edward P. Kirby (R) 
> Edwin H. Morse (R) . 

J 

} George H. Burgeson (R) . 

\ James P. Downey (D) 

/ Paul Maurice Murphy (D) 

\ Peter George Asiaf (D) 


Whitman. 

Wareham. 

Brockton. 

Brockton. 
Brockton. 

Brockton. 



COUNTY OF SUFFOLK. 



Boston, 
Boston, 
Boston, 



Ward 1 
Ward 2 
Ward 3 



Boston, Ward 4 



Boston, 
Boston, 
Boston, 
Boston, 



Ward 5 
Ward 6 
Ward? 
Wards 



Boston, Ward 9 



Louis Buttiglieri (D) 
Michael A. D'Avolio (D; 

Gerard F. Doherty (D) 

Joseph A. Langone, 3rd. (D) 
Michael A. Nazzaro, Jr. (D) 

Gordon D. Boynton (R) 
Perhe Dyar Chase (R) 

John W. Frenning (R) 
William F. Otis (R) . 

John T. Tynan (D) . 

William M. Bulger (D) 
James F. Condon (D) 

Charles lannello (D) . 



Lincoln G. Pope, Jr. (D) 



Boston. 
Boston. 



Boston. 



Boston. 
Boston. 



Boston. 
Boston. 



Boston. 
Boston. 



Boston. 



Boston. 
Boston. 



Boston. 



Boston. 



/ - 



By Counties. 



479 



COUNTY OF SUFFOLK — Concluded. 



5 

a 


District. 


Name of Representative. 


Residence. 


10 


Boston. Wards 10, 
11. 


\ William A. Carey (D) 
\ James H. Kelly (D) . 
{ David J. O'Connor (D) 


Boston. 
Boston. 
Boston. 


11 


Boston, Ward 12 


/ Royal L. Boiling (D) 
\ Alfred S. Brothers (R) 


Boston. 
Boston. 


12 


Boston. Ward 13 


Robert H. Quinn (D) 


Boston. 


13 


Boston. Ward 14 


r Julius Ansel (D) 

\ Samuel Harmon (D) . 

i, Benjamin Klebanovv (D) 


Boston. 
Boston. 
Boston. 


14 


Boston. Ward 15 


Domenick S. Pasciucco (D) 


Boston. 


15 


Boston. Ward 16 


[ Paul Murphy (D) 

\ Thomas A. Sheehan (D) 


Boston. 
Boston. 


16 


Boston. Ward 17 


/ Gerald J. Morrissey (D) 
\ Joseph B. Walsh (D) 


Boston. 
Boston. 


17 


Boston. Ward 18 


[ Daniel W. Carney (D) 

■1 Michael Paul Feeney (D) . 

i Joseph M. Kearney (D) 


Boston, 
Boston. 
Boston. 


18 


Boston, Ward 19 


[ James J. Craven. Jr. (D) . 
\ Stephen C. Davenport (D) . 


Boston. 
Boston. 


19 


Boston. Ward 20 


[ Robert L. Cawley (D) 

{ Charles Robert Doyle (D) . 

[ Patick W. Nee (D) . 


Boston. 
Boston. 
Boston. 


20 


Boston, Ward 21 


[ Arnold I. Epstein (D) 
\ William F. Joyce (D) 
L Norman S. Weinberg (D) . 


Boston. 
Boston. 
Boston. 


21 


Boston, Ward 22 


/ Robert Q. Crane (D) 
\ Vincent J. Shanley (D) 


Boston. 
Boston. 


"i 


Chelsea, Wards 1. 
3 . 


1 Albert Kramer (D) . 


Chelsea. 


23 ( 


Chelsea. Wards 2, 
4. 5 


\ John F. Donovan. Jr. (D) . 


Chelsea. 


24 


Revere 


1 Raymond E. Carey (D) 
\ Joseph Del Grosso (D) 


Revere. 
Revere. 


25 


Winthrop . 


Fred A. Baumeister (R) 


Winthrop. 



.0^ 



480 



House of Representatives, 

COUNTY OF WORCESTER. 



District. 



Name of Representative. 



Residence. 



Athol 

Royalston 

Winchendon 

Ashburnham 
Fitchburg, Wd. 
Hubbardston 
Petersham 
Phillipston 
Princeton . 
Templeton 
Westminster 

Barre 

Hardwick 
Holden . 
New Braintree 
North Brookfield 
Oakham . 
Paxton 
Rutland . 

Brookfield 

East Brookfield 

Spencer 

Sturbridge 

Warren 

West Brookfield 

Southbridge 

Dudley- 
Webster . 

Auburn 
Charlton . 
Leicester . 
Oxford 

Blackstone 
Douglas . 
Hopedale . 
Mendon . 
Millbury . 
MillviUe . 
Northbridge 
Sutton 
Uxbridge . 



Harold L. Dower (R) 



y William H. Mork (R) 



Edward D. Harrington, Jr. (R) 



Philip A. Quinn (D) . 

Leo J. Cournoyer (D) 
John P. Ivascyn (D) . 

James A. Kelly, Jr. (D) 



Charles E. Luke Driscoll (R) 
Charles A. Mullaly, Jr. (D) 



Athol. 



Templeton. 



Holden. 



Spencer. 

Southbridge. 
Webster. 

Oxford. 



Northbridge. 
Millville. 



6 



By Counties. 

COUNTY OF WORCESTER — Concluded. 



481 



District. 



Name of Representative. 



Residence. 



Grafton 

Milford . 

Shrewsbury 

Southborough 

Upton 

Westborough 

Gardner . 

Berlin 
Bolton 
Boylston . 
Clinton 
Harvard . 
Lancaster . 
Leominster, Wd 
Lunenburg 
Northborough 
Sterling 
West Boylston 

Leominster, Wds. 
1. 2. 4. 5 

Fitchburg, Wards 
1,2 



Fitchburg, 
4, 5. 6 . 

Worcester, 
Worcester, 
Worcester, 
Worcester, 
Worcester, 
Worcester, 
Worcester, 
Worcester, 
Worcester, 
Worcester, 



Wards 



John F. X. Davoren (D) 
Nathan Rosenfeld (R) 



Martin H. Walsh (D) 



Thomas F. Fallon (D) 
C. Clifford Stone (R) 



Wd. 


1 


Wd. 


2 


Wd. 


3 


Wd. 


4 


Wd. 


5 


Wd. 


6 


Wd. 


7 


Wd 


8 


Wd 


9 


Wd 


10 



J. Robert Mahan (D) 
Normand J. Babineau (R) 

Gerald P. Lombard (D) 

Albert A. Gammal, Jr. (R) 
Robert J. Bohigian (D) 
Leo J. Turo (D) 
Charles J. Buffone (D) 
Anthony J. Burke (D) 
Vite J. Pigaga (D) 
Leo J. Reynolds (D) . 
Thomas F. Farrell (D) 
Joseph D. Early (D) . 
David B. Hamilton (R) 



Milford. 
Milford. 



Gardner. 



Clinton. 
Clinton. 



Leominster. 
Fitchburg. 

Fitchburg. 

Worcester. 
Worcester. 
Worcester. 
Worcester. 
Worcester. 
Worcester. 
Worcester. 
Worcester. 
Worcester. 
Worcester. 



3 



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500 Officers of the House. 

OFFICERS AND EMPLOYEES OF THE 
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. 



Hon. JOHN F. THOMPSON, Ludlow, Speaker. Room 

355, State House. 
WILLIAM C. MAIERS, Quincy, Clerk. Room 358, State 

House. 
WALLACE C. MILLS, Milton, Assistant Clerk. Room 

358, State House. 
LEOPOLD LEPORE, Boston, Sergeant-at-Arms, Room 200, 

State House. 
Very Reverend Monsignor GEORGE V. KERR, Boston. 

Chaplain. 

Assistants to House Clerk. 
Clement E. Walsh, Boston, First Clerical Assistant. 
Lorraine M. Curran, Medford, Indexarian. 
Robert E. MacQueen, Boston, Second Clerical Assistant. 
Robert E. Herrick, Boston, Third Clerical Assistant. 



Counsel to the House. 
(General Laws, Chapter 3, Sections 51-55). 
FREDERICK BANCROFT WILLIS, Lynn. Room 362, 
State House. 

Associate Counsel. 
HARRY COLTON, Chelsea. Room 362, State House. 

Assistants to the House, Counsel. 
PATRICK F. PLUNKETT, Tewksbury. Room 362, 

State House. 
RENE R. BERNARDIN, Lawrence. Room 362 State 

House. 
JOSEPH J. SCHULER, Cambridge. Room 362, State 

House. 

BERNICE W. DELROY, Braintree, Secretary to the House 
Counsel, Clerk of the House Committee on Bills in the 
Third Reading. Room 362. State House. 

Assistants. 
Mary A. Donohue .... Cambridge 

Helen M. Harvey .... Boston 



Officers of the House. 



501 



Assistants to the Speaker. 

ALBERT S. PREVITE. Lawrence. Room 356, State 

House. 
ALEXANDER J. CELLA, Medford. Room 3.S6, State 

House. 
WILLLA.M J. ASSELIN. Jr.. Chicopee. Room 356, State 

House. 

ALICE R. MOONEY, Boston, Secretary to the Speaker of 
the House, Clerk of House Committee on Rules. Room 355, 
State House. 

Assista7tts. 

Boston. 
Waban. 
Watertown. 



Julia R. Powers 
Regina a. Graham 
Helen F. Sinatra 



MONITORS OF THE HOUSE. 



First Division 
Second Division 
Third Division 
Fourth Division 



Rep. Carey 

Della Chiesa 

Rep. Sala . 

Crawford 

Rep. Catino 
Bly . 

Rep. Mahan 
Beach 



of Revere, 
of Quincy. 

of North Adams, 
of Pittsfield. 

of Medford. 
of Saugus. 

of Leominster, 
of Wilbraham. 



502 Sergea?it-at-Arms, etc. 



SERGE ANT-AT-ARMS AND APPOINTEES. 



Leopold Lepore, Boston Sergeant-ai-Arms 

Room 200, State House 



Appointees. 

Assistant to the Sergeant-at-Arms — John J. Cavanaugh. 

Administrative Assistant to the Sergeant-ai-Arms — Edward T. Dinan. 

Secretary — Ida C. McDonough. 

Assistant Secretary — John F. Given. 

2nd Assistant Secretary — Louise L. Giannini. 

Messenger and Porter — Richard S. McGah. 

Porter — Joseph Strickland. 

Document Clerk — James E. Phelan, Jr. 

Assistant Document Clerk — Franklin E. Cornelius. 

Assistant in Document Room — Peter Skerry. 

Temporary Assistants in Document Room — Joseph E. Griffin, John J. 
Haley, Charles A. Lydon, Thomas C. McCarthy, Lawrence McNicho- 
las, Eugene F. O'Shea, Nathan Rosenberg, Israel Ruby. 

Assigned to the Senate. 

Doorkeepers — Theodore L. Beless, James A. Donlan. 

Assistant Doorkeepers — Francis R. Burke, Robert J. Kelly, Joseph 
V. King, John LoPresti, Richard J. Powers. 

General Court Officers — Mario F. Corso, William P. Conley, George 
Danielson, Jr., John M. Downing, Alexander Dumalac, John F. 
Drummey, Thomas J. Farley, Vincenzo Ferraro, James K. Flaherty, 
Joseph M. Foley, Leo J. King, Frederick F. Mclnnis, Joseph V. Mor- 
gan, Roland A. Morin, Arthur I. Senter, Harris Taylor, Oswald Thomas, 
William H. Vail, Patrick S. Wallace. John C. Whooley. 

Pages — Leonard Alkins, Francis Blessington, John A. Brienzi, 
John H. Burke, Francis X. Craven, Peter Cohen, Benjamin DeChristo- 
foro, Richard M. Hagerty, Richard F. Lyman, William F. Marcelonis, 
Donald R. McNeil, John J. Morrissey, Jr., Francis Morrissey, James 
L. Mullin, Francis R. Norton, John P. Norton, Edward P. O'Neill, 
John F. Tierney, James G. Walsh, Robert J. Yeager, Anthony M. Zizza. 



Sergeant-at-Arms, etc. 503 



Assigned to the House of Representatives. 

Doorkeepers — Joseph Margolis, Daniel F. Sullivan, 

Assistant Doorkeepers — Edward J. Grimley, George H. McDermott, 
Stanley M. Motyka, Bernard F. O'Hayre, William P. Petrigno. 

General Court Officers — Edward G. Bellis, Louis J. Bertolino, Nicholas 
B. Bollino, Edward F. Crane, Joseph M. Corso, Gaspar J. Conforto, 
Louis J. Cuneo, Angelo Dell'lsola, Joseph M. Finnegan, Martin A. 
Griffin, Edward J. Gurry, William A. Guyette, Arthur R. Hall, Wil- 
liam F. Higgins, Ernest R. Irish, Edward J. Joyce, James Kahalas, 
Raymond P. Laham, WiUiam E. Laverne, Eugene P. Mellody, Frank 
Messina, Theodore R. Mullis, Henry T. Murray, Jr., W^ Frederick 
Neal, Edmund D. O'Brien, Joseph M. O'Loughlin, Daniel E. Regan, 
Armando Ricciotti, John E. Ryan, Jr., Joshua Smith, Emelio J. Tecce, 
Robert D. Tierney, James R. JuHan. 

Pages — Raymond J. Amaru, William F. Barrett, Michael B. Bollino, 
William J. Borsa, Frederick J. Callahan, Edward J. Canney, Joseph A. 
DeNucci, Barry S. Dias, Francis B. Donnelly, Francis M. Flynn, John 
J. Horan, Jr., Bartley J. Joyce, Harry F. Kearins, John G. Kelleher, 
Joseph L. Langone, Michael A. Luongo, James Lovetere, John J. 
Mahoney, Paul J. McDermott, Robert W. Murray, Albert P. O'Neill, 
Frederick R. Petrigno, John V. Phelan, Carl R. Randolph, Kevin M. 
Shea, Stephen J. Spillane, Salvatore Tecce, Anthony Tordiglione. 



LEGISLATIVE BULLETIN AND DAILY LISTS. 
Godfrey G. Torrey, Topsheld Editor 

Mary E. Barry, North Reading Secretary 

Room 431, State House 



504 Reporters. 

LEGISLATIVE REPORTERS. 



Albano, Joseph {Boston Record American), 31 Day Circle, Woburn. 

Alden, Vance L. {State House News Service), 83 Washington Street 
Marblehead. 

Bucci, Frank {Boston Traveler), 150 Liberty Street, Braintree. 

Burton, Charles {State House News Service), 29 South Main Street. 
Sharon. 

Carney, Michael J. {Lawrence Eagle Tribune), Johnson Avenue, Salem, 
N. H. 

Clark, Julius V. {Wall Street Journal), 146 West Wyoming Avenue, 
Melrose. 

Costello, Paul {Boston Herald), 18A Forest Street, Cambridge, 

Creamer, J. Robert {State House News Service), P.O. Box 143, West 
Boxford 

Dalton, Cornelius {Boston Traveler), 5 Juniper Road, Wellesley. 

Daly, Richard W. {Worcester Telegram Gazette), 20 Avon Road, 
Wellesley. 

Day, Fred E. Jr. {Lowell Su7t), 21 Belmont Street, Lowell. 

Driscoll, Paul {Worcester Telegram Gazette), 143 Beacon Street, Fram- 
ingham. 

Farrell, David {Boston Herald), 36 Belcher Circle, Milton. 

Gallagher, Thomas C. {Boston Herald), 108 Parker Street, Maynard. 

Griffin, William J. {State House News Service), 11 Ely Road, Dorchester. 

Hern, David {Boston Traveler), 39 Landseer Street, West Roxbury 12. 

Hurley, Cornelius {Associated Press)^12 Fairway Drive, West Newton. 

Kaufman, Louis {Boston Globe). 

Ksith, Russell M. {Springfield Union), 32 Oxford Street, Newton Center. 

Kenney, Robert B. {Boston Globe), 22 Buena Vista Road, Arlington. 

Knowles, Howard S. {Worcester Telegram Gazette), 116 Walton Park, 
Melrose. 

Lewis, William J. {Boston Globe), HI Woodcliffe Road, Brookline. 

Mclntyre, Mark {State House News Service), 3 Smith Court. Apt. 6, 
Boston. 

Micciche, Salvatore J. {Boston Globe), 108 First Street, Melrose. 

Michelson, Abraham A. {Berkshire Eagle), 24 Valentine Street, Pitts- 
field. 

McLaughlin, James {State House News Service), 55 Home Park Road, 
Braintree. 

Mills, Edgar M. {Christian Science Monitor), Forest Lane, Medfield. 

Nolan, Martin F. {Boston Globe), 17 South Normandy Avenue, Cam- 
bridge. 

Owens, C. R. {Boston Globe), 160 Park Street, West Roxbury. 

Reilly, Frank K. {Boston Record American), 91 Child Street, Hyde Park. 

Richards, Peter S. {United Press International), 189 Concord Avenue, 
Cambridge 38. 

Ryan, Karl J. {State House News Service), Room 458 State House, 
Boston. 

Ryan, Paul C. {State House News Service), 12 Melville Avenue, Dor- 
chester. 

Tivnan, Frank M. Jr. {Boston Herald), id Myrtle Street, Apt. 6, Boston. 

Woodman, Wendell {New England Newspaper Service), 49 Summer 
Street, Medford. 



COMMITTEES. 



Standing pommittees of the Senate. 507 

STANDING COMMITTEES OF 
THE SENATE. 



ON RULES. 

The President. 

Sen. Donahue of Hampden. 

HoGAN of Essex. 

McCann of Middlesex. 

RuRAK of Essex. 

Zarod of Hampden. 

Graham of Essex. 

Holmes of Norfolk and Plymouth. 

Olson of Middlesex and Worcester. 

Lamson of Middlesex, 

ON WAYS AND MEANS. 

Sen. Fleming of Worcester. 

FONSECA of Bristol. 

HoGAN of Essex. 

McCann of Middlesex. 

Hennigan .... of Suffolk. 

Umana of Suffolk. 

Holmes of Norfolk and Plymouth. 

Parker of Bristol. 

Hays of Middlesex. 

ON BILLS IN THE THIRD READING. 

Sen. McCann of Middlesex. 

Ward of Worcester. 

Bisbee of Franklin and Hampshire. 

ON ENGROSSED BILLS. 

Sen, Long of Middlesex. 

McKenna .... of Middlesex. 
Jones Cape and Plymouth, 



508 Standing Committees of tiie House. 

STANDING COMMITTEES OF 
THE HOUSE. 



ON RULES. 

The Speaker. 

Rep. Davoren of Milford. 

QuiNN of Boston. 

O'Connor of Boston. 

Crane of Boston. 

Reynolds of Worcester. 

Bernashe of Chicopee. 

Long of Fall River. 

DesRoches .... of New Bedford. 

Pope of Boston. 

Fitzgerald .... of Springfield. 

CuRTiss of SheflEield. 

Murray of Beverly. 

Beach of Wilbraham. 

Armstrong .... of Plymouth. 

ON WAYS AND MEANS. 

Rep. TooMEY of Cambridge. 

Kingston of Springfield. 

Cournoyer* .... of Southbridge. 
Bresnahan .... of Lawrence. 

SciBELLi of Springfield. 

Farrell of Worcester. 

IvASCYN of Webster. 

Kelly of Boston. 

Simonelli of Somerville. 

Zabriskie of Newburyport. 

Finnegan of Everett. 

Sala of North Adams. 

* Clerk. 



Standing Committees of the House. 



509 



Rep. Cartwright .... of Randolph. 

Bly of Saugus. 

Stone of Clinton. 

Corliss of Gloucester. 



ON ELECTIONS. 



Rep. FiNNEGAN 

Crane . 
Reynolds 

COLONNA 

Bern ASHE 
Curtiss 

DOLAN 



of Everett, 
of Boston, 
of Worcester, 
of Framingham. 
of Chicopee. 
of Sheffield, 
of Ipswich. 



ON BILLS IN THE THIRD READING. 

Rep. CoLONNA of Framingham. 

Condon of Boston. 

Randall of Framingham. 

ON ENGROSSED BILLS. 

Rep. Navin of Marlborough. 

O'Farrell .... of Maiden. 
Corliss of Gloucester. 

ON PAY ROLL. 

Rep. Navin of Marlborough, 

Ansel of Boston. 

Bliss of North Attleborough. 



510 



Joint Standing Committees. 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEES. 



ON AERONAUTICS. 



Sen. 



Harrington 
Della Russo 
mccormack 
Cutler 



Rep. Lemos . 

Buttiglieri 
Murphy . 
Mullen . 
Craven 
Flynn . 
White . 
Baumeister 
Newman . 
Reed* . 
Weekes . 



. of Aliddlesex. 

. of Suffolk. 

. of Norfolk. 

. of Norfolk and Middlesex. 



of New Bedford, 
of Boston, 
of Brockton, 
of Milton, 
of Boston, 
of Maiden, 
of Walpole. 
of Winthrop. 
of Cambridge, 
of Barnstable, 
of Harwich. 



Sen. 



Rep, 



ON AGRICULTURE. 

Benoit of Worcester and Hampden. 

RuRAK of Essex. 

Hays of Middlesex. 

St. JOHN of Berkshire. 

Bocko of Billerica. 

Foley of Northampton. 

AsiAF of Brockton. 

Bradley of Somerville. 

Smith of Lawrence. 

Kennedy of Everett. 

McGlynn of Medford. 

* Clerk. 



Joint Standing Committees. 



511 



Brox of Dracut. 

Campbell of Cambridge. 

Starr* of Belmont. 

Hahn of Stoughton. 

ON BANKS AND BANKING. 

Sen. Henxigan of Suffolk. 

Pellegrixi .... of Middlesex. 

CoNTE of Worcester. 

Hamimoxd of Hampden and Berkshire. 

Rep. D'AvoLio of Boston. 

Langoxe of Boston. 

McEvoY of Somerville. 

Buckley of Arlington. 

Carey of Boston. 

Foley of Springfield. 

Murphy of Boston. 

Nazzaro of Boston. 

Craig of Lynnfield. 

Janas of Lowell. 

Fletcher of Chelmsford. 

ON CITIES. 



Sen. 



Harrixgtox 
Pellegrixi . 

COXTE . 

Ames . 



Rep. TuRO . 

Bevilacqua 
Kuss . 
Shaxley* 
Davexport 

KULIG . 

Hickey 
Kearxey 



. of Middlesex. 

. of Middlesex. 

. of Worcester. 

. of Suffolk. 

. of Worcester. 

. of Haverhill. 

. of Fall River. 

. of Boston. 

. of Boston. 

. of Chicopee. 

. of Cambridge. 

. of Boston. 



* Clerk. 



512 



Joint Standing Committees . 



Rep. Della Chiesa ... of Quincy. 

Brothers of Boston. 

Thomson of Swampscott. 



ON CIVIL SERVICE. 



Rep. 



Sen. Long . 
McKenna 
Kenneally 

BiSBEE. 

Mendonca 

Chmura 

Early . 

McKenna 

morrissey 

Doyle . 

Downey* 

Sheehan 

Porter 

Collins 

Turner 



of Middlesex. 

of Middlesex. 

of Suffolk. 

of Franklin and Hampshire. 

of New Bedford. 

of Holj'oke. 

of Worcester. 

of Springfield. 

of Boston. 

of Boston. 

of Brockton. 

of Boston. 

of Agawam. 

of Abington. 

of W^altham. 



Sen. 



Rep, 



ON CONSTITUTIONAL LAW. 

Ward .of Worcester. 

Sullivan of Norfolk. 

Galvin of Norfolk and Suffolk. 

Hays of Middlesex. 

Fallon of Clinton. 

O'Brien of 'Fall River. 

Joyce of Boston. 

Tr A VALINE* .... of Somerville. 

Donovan of Chelsea. 

McGuANE of Greenfield. 

Carney of Boston. 

BuFFONE of Worcester. 

Hamilton of Worcester. 

* Clerk. 



Joint Standing Committees. 513 



Williams of Andover. 

Otis of Boston. 

ON COUNTIES. 

Sen. SiLVA of Bristol. 

Burke of Plymouth. 

Benoit of Worcester and Hampden. 

Jones of Cape and Plymouth. 

Rep. MuLLALY of Millville. 

Bevilaqua .... of Haverhill. 

CoLONNA of Framinghara. 

Lemos of New Bedford. 

Rico of Taunton. 

BocKO of Billerica. 

HiCKEY of Cambridge. 

Moran of Somerville. 

Morrow of Haverhill. 

BuRGESON of Brockton. 

Dower of Athol. 

ON EDUCATION. 

Sen. FoNSECA of Bristol. 

Harrington .... of Essex. 

CoNTE of Worcester. 

BiSBEE of Franklin and Hampshire. 

Rep. McGUANE of Greenfield. 

WojTKOWSKi .... of Pittsfield. 

Kuss of Fall River. 

PiGAGA of Worcester. 

Bulger of Boston. 

Sacco* of Medford. 

Cawley of Boston. 

Bartley of Holyoke. 

Dower of Athol. 

Waterous .... of Pepperell. 

Janas of Lowell. 

* Clerk. 



514 



Joint Standing Committees. 



Sen. 



Rep. 



ON ELECTION LAWS. 

Harrington .... of Essex. 

Wall of Essex. 

Kenneally .... of Suffolk. 

Ames of Suffolk. 

Finnegan of Everett. 

Joyce of Boston. 

Crane of Boston. 

Fallon of Clinton. 

Burke of Worcester. 

Walsh of Maiden. 

KuLiG of Chicopee. 

TuRO of Worcester. 

Whittemore . . . .of Newton. 

Desrocher .... of Nantucket. 

GoFF of Rehoboth. 

ON HARBORS AND PUBLIC LANDS. 



Sen. 



Rep. 



Olson . 

RURAK . 
McCORMACK 

Jones . 

normandin 
MacLean* 
Shea . 
O'Brien 

CUFFE . 

Carney 
Cohen . 

DOLAN . 

Desrocher 
Sylvia . 
Bliss . 



of Middlesex and Worcester. 

of Essex. 

of Norfolk. 

of Cape and Plymouth. 

of New Bedford. 

of Fairhaven. 

of Quincy. 

of Fall River. 

of Lynn. 

of Lynn. 

of Brookline. 

of Ipswich. 

of Nantucket. 

of Oak Bluffs. 

of North Attleborough. 



ON HIGHWAYS AND MOTOR VEHICLES. 

Sen. Zarod of Hampden. 

Benoit of Worcester and Hampden. 



Joint Standing Committees. 515 

Sen. Harrington .... of Middlesex. 

Olson of Middlesex and Worcester. 

Rep. Mahan of Leominster. 

Long* of Fall River. 

Mendonca .... of Fall River. 

Foley of Springfield. 

Klebanow . . . .of Boston. 

Cauley of Holyoke. 

Lemos of New Bedford. 

Cawley of Boston. 

Bohigian of Worcester. 

SiLVA of Fall River. 

MORK of Templeton. 

ON INSURANCE. 

Sen. Sullivan of Norfolk. 

SiLVA of Bristol. 

Harrington .... of Middlesex. 

Hays of Middlesex. 

Rep. McEvoY of Somerville. 

Burke of Worcester. 

Coroa of Fall River. 

McGuANE of Greenfield. 

Carney of Lynn. 

Bradley of Newton. 

McGee of Lynn. 

Donovan of Chelsea. 

Craig of Lynnfield. 

Kimball of Springfield. 

Fletcher of Chelmsford. 

ON THE JUDICIARY. 

Sen, Foster of Suffolk. 

Hennigan of Suffolk. 

Wall of Essex. 

* Clerk. 



516 



Joint Standing Committees. 



Sen. Ward of Worcester. 

Hays of Middlesex. 

St. John of Berkshire. 

Rep. WojTKOWSKi .... of Pittsfield. 

D'AvoLio of Boston. 

Corcoran of West Springfield. 

COROA of Fall River. 

Tra valine .... of Somerville. 

Carney of Boston. 

Davenport .... of Boston. 

.... of . 

.... of . 

Kimball of Springfield. 

Vaitses of Melrose. 

Conn of Melrose. 

Kirby of Whitman. 



ON LABOR AND INDUSTRIES. 



Sen. 



Donahue . 
Burke . 
mccormack 

Ames . 



Rep. Walsh . 
Casey . 
Buttiglieri 
Klebanow 
McKenna. 
Buffone* . 

DOHERTY . 

Rosenfeld 
Brothers . 
Driscoll . 
Spatcher . 



of Hampden, 
of Plymouth, 
of Norfolk, 
of Suffolk. 

of Gardner, 
of Lawrence. ' 
of Boston, 
of Boston, 
of Springfield, 
of Worcester, 
of Boston, 
of Milford. 
of Boston, 
of Northbridge. 
of Attleboro. 



* Clerk. 



Joint Standing Committees. 517 



ON LEGAL AFFAIRS. 

Sen. HoGAN of Essex. 

Wall of Essex. 

Harrington of Middlesex. 

St. John of Berkshire. 

Rep. Weinberg of Boston. 

Fallon of Clinton. 

Joyce of Boston. 

Corcoran of West Springfield. 

Sacco of Medford. 

Bulger of Boston. 

MacLean of Fairhaven. 

Vaitses of Melrose. 

Crawford . . . .of Pittsfield. 

Newth of Swampscott. 

Simons of Springfield. 



ON MERCANTILE AFFAIRS. 

Sen. Pellegrini .... of Middlesex. 

SiLVA of Bristol. 

CoNTE of Worcester. 

Lamson . ... . .of Middlesex. 

Rep. O'Farrell .... of Maiden. 

Ansel of Boston. 

Fitzgerald .... of Springfield. 

McGinn* of Westfield. 

Pasciucco of Boston. 

Clark of Easthampton. 

Epstein of Boston. 

Morrow of Haverhill. 

White of Groveland. 

Anderson of Belmont. 

Chase of Boston. 



♦ Clerk 



518 Joint Standing Committees. 



ON METROPOLITAN AFFAIRS. 

Sen. Della Russo , . .of Suffolk. 

Umana of Suffolk. 

Hennigan of Suffolk. 

Cutler of Norfolk and Middlesex. 

Rep. Buckley of Arlington. 

Brett of Quincy. 

Carey* of Revere. 

O'Connor of Boston. 

Langone of Boston. • 

Bradley of Newton. 

MoRRissEY .... of Boston. 

Kearney of Boston. 

Baumeister .... of Winthrop. 
Whittemore .... of Newton. 
Campbell of Wakefield. 



ON MILITARY AFFAIRS. 

Sen. Ward of Worcester. 

Long of Middlesex. 

Foster of Suffolk. 

Graham of Essex. 

Rep. Lombard of Fitchburg. 

Bohigian of Worcester. 

Tynan of Boston. 

Mullen of Milton. 

Walsh* of Boston. 

Menton of Water town. 

Sigourney .... of Nahant. 

Tanner of Reading. 

Shrigley of Hingham. 

Turner of Lee. 

Boynton of Boston, 

* Clerk. 



Joint Standing Committees. 



519 



ON MUNICIPAL FINANCE. 



Sen. McKexna 
Sullivan 
Galvin 
Lamson 

Rep. Coloxxa 

KlERNAN 

Iannello 

CUFFE . 

FariH . 
Shanley 
Condon 
Early * 
Flannery 
Della Chiesa 
Randall . 



. of Middlesex. 

. of Norfolk. 

. of Norfolk and Suffolk. 

. of Middlesex. 

. of Framingham. 

. of Lowell. 

. of Boston. 

. of Lynn. 

. of Fall River, 

. of Boston. 

. of Boston. 

. of Worcester. 

. of Taunton. 

. of Quincy. 

. of Framingham. 



ON NATURAL RESOURCES. 

Sen. Harrington .... of Essex. 

RuRAK of Essex. 

Pellegrini .... of Middlesex. 

Bisbee of Franklin and Hampshire. 

Rep. Rico of Taunton. 

Walsh of Gardner. 

Nee of Boston. 

Spartichino .... of Cambridge. 

BOLLiNG of Boston. 

Kramer of Chelsea. 

Kelly of Oxford. 

DoLAN of Ipswich. 

KosTANSKi .... of Montague. 

Barrus of Goshen. 

O'Brien* of Raynham. 

* Clerk. 



520 Joint Standing Committees. 



ON PENSIONS AND OLD AGE ASSISTANCE. 

Sen. McCoRMACK .... of Norfolk. 

Della Russo ... of Sufifolk. 

Galvin of Norfolk and Suffolk. 

Hammond of Hampden and Berkshire. 

Rep. Shea of Quincy. 

PiGAGA of Worcester. 

DesRoches .... of New Bedford. 

Kenefick of Lowell. 

Harmon=^ of Boston. • 

BuczKO of Salem. 

FiSHMAN of Newton. 

Saulnier of New Bedford. 

KoPLOW of Brookline. 

Khachadoorian ... of Arlington. 

Pettoruto .... of Lawrence. 



ON POWER AND LIGHT. 

Sen. RuRAK of Essex. 

McCann of Middlesex. 

Umana of SuiTolk. 

Lamson of Middlesex. 

Rep. Casey of Lawrence. 

Tynan of Boston. 

Rourke* of Lowell. 

Pasciucco of Boston. 

CONNELL of Weym.outh. 

McIntyre of Quincy. 

COADY of Cambridge. 

White of Groveland. 

ZoLLO of Danvers. 

Tanner of Reading. 

Babineau of Fitchburg. 

* Clerk. 



^oint Standing Committees. 521 



ON PUBLIC HEALTH. 

Sen. Wall of Essex. 

Galvin of Norfolk and Suffolk. 

Sullivan of Norfolk. 

Cutler of Norfolk and Middlesex. 

Rep. Foley of Northampton. 

NoRMANDiN .... of New Bedford. 

Epstein of Boston. 

Kenefick of Lowell. 

Berry of Peabody. 

QuiNN of Spencer. 

Feeney of Boston. 

Armstrong .... of Plymouth. 

Kostanski .... of Montague. 

Flannery of Taunton. 

DeNormandie ... of Lincoln. 



ON PUBLIC SAFETY. 

Sen. Conte of Worcester. 

McKenna of Middlesex. 

Kenneally . . . .of Suffolk, 

Parker of Bristol. 

Ames of Suffolk. 

Rep. Nolen of Ware. 

Cronin of Lawrence. 

Foley of Northampton. 

McGee* of Lynn. 

Walsh of Maiden. 

Cauley of Hoi yoke. 

Bradley of Somerville. 

Turner of Lee. 

Campbell of Wakefield. 

Zelazo of Florida. 

Rosen of Dcdham. 



* Clerk. 



522 



Joint Standing Committees. 



ON PUBLIC SERVICE. 

Sen, Galvin of Norfolk and Suffolk. 

SiLVA of Bristol. 

Burke of Plymouth. 

Hammond of Hampden and Berkshire. 

Rep. Ansel of Boston. 

Foley of Springfield. 

Burke of Natick. 

Del Grosso .... of Revere. 

Sheehan of Boston. 

Cavanaugh .... of Medford. 

Nee of Boston. 

Dukakis* of Brookline. 

MORK of Templeton. 

Rider of Needham. 

Morse of Wareham. 



ON PUBLIC WELFARE. 



Sen. 



Burke . 
Della Russo 
Kenneally 
Cutler 



Rep. Brett . 
Faria . 
Callaghan* 
Finnegan . 
Doyle . 
Harrison . 
Johnson . 
Cataldo . 
Chadwick, 
Frenning . 
Harrington 



of Plymouth. 

of Suffolk. 

of Suffolk. 

of Norfolk and Middlesex. 

of Quincy. 
of Fall River, 
of Pittsfield. 
of Lowell, 
of Boston, 
of Gloucester, 
of Braintree. 
of Franklin, 
of Winchester, 
of Boston, 
of Holden. 



* Clerk. 



Joint Standing Committees. 523 



ON STATE ADMINISTRATION. 

Sen. Kenneally . . . .of Suffolk. 

Benoit of Worcester and Hampden. 

Galvin of Norfolk and Suffolk. 

Jones of Cape and Plymouth. 

Rep. Chmura of Holyoke. 

Navin of Marlborough. 

Mahan of Leominster. 

Hartley of Holyoke. 

Murphy of Boston. 

NoLEN of Ware. 

BocKO* of Billerica. 

Carey of Boston. 

White of Groveland. 

HoLLis of Braintree. 

LoNGWORTH .... of Methuen. 



ON TAXATION. 

Sen. GiBNEY of Worcester. 

Harrington .... of Essex. 

Burke of Plymouth. 

Hammond of Hampden and Berkshire. 

Rep. Catino of Medford. 

Iannello of Boston. 

BoHiGiAN of Worcester. 

McGinn* of Westfield. 

Cronin of Lawrence. 

O'Farrell .... of Maiden. 

O'Brien of Fall River. 

Porter of Agawam. 

SiLVA of Fall River. 

O'Brien of Raynham. 

BuRGESON .... of Brockton. 

* Clerk. 



524 Joint Standing Committees. 



ON TOWNS. 

Sen. Benoit of Worcester and Hampden. 

Long of Middlesex. 

McCoRMACK .... of Norfolk. 

BiSBEE of Franklin and Hampshire. 

Rep. Clark of Easthampton. 

MuLLALY of Millville. 

Lombard of Fitchburg. 

ViGNEAULT .... of Springfield. 

QuiNN of Spencer. 

DoNOHUE of Woburn. 

Landry* of Waltham. 

Waterous .... of Pepperell. 

Harrington .... of Holden. 

Smith of East Longmeadow. 

ROCKETT of Alarbleiiead. 



ON TRANSPORTATION. 

Sen. Umana of Suffolk. 

McKenn.-v of Middlesex. 

Holmes of Norfolk and Plymouth. 

Parker of Bristol. 

Rep. Condon of Boston. 

Carey of Revere. 

W.A.LSH* of Boston. 

RouRKE of Lowell. 

Downey of Brockton. 

Faria of Fall River. 

Gilligan of Lynn. 

Hatch of Beverly. 

Healy of Chariemont. 

MuTHER of Newton. 

Wicher of Marshfield. 

* Clerk. 



Joint Standing Committees. 525 



ON WATER RESOURCES AND WATER SUPPLY. 

Sen. Wall of Essex. 

Z.\ROD of Hampden. 

FONSECA of Bristol. 

Grahari of Essex. 

Rep. Crane of Boston. 

HoMANS of Cambridge. 

Cavanaugh . . . .of Medford. 

Harmon of Boston. 

BoLLiNG of Boston. 

McGlynn of Medford. 

Menton of Water town. 

Manning* of Waltham. 

Eaton of Concord. 

Locke of Wellesley. 

Gammal of Worcester. 

* Clerk. 



526 



List of Members with Committees. 



List of Members of the Senate, with Committees 
of which Each is a Member. 



NAJ/IE. 

Ames, Oliver F. 
Benoit, Paul H. 



Bisbee, Charles A., Jr. 

Burke, James F. 

Conte, John J. . 

Cutler, Leslie B. 
Delia Russo, Harry 

Donahue, Maurice A. 

Fleming, William D. 
Fonseca, Mary L. , 

Foster, A. Frank 
Galvin, Michael J. . 



COMMITTEES. 

. Cities, Election Laws, Labor and 
Industries, Public Safety. 

. Agriculture {Chairman), Counties, 
Highways and Motor Vehicles, 
State Administration, Towns 
{Chairman) . 

. Bills in Third Reading, Civil Service, 
Education, Natural Resources, 
Towns. 

. Counties, Labor and Industries, 
Public Service, Public Welfare 
(Chairman), Taxation. / 

. Banks and Banlting, Cities, Ed^uca- 
tion. Mercantile Affairs, Pu^^ic 
Safety {Chairman) . 

. Aeronautics, Metropolitan Affairs, 
Public Health, Public Welfare. 

. Aeronautics, Metropolitan Affairs 
{Chairman) , Pensions and Old Age 
Assistance, Public Welfare. 

. [Democratic Floor Leader], Rules, 
Labor and Industries {Chairman). 

. Ways and Means {Chairman) . 

. Ways and Means, Education {Chair- 
man) , Water Resources and Water 
Supply. 

, Judiciary {Chairman), Military Af- 
fairs. 

. Constitutional Law, Municipal Fi- 
nance, Pensions and Old Age As- 
sistance, Public Health, Public 
Service {Chairman), State Admin- 
istration. 



List of Members ivith Committees. 



527 



NAME. 

Gibney, Joseph F. . 
Graham, Philip A. . 



Hammond, George D. . 

Harrington, John E., Jr. 

Harrington, Kevin B. . 

Hays, WiUiam E. . 

Hennigan, James W., Jr. 

Hogan, Charles V. . 
Holmes, Newland H. . 
Jones, Allan F. . , . 

Kenneally, George V., Jr. 

Lamson, Fred 

Long, James J. . . . 

McCann, Francis X. 



COMMITTEES. 

Taxation (Chairman). 

[Republican Floor Leader], Rules, 
Military Affairs, Water Resources 
and Water Supply. 

Banks and Banking, Pensions and 
Old Age Assistance, Public Serv- 
ice, Taxation. 

Aeronautics {Chair tnan) , Cities 
{Chairman) , Highways and Motor 
Vehicles, Insurahce, Legal A^airs. 

Education, Election Laws {Chair- 
man), Natural Resources {Chair- 
man), Taxation. 

Ways and Means, Agriculture, Con- 
stitutional Law, Insurance, Judi- 
ciary. 

Waj-s and Means, Banks and Bank- 
ing {Chairman) , Judiciary, IMetro- 
politan Affairs. 

Rules, Ways and Means, Legal Af- 
fairs {Chairman). 

Rules, Ways and Means, Transpor- 
tation, 

Engrossed Bills, Counties, Harbors 
and Public Lands, State Admin- 
istration. 

Civil Service, Election Laws, Public 
Safety, Public Welfare, State Ad- 
ministration {Chairman) . 

Rules, Mercantile Affairs, Municipal 
Finance, Power and Light. 

Engrossed Bills {Chairman), Civil 
Service {Chairman), Military Af- 
fairs, Towns. 

Rules, Ways and Means, Bills in 
Third Reading {Chairman) , Power 
and Light. 



528 



List of Members with CommiUees. 



NAME. 

McCormack, James S. 



McKenna, Denis L. 

Olson, Charles W. . 

Parker. John F. 
Pellegrini, Philibert L. 



Powers, John E. 
Rurak, James P. 



Silva, Antone L. 

St. John, Edmund R., Jr. 
Sullivan, George A., Jr. 



Umana, Mario . 
Wall, William X. . 

Ward, Joseph D. 
Zarod, Stanley J. 



Mer- 

Nat- 



and 



COMMITTEES. 

Aeronautics, Harbors and Public 
Lands, Labor and Industries. Pen- 
sions and Old Age Assistance 
{Chairman) , Towns. 

Engrossed Bills, Civil Service, Mu- 
nicipal Finance {Chairman), Pub- 
lic Safety, Transportation. 

Rules, Harbors and Public Lands 
{Chairman) , Highways and Motor 
Vehicles. 

Ways and Means, Public Safety, 
Transportation. 

Banks and Banking, Cities, 
can tile Affairs {Chairman), 
ural Resources. 

[President], Rules {Chairman). 

Rules, Agriculture, Harbors 
Public Lands, Natural Resources. 
Power and Light {Chairman) . 

Counties {Chairman), Insurance, 
jMercantile Affairs, Public Service. 

Agriculture, Judiciary, Legal Affairs. 

Constitutional Law, Insurance 
{Chairman), Municipal Finance, 
Public Health. 

Ways and Means, Metropolitan Af- 
fairs, Power and Light, Trans- 
portation {Chairmayi). 

Election Laws, Judiciary, Legal Af- 
fairs, Public Health {Chairman), 
Water Resources and Water Sup- 
ply {Chairman). 

Bills in Third Reading, Constitu- 
tional Law {Chairman) , Judiciary, 
Military Affairs {Chairman). 

Rules, Highways and Motor Vehicles 
{Chairman), Water Resources and 
Water Supply. 



List of Members with Committees. 



529 



List of Members of the House of Representatives, 
with Committees of which Each is a Member. 



NAME. 

Anderson, Walter 
Ansel, Julius 



Armstrong, John A. 
Asiaf, Peter George 



COMMITTEES. 

A. 

Mercantile Affairs. 

Pay Roll, Mercantile Affairs (Vice- 
Chairman), Public Service {Chair- 
man) . 

Rules [Assistayit Minority Leader], 
Public Health. 

Agriculture. 



Babineau, Normand J. 
Barrus, John D. 
Bartley, David M. . 
Baumeister, Fred A. 
Beach, Raymond H. 
Bernashe, Roger L. . 
Berry, John T. . 
Bevilacqua, Francis J. 

Bliss, Donald T. 
Bly, Belden G., Jr. 
Bocko, Stanley J. 

Bohigian, Robert J. 



Boiling, Royal L. 

Boynton, Gordon D. 
Bradley, G. Edward 
Bradley, Joseph G. . 
Bresnahan, John C. 
Brett, Joseph E. 

Brothers. Alfred S. . 



Power and Light. 

Natural Resources. 

Education. State Administration. 

Aeronautics, Metropolitan Affairs. 

Rules [Monitor]. 

Rules, Elections. 

Public Health. 

Cities {V ice-Chairman) , Counties 
( V ice-Chairman) . 

Pay Roll, Harbors and Public Lands. 

Ways and Means [Monitor]. 

Agriculture {Chairman) , Counties, 
State Administration {Clerk). 

Highways and Motor Vehicles, Mili- 
'tary Affairs {Vice-Chairman), 
Taxation. 

Natural Resources, Water Resources 
and Water Supply. 

Military Affairs. 

Agriculture, Public Safety. 

Insurance, Aletropolitan Affairs. 

Ways and Means. 

Metropolitan Affairs {Vice-Chair- 
man), Public Welfare {Chairman). 

Cities, Labor and Industries. 



530 



List of Members ivUh Committees. 



NAME. 

Brox, John . 
Buckley, John P. 

Buczko, Thaddeus . 
Buffone, Charles J. . 

Bulger, William M. 
Burgeson, George H. 
Burke, Anthony J. . 

Burke. Walter T. . 
Buttiglieri, Louis 



Callaghan, Patrick E. 
Campbell, Gardner E. 
Campbell, Levin H. 
Carey, Raymond E. 



Carey, William A. . 

Carney, Daniel W. . 

Carney, Philip N. . 

Cartwright,RalphW.,Jr. 
Casey, William J. . 



Cataldo, Paul A. 
Catino, Michael 
Cauley, Emmett J. 

Cavanaugh, Paul J. 

Cawley, Robert L. 



COMMITTEES, 

Agriculture. 

Banks and Banking, Metropolitan 
Affairs (Chairman). 

Pensions and Old Age Assistance. 

Constitutional Law, Labor and In- 
dustries (Clerk). 

Legal Affairs. 

Counties, Taxation. 

Election Laws, Insurance (Vice- 
Chairynan) . 

Public Service. 

Aeronautics (Vice-Chairman), Labor 
and Industries. 

C. 

Public Welfare (Clerk). 

Metropolitan Affairs, Public Safety. 

Agriculture. 

Metropolitan Affairs (Clerk), Trans- 
portation (V ice-Chairman), [Moni- 
tor]. 

Banks and Banking, State Admin- 
istration. 

Constitutional Law, The Judiciary. 

Harbors and Public Lands, Insur- 
ance. 

Ways and Means. 

Labor and Industries (Vice-Chair- 
man), Power and Light (Chair- 
man) . 

Public Welfare. 

Taxation (Chairman), [Monitor]. 

Highways and Motor Vehicles, Pub- 
lic Safety. 

Public Service, Water Resources and 
Water Supply. 

Education, Highways and Motor 
Vehicles. 



List of Members ivith Committees. 



531 



NAME. 

Chadwick, Harrison 
Chase. Perlie Dyar . 
Chmura. Stephen T. 

Clark, John G. . 

Coady, Thomas F., Jr. 
Cohen. Beryl W. . 
Collins, Keith E. 
Colonna. Anthony M. 



Condon, James F. 



Conn, Llo3'd E. . 
Connell, William A., Jr. 
Corcoran, James C, Jr. 
Corliss, Beatrice K. 
Coroa, Gilbert M. . 
Cournoyer, Leo J. . 
Craig, Russell H. 
Crane, Robert Q. 



Craven, James J., Jr. 
Crawford, Wallace B. 
Cronin, John J. . 

Cuffe, Walter A. 

Curtiss, Sidney Q. . 



COMMITTEES. 

Public Welfare. 

Mercantile Affairs. 

Civil Service {Vice-Chairman) , State 
Administration {Chairman). 

Mercantile Affairs, Towns {Chair - 
man). 

Power and Light. 

Harbors and Public Lands. 

Civil Service. 

Bills in the Third Reading {Chalr- 
7nan), Elections, Counties. Munic- 
ipal Finance {Chairman) . 

Bills in the Third Reading {Vice- 
Chairman), Municipal Finance, 
Transportation {Chairman) . 

The Judiciary. 

Power and Light. 

The Judiciary, Legal Affairs. 

Engrossed Bills, Ways and Means. 

Insurance, The Judiciary. 

Ways and Means {Clerk). 

Banks and Banking, Insurance. 

Rules, Elections {Vice-Chairman), 
Election Laws, Water Resources 
and Water Supply {Chairman) . 

Aeronautics. 

Legal Affairs [Monitor]. 

Public Safety {Vice-Chairman), 
Taxation. 

Harbors and Public Lands, Munici- 
pal Finance. 

Rules [Mi7iority Leader], Elections. 



Davenport, Stephen C. 
D'Avolio. Michael A. 

Davoren, John F. X. 



Cities, The Judiciary. 

Banks and Banking {Chairman), The 

Judiciary {Vice-Chairman) . 
Rules [Majority Leader]. 



532 



List of Members with Committees. 



NAME. 

Del Grosso, Joseph . 
Delia Chiesa, Amelio A. 
DeNormandie, James . 
Desrocher, Arthur L. . 

DesRoches, Theophile J. 

Doherty, Gerard F. 
Dolan. John F. . . . 

Donohue, Thomas F. . 
Donovan, John F., Jr. . 
Dower, Harold L. . 
Downey, James P. . 
Doyle, Charles Robert . 
Driscoll, Charles E.Luke 
Dukakis, Michael S. 



Early, Joseph D. 

Eaton, John M., Jr. 
Epstein, Arnold I. . 



Fallon, Thomas F. 



Faria, Manuel . 

Farrell, Thomas F. . 
Feeney, Michael Paul 
Finnegan, Cornelius T. 

Jr. 
Finnegan, William H. 

Fishman, Irving 
Fitzgerald, John J. . 
Flannery, Charles I.. 



COMMITTEES. 

Public Service. 

Cities, Municipal Finance [Monitor], 

Public Health. 

Election Laws, Harbors and Public 
Lands. 

Rules, Pensions and Old Age Assist- 
ance. 

Labor and Industries. 

Elections, Harbors and Public Lands, 
Natural Resources. 

Towns. 

Constitutional Law, Insurance. 

Counties, Education. 

Civil Service {Clerk), Transportation. 

Civil Service, Public Welfare. 

Labor and Industries. 

Public Service {Clerk). 

E. 
Civil Service, Municipal Finance 

{Clerk). 
Water Resources and Water Supply. 
Mercantile Affairs, Public Health. 

F. 

Constitutional Law {Chairman), 
Election Laws, Legal Affairs {Vice- 
Chairman) . 

Municipal Finance, Public Welfare 
( V ice-Chairman) , Transportation. 

Ways and Means. 

Public Health. 

Public Welfare. 

Elections {Chairman), Election Laws 

{Chairman), Ways and Means. 
Pen>;ions and Old Age Assistance. 
Rules, Mercantile Affairs. 
Municipal Finance, Public Health. 



List of Members with Committees. 



533 



NAME. 

Fletcher, Vernon R. 
Flynn, Maurice R., Jr. 
Foley, Bernard J. Pat 



Foley, Jeremiah J. . 
Frenning, John W. . 

Gammal, Albert A., Jr. 
Gilligan, Julie 
Goff, Ernest L., Jr. 

Hahn, Robert C. . . 
Hamilton, David B. 
Harmon, Samuel 



Harrington, Edward D., 

Jr. 
Harrison, David E. 
Hatch, Francis W., Jr. . 
Healy, Winston . 
Hickey, Timothy W. . 
Hollis, Herbert B. . . 
Homans, William P., Jr. 



lannello, Charles 
Ivascyn, John P. 

Janas, John . 
Johnson. Carl R., Jr. 
Joyce, William F. . 



COMMITTEES. 

Banks and Banking, Insurance. 

Aeronautics. 

Banks and Banking, Highways and 

Motor Vehicles, Public Service 

{V ice-Chairman) . 
Agriculture {Vice-Chairman), Public 

Health {Chairman) , Public Safety. 
Public Welfare. 

G. 
Water Resources and Water Supply. 
Transportation. 
Election Laws. 

H. 

Agriculture. 

Constitutional Law. 

Pensions and Old Age Assistance 

{Clerk), Water Resources and 

Water Supply. 
Public Welfare, Towns. 

Public Welfare. 
Transportation. 
Transportation. 
Cities, Counties. 
State Administration. 
Water Resources and Water Supply 
( Vice-Chairman) . 

I. 

Municipal Finance, 

Chairman) . 
Ways and Means. 

J. 

Education. 
Public Welfare. 
Constitutional Law 
( V ice-Chairman) , 



Taxation {Vice- 



Election Laws 
Legal Affairs. 



534 



List of Members with Committees. 



NAME. 

Kearney, Joseph M. 
Kelly, James A., Jr. 
Kelly, James H. 
Kenefick, Archibald E. 

Kennedy, John P. . 
Khachadoorian, 

Gregory B. 
Kiernan, Cornelius F. 
Kimball, Philip K. . 
Kingston, William J. 
Kirby, Edward P. . 
Klebanow, Benjamin 

Koplow, Freyda P. . 
Kostanski, Walter T. 
Kramer, Albert . 
Kulig, Mitsie T. 
Kuss, Matthew J. . 



COMMITTEES 



K. 



Cities, Metropolitan Affairs. 

Natural Resources. 

Ways and Means. 

Pensions and Old Age Assistance, 

Public Health. 
Agriculture. 
Pensions and Old Age Assistance. 

Municipal Finance {Vice-Chairman) . 

Insurance, The Judiciar^^ 

W'ays and Means {Vice-Chairman). 

The Judiciary. 

Highways and Motor Vehicles, 

Labor and Industries. 
Pensions and Old Age Assistance. 
Natural Resources, Public Health. 
Natural Resources. 
Cities, Election Laws. 
Cities, Education. 



Landry, Richard E. 
Langone,JosephA.,3rd. . 

Lemos, Frank F. 

Locke, David H. 
Lombard, Gerald P. 
Long, John J. . 

Longworth, William 

MacLean, William Q., Jr. 
Mahan, J. Robert . 



Towns {Clerk). 

Banks and Banking {Vice-Chair- 
man), Metropolitan Affairs. 

Aeronautics {Chairman), Counties, 
Highways and Motor Vehicles. 

Water Resources and Water Supply. 

Military Affairs {Chairman) , Towns. 

Rules, Highways and Motor Vehicles 
( Vice-Chairman) {Clerk) . 

State Administration. 

M. 
Harbors and Public Lands {Vice- 

Chair?nan) {Clerk). 
Highways and Motor Vehicles 

{Chairman) , State Administration 

[Monitor], 



List of Members ivith Committees. 



535 



NAME. 

Manning, Donald J. 

McEvoy, Joseph F., Jr. 

McGee, Thomas W. 
McGinn, Robert J. . . 

McGlynn, John J. . 

McGuane, Allan 

Mclntyre, James R. 
McKenna, Arthur J. 
Mendonca, George G, . 

Menton, Paul C. . . 

Moran, William J. . 
Mork. William H. . . 

Morrissey, Gerald J. 
[Morrow, Edward S. 
Morse, Edwin H. 
Mullaly, Charles A., Jr. 

Mullen, James G. . 
Murphy, Paul . 

Murphy, Paul Maurice 
Murray, Cornelius J. . 
Muther, Lorenz F, Jr. . 

Navin, John J. . , . 



Nazzaro, Michael A. 
Nee, Patrick W. 



Jr. 



COMMITTEES. 

Water Resources and Water Supply 
(Clerk). 

Banks and Banking, Insurance 
(Chairman) . 

Insurance, Public Safety (Clerk). 

Mercantile Affairs (Clerk), Taxation 
(Clerk). 

Agriculture, Water Resources and 
Water Supply. 

Constitutional Law, Education 
(Chairman), Insurance. 

Power and Light. 

Civil Service, Labor and Industries. 

Civil Service (Chairman) , Highways 
and Motor Vehicles. 

Military Affairs, Water Resources 
and Water Supply. 

Counties. 

Highways and Motor Vehicles, Pub- 
lic Service. 

Civil Service, Metropolitan Affairs. 

Counties, Mercantile Affairs. 

Public Service. 

Counties (Chairman), Towns (Vice- 
Chairman) . 

Aeronautics, Military Affairs. 

Banks and Banking, State Admin- 
istration. 

Aeronautics. 

Rules. 

Transportation. 

N. 

Engrossed Bills (Chairman), Pay 
Roll (Chairman), State Adminis- 
tration (Vice-Chairman). 

Banks and Banking. 

Natural Resources, Public Service. 



536 



Lsit of Members with Committees. 



NAME. 

Newman, Mary B. . 
Newth, Thomas M. 
Nolen, James R. 

Normandin, Leo J. . 



COMMITTEES. 

Aeronautics. 

Legal Affairs. 

Public Safety {Chairma7i), State Ad- 
ministration. 

Harbors and Public Lands {Chair- 
man), Public Health (Vice-Chair- 
0. 



O'Brien, James A. 



O'Brien, Walter W. 

O'Connor, David J. 
O'Farrell, George H. 



Otis, William F. 



O. 

Constitutional Law {Vice-Chair- 
man), Harbors and Public Lands, 
Taxation. 

Natural Resources (Clerk), Taxa- 
tion. 

Rules, Metropolitan Affairs. 

Engrossed Bills (Vice-Chairman), 
Mercantile Affairs (Chairynan), 
Taxation. 

Constitutional Law. 



Pasciucco, Domenick S. Mercantile Affairs, Power and Light. 



Pettoruto, Albert P. 
Pigaga, Vite J. . 

Pope, Lincoln G., Jr. 
Porter, George W. . 



Pensions and Old Age Assistance. 
Education, Pensions and Old Age 

Assistance (V ice-Chairman) . 
Rules. 
Civil Service, Taxation. 



Quinn. Philip A. 
Quinn, Robert H. 



Randall, William L 

Reed, Paul D., Jr. 
Reynolds, Leo J. 



Public Health, Towns. 
Rules [Majority Whip], 

R. 

Bills in the Third Reading, Munici- 
pal Finance. 
Aeronautics (Clerk). 
Rules, Elections. 



List of Members luith Committees. 



537 



NAME. 

Rico. Frank G. . 

Rider, Daniel H. 
Rockett, J. Hilary . 
Rosen, Harold E. 
Rosenfeld, Nathan . 
Rourke, Raj^mond F. 



COAEMITTEES. 

Counties, Natural Resources {Chair- 
man) . 

Public Service. 

Towns. 

Public Safety. 

Labor and Industries. 

Power and Light {Clerk), Trans- 
portation. '\ 



Sacco, George L., Jr. 
Sala. Roger A. . 
Saulnier, Joseph D. 
Scibelli, Anthony M. 
Shanley, Vincent J. 
Shea, Charles L. 



Sheehan, Thomas A. 
Shrigley, Alfred R. . 
Sigourney, Andre R. 
Silva, Milton R. 

Simonelli, Michael J. 
Simons, Saul 
Smith, George T. 
Smith, Lawrence P. 
Spartichino. George W. 
Spatcher, George L 
Starr, Janet K. . . 
Stone, C. Clifford . 
Sylvia, Joseph A. 



S. 

Education {Clerk), Legal Affairs. 

Ways and Means [Monitor]. 

Pensions and Old Age Assistance. 

Ways and Means. 

Cities {Clerk), Municipal Finance. 

Harbors and Public Lands, Pensions 
and Old Age Assistance {Chair- 
man) . 

Civil Service, Public Service. 

i>lilitary Affairs [Minor ily Whip]. 

^Military Affairs. 

Highways and Motor Vehicles, Taxa- 
tion. 

Ways and Means. 

Legal Affairs. 

Towns. 

Agriculture. 

Natural Resources. 

Labor and Industries. 

-Agriculture {Clerk) . 

Ways and Means. 

Harbors and Public Lands. 



Tanner, Frank D. . 
Thompson, John F. 
Thomson, George B. 



Military Affairs, Power and Light. 
[Speaker], Rules {Chairman). 
Cities. 



538 



List of Members with Committees. 



Toomey, John J. 
Travaline, Joseph T. 

Turner, Henry A. . 
Turner, Warren A. . 
Turo, Leo J. 
Tynan, John T. 



COMMITTEES. 

Ways and Means (Chairman) . 
Constitutional Law (Clerk), The 

Judiciary. 
Civil Service. 

Military Affairs, Public Safety. 
Cities (Chairman) , Election Laws. 
Military Affairs, Power and Light 

( Vice-Chairman) . 



Vaitses, Theodore J. 
Vigneault, Dave N. 



Walsh, George B. 
Walsh, Joseph B. 

Walsh, Martin H. 



Wdterous, Chester H. . 
Weekes, Stephen 
Weinberg, Norman S. . 
Wheeler, James G. . 
White, Benjamin H. 

White, Thomas M. . . 
Whittemore, John W. . 
Wicher, Harold H. . . 
Williams, Arthur 
Wojtkowski, Thomas C. 



The Judiciary, Legal Affairs. 
Towns. 

W. 

Election Laws, Public Safety. 

Military Affairs (Clerk), Transporta- 
tion (Clerk). 

Labor and Industries (Chair-man), 
Natural Resources (Vice-Chair- 
man) . 

Education, Towns. 

Aeronautics. 

Legal Affairs (Chairman). 

Mercantile Affairs, Power and Light, 

State Administration. 
Aeronautics. 

Election Laws, Metropolitan Affairs. 
Transportation. 
Constitutional Law. 
Education (V ice-Chairman), The 

Judiciary (Chairman). 



Zabriskie, Albert H. 
Zelazo, Edward S. 
Zollo, Paul G. . 



Ways and Means. 
Public Safety. 
Power and Light. 



RULES OF THE SENATE. 



RULES OF THE SENATE. 
[As finally adopted on January 10, 1963.] 



[The dates under each rule indicate when the rule and its amendments 
were adopted. 

The date 1817 denotes the time when the several rules against which 
it is placed were first preserved. Previously to that year these rules are 
not to be found, although from the Senate Journal it appears that they 
were printed. 

Numbers enclosed in parentheses following each rule indicate the 
corresponding House rule.] 

The President. 

1. The President shall take the chair at the hour 
to which the Senate stands adjourned, shall call the 
members to order, and, on the appearance of a quo- 
rum, shall proceed to business. (1.) 

[1831; 1888.] 

2. The President shall preserve order and decorum, 
may speak to points of order in preference to other 
members, and shall decide all questions of order sub- 
ject to an appeal to the Senate. (2.) He shall rise to 
put a question, or to address the Senate, but may read 
sitting. (5.) 

[1817; between 1821 and 1826; 1831; 1888.] 

3. The President may vote on all questions. (4.) 

[1826.] 

4. The President may appoint a member to per- 
form the duties of the chair for a period not exceeding 
three days at anv one time. (7.) 

[1831; 1862; 1865; 1888.] 

5. In case of a vacancy in the office of President, 
or in case the President, or the member appointed by 

541 



542 Rules of the Senate. 

him to perform the duties of the chair, is absent /"at 
the hour to which the Senate stands adjourned, the 
eldest senior member present shall call the Senate to 
order, and shall preside until a President, or a Presi- 
dent pro tempore, is elected by ballot, and such elec- 
tion shall be the first business in order. (8.) 
[1831; 1885; 1888.] 



Clerk. 

6. The Clerk shall keep a journal of the proceed- 
ings of the Senate, and shall cause the same to be 
printed daily. (11.) He shall, in the journal, make 
note of all questions of order, and enter at length the 
decisions thereon. He shall insert in an appendix to 
the journal the rules of the Senate and the joint rules 
of the two branches. (12.) 

[1882; 1888.] 

7. The Clerk shall prepare and cause to be printed 
each day a calendar of matters in order for considera- 
tion ; and shall include on Mondays and on such other 
days as he shall deem necessary a list of matters lying 
on the table; and such other memoranda as he may 
deem necessary, and as the Senate or the President 
may direct. (13.) 

[1882; 1888; 1945.] 

8. The Clerk shall retain bills and other papers, in 
reference to which any member has a right to move a 
reconsideration (except petitions, bills and resolves 
introduced on leave, orders, reports of committees 
asking to be discharged from the further considera- 
tion of a subject, matters which have been recom- 
mitted under joint rule 5 and engrossed bills and re- 
solves) until the right of reconsideration has expired; 



Rules of the Senate. 543 

provided, that the operation of this rule shall be sus- 
pended during the last week of the session. (15, 57.) 
[1855; 1856; 1875; 1882; 1885; 1888; 1891; 
1919; 1921; 1943; 1946.] 

9. When a bill or resolve coming from the other 
branch does not appear in print in the form in which 
it was passed in that branch, the Clerk shall either in- 
dicate the amendments on the Orders of the Day, or 
shall have the bill or resolve reprinted, at his dis- 
cretion. 

[1882.] 



Members of the Senate. 

10. No member shall be permitted to act on a 
committee or to vote upon a question in which his 
private right, distinct from the public interest, is im- 
mediatelv concerned. (24, 63.) 

[1855; 1888; 1889.] 

11. No member shall absent himself from the 
Senate without leave, unless there is a quorum without 
his presence. (17.) 

[1817.] 



Committees. 



12. The following standing committees shall be 
appointed at the beginning of the political year, to 
wit: — 

A committee on Rules; 
To consist of the President and nine other members. 

A committee on Ways and Means; 
To consist of nine members. 



544 Rules of the Senate. 

A committee on Bills in the Third Reading; 
A committee on Engrossed Bills; 
Each to consist of three members. (20.) 

[1831; 1836; 1840; 1844; 1847; 1863; 1864; 
1870; 1876; 1882; 1885; 1886; 1888; 1891; 
1896; 1897; 1920; 1937; 1939; 1941; 1945; 
1946; 1957; 1960; 1963.] 

13. Committees shall be appointed by the Presi- 
dent, unless the Senate shall otherwise specially order, 
and the member first named upon a committee shall 
be its chairman. (21.) In case of the election of a 
committee by ballot, the member having the highest 
number of votes shall act as chairman. (22.) 

[1817; between 1821 and 1826; 1831; 1888.] 

13a. All motions or orders authorizing committees 
of the Senate to travel or to employ stenographers, 
all propositions involving special investigations by 
committees of the Senate and all motions or orders 
providing that information be transmitted to the Sen- 
ate shall be referred without debate to the committee 
on Rules, who shall report thereon, recommending 
what action should be taken. All other motions that 
create main questions, except those that relate to priv- 
ilege, to procedure and kindred matters, or to the sub- 
jects referred to in joint rules 29 and 30, shall also be 
referred without debate to the committee on Rules 
and be treated in like manner. (104.) 
[1904; 1913: 1921; 1953.] 

14. No committee shall be allowed to occupy the 
Senate Chamber without a vote of the Senate. (100.) 

[1836; 1863; 1888.] 



Rules of the Senate. 545 

15. No legislation affecting the rights of indi- 
viduals or the rights of a private or municipal cor- 
poration, otherwise than as it affects generally the 
people of the whole Commonwealth or the people of 
the city or town to which it specifically applies, shall 
be proposed or introduced except by a petition, nor 
shall any bill or resolve embodying such legislation be 
reported by a committee, except upon a petition duly 
referred, nor shall such a bill or resolve be reported by 
a committee, whether on an original reference or on a 
recommittal with instructions to hear the parties, 
until it is made to appear to the satisfaction of the 
committee that proper notice of the proposed legisla- 
tion has been given by public advertisement or other- 
wise to all parties interested, without expense to the 
Commonwealth, or until evidence satisfactory to the 
committee is produced that all parties interested have 
in writing waived notice. A committee reporting leave 
to withdraw or reference to the next annual session 
for want of proper notice or of a waiver thereof shall 
set forth this fact in its report, and no bill or resolve 
shall be in order as a substitute for, or amendm.ent of, 
such report. Objection to the violation of this rule 
may be taken at any stage prior to that of the third 
reading. (31.) 

[1870; 1871; 1885; 1890; 1921; 1939; 1945.] 

16. When the object of an application, whether by 
petition, or bill or resolve introduced on leave, can be 
secured under existing laws, or, without detriment to 
the public interests, by a general law, the committee 
to whom the matter is referred shall report leave to 
withdraw, ought not to pass, or a general law, as the 
case may be. (30.) 

[1882; 1885; 1888; 1891; 1893.] 



546 Rules of the Senate. 

Form of Bills and Resolves. 

17. Bills and resolves shall be presented in a legible 
form without material erasures or interlineations, on 
not less than one sheet of paper, with suitable m.argins 
and spaces between the several sections or resolves. 
Bills amending existing laws shall not provide for 
striking words from, or inserting words in, such laws, 
unless such course is the best calculated to show clearly 
the subject and nature of the amendment. No repealed 
law and no law which has expired by limitation, and 
no part of any such law, shall be re-enacted by reference 
merelv. (42'.) 

[1844; 1857; 1880; 1882; 1885; 1888; 1889; 
1947.] 

Introduction of Business. 

18. Every member presenting a petition, micmo- 
rial, or remonstrance, shall endorse his name thereon, 
and a brief statement of the nature and object of the 
instrument; and the reading of the instrument shall 
be dispensed with, unless specially ordered. (37.) 

[1831; 1888.] 

19. All motions contemplating legislation shall be 
founded upon petition or upon bill or resolve pro- 
posed to be introduced on leave. Committees to whom 
messages from the Governor, reports of State officers, 
boards, commissions, and others authorized to report 
to the Legislature shall be referred, may report by bill 
or otherwise such legislation as may be germane to the 
subject-matter referred to them. (40.) 

[1858; 1888; 1891; 1893.] 

20. All petitions for legislation accompanied by 
bills or resolves embodying the subject-matter prayed 
for, which are intended for presentation or introduction 



Rules of the Senate. 547 

to the Senate, bills and resolves proposed for introduc- 
tion on leave, reports of State officials, departments, 
commissions and boards, and reports of special com- 
mittees and commissions shall be filed with the Clerk, 
who shall, unless they be subject to other provisions 
of these rules or of the rules of the two branches, refer 
them, with the approval of the President, to the appro- 
priate committees, subject to such change of refer- 
ence as the Senate may make. 

Provided, that petitions and other papers so filed, 
or papers received from the House, which are subject 
to the provisions of joint rule of 7a, 7b, 7c, 9 or 12, 
shall be referred by the Clerk to the committee on 
Rules. The reading of all such documents may be dis- 
pensed with, but they shall be entered in the journal 
of the same or the next legislative day after such refer- 
ence, except as provided in joint rule 13. 

x^ll orders and resolutions intended for adoption 
shall be deposited with the Clerk. If they relate to 
questions of privilege or to procedure and kindred 
matters, they shall be laid before the Senate b}^ the 
President as soon as may be. If they relate to other 
subjects, except as provided in rule 13a or in joint 
rules 29 and 30, they shall be inspected by the com- 
mittee on Rules and laid before the Senate not later 
than the fourth legislative day succeeding the day of 
their deposit with the committee. 

Special reports of State officials, departments, com- 
missions and boards, reports of special committees and 
commissions, bills and resolves introduced on leave or 
accompanying petitions and reports, and resolutions, 
shall be printed on order of the President, and under 
the direction of the Clerk. They shall retain, during 
all subsequent stages, their original numbers and shall 
also bear such new numbers as may be necessary. 



548 Rules of the Senate. 

Matters which have been placed on file, or which 
have been referred during the preceding year to the 
next annual session, may be taken from the files by 
the Clerk upon request of any Senator or Senator- 
elect; and matters so taken from the files shall be re- 
ferred or otherwise disposed of as provided for above. 

The Senate may at any time by order make any 
other disposition of petitions and remonstrances in the 
hands of the Clerk. Petitions and remonstrances relat- 
ing to matters already sent to committees shall be by 
the President referred to the appropriate committees. 
(28.) 

[1891; 1893; 1894; 1916; 1921; 1925; 1927; 
1933; 1939; 1945; 1953; 1963.] 

21. [Omitted in 1943.] 

22. [Omitted in 1949.] 

23. No bill or resolve shall be proposed or intro- 
duced unless received from the House of Representa- 
tives, reported by a committee, or moved as an amend- 
ment to the report of a committee, except that special 
leave may be granted to a member to introduce a bill 
or resolve, and such bill or resolve shall thereupon be 
referred to the proper committee for consideration and 
report. (47.) 

[1881; 1882; 1888.] 

24. The consideration of any order proposed for 
adoption, or of any request for leave to introduce a 
bill or resolve, or of any motion to suspend Senate 
Rule 15, or joint rule 8, 9 or 12, shall be postponed 
without question to the day after that on which the 
order is proposed or request made, if any member asks 
such postponement. (41.) 

[1885; 1891.] 



25 

cov 



Rules of the Senate. 549 

25. [Omitted in 1929, the provisions thereof being 
/ered by Joint Rule 9.] (32.) 



Course of Proceedings. 

26. Bills and resolves from the House, after they 
are read a first time, shall be referred to a committee 
of the Senate, unless they have been reported by a 
joint committee or substituted for the report of a 
joint committee. (45.) Bills and resolves reported in 
the Senate, and bills and resolves from the House 
reported by joint committees or substituted for the 
reports of joint committees, shall, after they have 
been read once, be placed in the Orders of the Day 
for the next day for a second reading without a ques- 
tion, except as otherwise provided by rule 27. Bills 
introduced by initiative petition, when reported in the 
Senate or received from the House, shall be placed in 
the Orders of the Day for the next day, the question 
being "upon the enactment of such law in the form in 
which it stands in such petition ". Resolutions received 
from the House, or introduced or reported in the Sen- 
ate, shall be read and, pending the question on their 
adoption, shall be placed in the Orders of the Day for 
the next day. (56.) 

[1825; 1885; 1888; 1890; 1891; 1897; 1945.] 

27. Bills and resolves involving public money, or 
a grant of public property, unless the subject-matter 
has been acted upon by the joint committee on Ways 
and Means, shall, after the first reading, be referred in 
course to the Senate committee on Ways and Means, 
whose duty it shall be to report on their relation to the 
finances of the Commonwealth. [See Rule 36.] 



550 Rides of the Senate. 

Orders reported in the Senate or received from the 
House involving the expenditure of public money for 
special committees shall, before the question is taken 
on the adoption thereof, be referred to the Senate com- 
mittee on Ways and Means, whose duty it shall be to 
report on their relation to the finances of the Com- 
monwealth. 

Bills and resolves involving an expenditure of count}' 
money shall, after their first reading, be referred to the 
committee on Counties on the part of the Senate, for 
report on their relation to the finances of the county 
affected, unless the subject-matter thereof has been 
previously acted upon by the joint committee on 
Counties. 

Bills and resolves involving a substantial expenditure 
of city or town money shall, after their first reading, be 
referred to the comm.ittee on Municipal Finance on the 
part of the Senate for report on their relation to the 
finances of the city or town affected, unless the subject- 
matter thereof has been previously acted upon by the 
joint committee on Municipal Finance. (44.) 

[1871; 1882; 1887; 1888; 1889; 1896; 1921; 
1941; 1946; 1947; 1953; 1963.] 

28. No bill or resolve shall pass to be engrossed 
without three readings on three several days. (51.) 

[1817; 1836; 1841; 1859; 1878; 1881; 1882; 
1885.] 

29. Bills and resolves, in their several readings, and 
resolutions, shall be read by their titles, unless objec- 
tion is made. (48.) 

[1817; 1836; 1841; 1859; 1878; 1881; 1882; 
1885; 1890.] 

30. If a committee to whom a bill or resolve is re- 
ferred report that the same ought not to pass, the 



Rules of the Senate. 551 

question shall be "Shall this bill (or resolve) be re- 
jected?" and if such committee report recommending 
that the same be referred to the next annual session, 
the question shall be "Shall this bill (or resolve) be re- 
ferred to the next annual session?". If the rejection or 
the recommendation of reference to the next annual 
session is negatived, the bill or resolve, if it has been 
read but once, shall go to its second reading without 
a question; and if it has been read more than once it 
shall be placed in the Orders of the Day for the next 
day, pending the question on ordering to a third read- 
ing, or engrossment, as the case may be. (43.) 

[1817; 1836; 1841; 1859; 1878; 1881, 1882; 
1885; 1897; 1921; 1939; 1945.] 

31. If an amendment is made at the second or 
third reading of a bijl or resolve, substantially chang- 
ing the greater part thereof, the question shall not be 
put forthwith on ordering the bill or resolve to a third 
reading or to be engrossed, as the case may be, but 
the bill or resolve, as amended, shall be placed in 
the Orders of the next day after that on which the 
amendment is made, and shall then be open to further 
amendment before such question is put. In like man- 
ner, when an amendment is made in any proposition 
of such a nature as to change its character, as from a 
bill to an order, or the like, the proposition as amended 
shall be placed in the Orders of the next day after that 
on which the amendment was made. (62.) 

[1882; 1888.] 

32. Bills or resolves ordered to a third reading 
shall be placed in the Orders for the next day for such 
reading. (58.) 

[1817; 1836; 1841; 1859; 1878; 1881; 1882; 
1885.1 



552 Rules oj the Senate. 

33. Bills and resolves when ordered to a third 
reading, and bills and resolves amended subsequently 
to their third reading unless the amendment was re- 
ported by the committee on Bills in the Third Read- 
ing, shall be referred forthwith to that committee, 
which shall examine and correct them, for the pur- 
pose of avoiding repetitions and unconstitutional 
provisions, and insuring accuracy in the text and ref- 
erences, and consistency with the language of existing 
statutes, and of giving effect to the provisions of sec- 
tion fifty-two of chapter three of the General Laws; 
but any change in the sense or legal effect, or any 
material change in construction, shall be reported to 
the Senate as an amendment. The committee may 
consolidate into one bill any two or more related bills 
referred to it, whenever legislation may be simplified 
thereby. Resolutions received from and adopted by 
the House or introduced or reported into the Senate, 
after they are read and before they are adopted, and 
amendments of bills, resolves and resolutions adopted 
by the House and sent to the Senate for concurrence, 
shall also be referred, in like manner, to the committee 
on Bills in the Third Reading. When a bill, resolve or 
resolution has been so referred, no further action shall 
be taken until report thereon has been made by the 
committee. If a bill or resolve referred to the com- 
mittee on Bills in the Third Reading contains an emer- 
gency preamble, or if it provides for the borrowing of 
money by the Commonwealth and comes within the 
provisions of section 3 of Article LXH of the Amend- 
ments of the Constitution, the committee shall plainly 
indicate the fact on the outside of the bill or resolve, or 
on a wrapper or label attached thereto. (26, 50.) 

[1817; 1836; 1882; 1888; 1890; 1891; 1914; 
1919; 1925; 1927; 1929; 1945.] 



Rules of the Senate. 553 

34. Engrossed bills and resolves shall be referred 
to the committee on Engrossed Bills, whose duty it 
shall be carefully to compare the same with the bills 
or resolves as passed to be engrossed; and, if found 
by them to be rightly and truly engrossed, they shall 
so endorse on the envelope thereof; and the question 
of enactment or final passage or of adopting an emer- 
gency preamble shall be taken thereon without further 
reading, unless specially ordered. When an engrossed 
bill or resolve contains an emergency preamble or 
when it provides for the borrowing of money by the 
Commonwealth and comes within the provisions of 
section 3 of Article LXII of the Amendments of the 
Constitution, the committee on Engrossed Bills shall 
plainlv indicate the fact on the envelope thereof. 
(27, 52, 54.) 

[1817; 1831; 1882; 1888; 1914; 1919.] 



Orders of the Day. 

35. The unfinished business in which the Senate 
was engaged at the time of the last adjournment shall 
have the preference in the Orders of the Day next 
after motions to reconsider. (60.) 

[1830; 1870.] 

36. Reports of committees not by bill or resolve 
shall be placed in the Orders of the . next day after 
that on which they are made to the Senate or received 
from the House, as the case may be; except that the 
report of a committee asking to be discharged from 
the further consideration of a subject, and recommend- 
ing that it be referred to another committee, shall be 
immediately considered. Amendments to a measure, 
which have been made by the House and sent back to 



554 Rules of the Senate. 

the Senate for concurrence, shall be placed in the 
Orders of the next day after that on which they are 
received; provided, that amendments involving the 
expenditure of state money shall be referred to the 
committee on Ways and Means, amendments in\'olving 
the expenditure of county money shall be referred to 
the committee on Counties on the part of the Senate, 
and amendments involving a substantial expenditure 
of city or town money shall be referred to the committee 
on Municipal Finance on the part of the Senate. 

Reports of committees on proposals for amend- 
ment of the Constitution shall be dealt with in ac- 
cordance with the provisions of Joint Rule No. 23. 
(46, 57.) 

[1845; 1853; 1888; 1891; 1919; 1947; 1953.] 

37. After entering upon the consideration of the 
Orders of the Day, the Senate shall proceed with them 
in regular course, as follows: Matters not giving rise 
to a motion or debate shall first be disposed of in the 
order in which they stand in the calendar; then the 
matters that were passed over shall be considered and 
disposed of in like order. (59.) 

[1817; 1836; 1841; 1859; 1878; 1882; 1885.] 

38. No matter which has been duly placed in the 
Orders of the Day shall be discharged therefrom or 
considered out of its regular course. (61.) 

[1885.] 



Rules of Debate. 



39. Every member, when he speaks, shall stand in 
his place and address the President. (73.) 
[1817; 1831; 1871.] 



FmUs of the Senate. 555 

40. When nro or more members rise to speak at 
the same time, the Presid^it shall deagnate the mem- 
ber who is entitled to the floor. ("74. ") 

[1831: 18«8.] 

41. No member shall speak more than once to the 
prevention of any other member who has not spoken 
and deares to speak on the same question. (76.) 

[1817: 1SS6.] 

42. Xo member shall interrupt another while speak- 
ing, except bv rising to call to order. (75.) 

[1817:' 1831.] 

43. .^fter a question is put to vote no member 
shall speak to it. 

[1817.] 



Moncxs. 

44. Any motion shall be reduced to writing, if the 
Preadent so directs. (77.) A motion need not be 
seconded and may be withdrawn by the mo\-er if no 
obiection is made. (78.') 

[1817; 1844; 1871; 1888.] 

45. A question containing two or more propor- 
tions, capable of di\-iaon, shall be di\-ided whene\"er 
desired by any member. When a motion to strike 
out and insert is thus di\-ided, the failure of the motion 
to strike out shall not preclude amendment: cr, if 
the motion to strike out pre%'ails, the matter proposed 
to be inserted shall be open to amendment before the 
question is taken on inserring it. (^1.^ 

[1817: 1841; 1SS8.] 

46. When a quesrion is under debate the Preadent 
shall receiN-e no motion that does not relate to the 



556 Rules of the Senate. 

same, except a motion to adjourn or some other motion 
which has precedence by express rule of the Senate, 
or because it is privileged in its nature; and he shall 
receive no motion relating to the same except: — 

(1) To lay on the table; 

(2) To close debate at a specified time; 

(3) To postpone to a day certain; 

(4) To commit (or recommit) ; 

(5) To amend; 

(6) To refer to the next annual session; or 

(7) To postpone indefinitely. 

These motions shall have precedence in the order in 
which they stand. (80.) 

[Between 1821 and 1826; 1831; 1844; 1870; 
1882; 1885; 1888; 1921; 1939; 1945.] 

47. Debate may be closed at any time not less 
than one hour from the adoption of a motion to that 
effect. On this motion not more than ten minutes 
shall be allowed for debate, and no member shall speak 
more than three minutes. (85.) 

[1882.] 

48. When motions are made to refer a subject to 
different committees, the committees proposed shall 
be considered in the following order: — 

(1) A standing committee of the Senate; 

(2) A special committee of the Senate ; 

(3) A joint standing committee of the two branches; 

(4) A joint special committee of the two branches. 
(88.) 

[1884; 1888.] 

49. No engrossed bill or resolve shall be amended; 
but this rule shall not apply to a bill or resolve re- 



Rules of the Senate. 557 

turned by the Governor with a recommendation of 
amendment in accordance with the provisions of 
Article LVI of the Amendments of the Constitution; 
nor shall it apply to amendments of engrossed bills 
proposed by the House and sent to the Senate for 
concurrence. (53.) 

[1837; 1919; 1931.] 

50. No motion or proposition of a subject difTer- 
ent from that under consideration shall be admitted 
under the color of an amendment. (90.) 

[1882.] 

51. In filling blanks the largest sum and longest 
time shall be put first. (87, 92.) 

[1882.] 

52. The motion to adjourn, and the call for yeas 
and nays, shall be decided without debate. On the 
motions to lay on the table and take from the table, 
to postpone to a time certain, to commit or recommit 
(except with instructions), not exceeding ten minutes 
shall be allowed for debate, and no member shall speak 
more than three minutes. (69, 79.) 

On a motion to reconsider not exceeding thirty min- 
utes shall be allowed for debate, and no member shall 
speak more than five minutes; but on a motion to 
reconsider a vote upon any subsidiary, incidental or 
dependent question debate shall be limited to ten min- 
utes, and no member shall speak more than three min- 
utes. (72.) 

On a motion to suspend any of the joint rules or Sen- 
ate rules debate shall be limited to fifteen minutes, and 
no member shall speak more than three minutes. (102.) 
[1817; 1859; 1870; 1874; 1882; 1885; 1937; 
1941.1 



558 Rules of the Senate. 

Reconsideration. 

53. No motion to reconsider a vote shall be enter- 
tained unless it is made on the same day on which the 
vote has passed, or on the next day thereafter on which 
a quorum is present and before the Orders of the Day 
for that day have been taken up. If reconsideration is 
moved on the same day, the motion shall (except dur- 
ing the last week of the session) be placed first in the 
Orders of the Day for the succeeding day; but, if it is 
moved on the succeeding day, the motion shall be con- 
sidered forthwith: provided, however, that this rule 
shall not prevent the reconsideration of a vote on a 
subsidiary, incidental or dependent question at any 
time when the main question to which it relates is 
under consideration ; and provided, further, that a mo- 
tion to reconsider a vote on any incidental, subsidiary 
or dependent question shall not remove the main sub- 
ject under consideration from before the Senate, but 
shall be considered at the time when it is made. (70.) 

There shall be no reconsideration of the vote on the 
question on adjourning, for the yeas and nays, on lay- 
ing on the table or on taking from the table; and when 
a motion for reconsideration has been decided, that 
decision shall not be reconsidered. (71.) 

[1817; between 1821 and 1826; 1858; 1885; 
1888; 1891; 1902; 1946.1 



Rejected Measures. 

54. When any measure has been finally rejected, no 
measure substantially the same shall be introduced by 
any committee or member during the session. (49.) 

[1817; dispensed with in 1831, and revived in 
1838; amended in 1841; 1844; 1877; 1882.1 



Rules of the Senate. 559 

Voting. 

55. The President shall declare all votes; but if a 
member doubts a vote, the President shall order a re- 
turn of the number voting in the affirmative, and in 
the negative, without further debate. (3, 66.) 

[1831; 1888.] 

56. When a member moves that a question be 
taken by yeas and nays, the President shall take the 
sense of the Senate in that manner, provided one- 
fifth of the members present so direct. If, before the 
question is taken, a member states to the Senate that 
he has paired with another member and how each 
would vote on the pending question, the fact shall be 
entered on the journal immediately after the record of 
the yeas and nays, and such member shall be excused 
from voting. (68.) 

[1817; 1852; 1888.] 

57. Whenever a question is taken by yeas and 
nays, the Clerk shall call the names of all the members, 
except the President, in alphabetical order, and every 
member present shall answer to his name, unless ex- 
cused before the vote is taken; and no member shall 
be permitted to vote after the decision is announced 
from the chair. (64, 68.) 

[1837; 1844.] 



Elections by Ballot. 

58. In all elections by ballot a time shall be assigned 
for such election, at least one day previous thereto, 
except in case of an election of President or President 
pro tempore, under the provisions of Rule 5. (96.) 
[1831; 1891.] 



560 Rules of the Senate. 



Reporters' Gallery. 

59. Subject to the approval and direction of the 
committee on Rules during the session and of the 
President after prorogation, the use of the reporters' 
gallery of the Senate Chamber shall be under the con- 
trol of the organization of legislative reporters known 
as the Massachusetts State House Press Association. 
Except in the employ of the newspaper or publication 
which he represents as a legislative reporter, no per- 
son who is entitled to the privileges of the reporters' 
galler>^ shall seek to influence the action of the Senate 
or any member thereof, nor shall such person approach 
a member to seek to influence him in any place from 
which legislative agents are excluded by Rule 61. 
Every legislative reporter desiring admission to the 
reporters' gallery of the Senate Chamber shall state in 
writing that he is not the agent or representative of 
any person or corporation interested in legislation be- 
fore the General Court, and will not act as representa- 
tive of any such person or corporation while he retains 
his place in the gallery; but nothing herein contained 
shall prevent such legislative reporter from engaging in 
other employment, provided such other employment is 
specifically approved by the committee on Rules and 
reported to the Senate. (100.) 

[1847; 1911; 1914; 1925.] 



The Senate Chamber and Adjoining Rooms. 

60. No person not a member shall be allowed to 
sit at the Senate table while the Senate is in session. 
(99.) 

[1853; 1888.] 



Rules of the Senate. 561 

61. No person, except members of the legislative 
and executive departments of the State government, 
persons in the exercise of an official duty directly con- 
nected with the business of the Senate, and legislative 
reporters who are entitled to the privileges of the re- 
porters' gallery, shall, unless invited by the President, 
be admitted to the floor of the Senate Chamber, or 
to the reception room or to the corridor between the 
reception room and the Senate Chamber, during the 
sessions of the Senate, or during the half hour pre- 
ceding or succeeding said sessions, nor to the Senate 
reading room, cloak room corridor, cloak room or 
anterooms on any day when a session of the Senate is 
held, except upon written invitation bearing the name 
of the person it is desired to invite and the name of the 
Senator extending the invitation, which invitation 
shall be surrendered when the said person enters the 
apartment. 

Publications desiring the privileges of the reporters' 
gallery' of the Senate Chamber for legislati\'e reporters, 
not members of the State House Press Association, 
shall make written application to the President stating 
the purposes for which the privileges are required, and 
such privileges shall be granted only upon written ap- 
proval by the President. 

No legislative counsel or agent shall be admitted to 
the floor of the Senate Chamber, nor, on any day when 
a session of the Senate is held, to the reading room, 
the cloak room, the reception room or the Senate 
corridors or anterooms. No person, except members 
of the legislative and executive departments of the 
State government, persons in the exercise of an official 
duty directl}^ connected with the business of the 
Senate and legislative reporters who are entitled to 
the privileges of the reporters' gallery, shall be per- 



562 Rules of the Senate. 

mitted to loiter in the reading room, the cloak room, 
the reception room or the Senate corridors or ante- 
rooms at any time. Smoking shall not be permitted 
in the reception room. (99.) 

[1870; 1875; 1886; 1891; 1895; 1896; 1897; 
1898; 1907; 1909; 1914; 1916; 1925.1 



Parliamentary Practice. 

62. The rules of parliamentary practice shall govern 
the Senate in all cases to which they are applicable, and 
in which they are not inconsistent with these rules or 
the joint rules of the two branches. (101.) 
[1847; 1858; 1882; 1895; 1963.] 



Alterations, Suspension or Repeal of Rules. 

53. This rule and rules 24, 31, 2>?>, 34 and 53 shall 
not be suspended if objection is made; and no other 
rule shall be altered, suspended or repealed, except by 
vote of two-thirds of the members present and voting 
thereon. (103.) 

[1817; 1841; 1848; 1882; 1888; 1891; 1893; 
1899; 1953.] 



INDEX TO SENATE RULES. 



Absence, leave of, Rule 11. 

Adjourn, motions to, 46, 52. 

Admission to Senate rooms, 61. 

Agents, legislative, not admitted to Senate Chamber, etc., 61. 

AMENDMENTS: 

private bill not in order as substitute for certain committee reports, 
15. 

lo rep